THE TRAGEDY OF (MARCIUS) CORIOLANUS

For the dearth [escassez],

The gods, not the patricians, make it, and

Your knees to them, not arms, must help.”

MENENIUS

There was a time when all the body’s members

Rebell’d against the belly, thus accused it:

That only like a gulf it did remain

I’ the midst o’ the body, idle and unactive,

Still cupboarding the viand, never bearing

Like labour with the rest, where the other instruments

Did see and hear, devise, instruct, walk, feel,

And, mutually participate, did minister

Unto the appetite and affection common

Of the whole body. The belly answer’d–

First Citizen

Well, sir, what answer made the belly?

MENENIUS

Sir, I shall tell you. With a kind of smile,

Which ne’er came from the lungs, but even thus–

For, look you, I may make the belly smile

As well as speak–it tauntingly replied

To the discontented members, the mutinous parts

That envied his receipt; even so most fitly

As you malign our senators for that

They are not such as you.

First Citizen

Your belly’s answer? What!

The kingly-crowned head, the vigilant eye,

The counsellor heart, the arm our soldier,

Our steed the leg, the tongue our trumpeter.

With other muniments and petty helps

In this our fabric, if that they–

MENENIUS

What then?

Fore me, this fellow speaks! What then? what then?

First Citizen

Should by the cormorant belly be restrain’d,

Who is the sink o’ the body,–

MENENIUS

Well, what then?

First Citizen

The former agents, if they did complain,

What could the belly answer?

MENENIUS

I will tell you

If you’ll bestow a small–of what you have little–

Patience awhile, you’ll hear the belly’s answer.

First Citizen

Ye’re long about it.

MENENIUS

Note me this, good friend;

Your most grave belly was deliberate,

Not rash like his accusers, and thus answer’d:

<True is it, my incorporate friends,> quoth he,

<That I receive the general food at first,

Which you do live upon; and fit it is,

Because I am the store-house and the shop

Of the whole body: but, if you do remember,

I send it through the rivers of your blood,

Even to the court, the heart, to the seat o’ the brain;

And, through the cranks and offices of man,

The strongest nerves and small inferior veins

From me receive that natural competency

Whereby they live: and though that all at once,

You, my good friends,>–this says the belly, mark me,–”

BRUTUS

The present wars devour him: he is grown

Too proud to be so valiant.”

VOLUMNIA

had I a dozen sons, each in my love

alike and none less dear than thine and my good

Marcius, I had rather had eleven die nobly for their

country than one voluptuously surfeit out of action.”

VOLUMNIA

the breasts of Hecuba,

When she did suckle Hector, look’d not lovelier

Than Hector’s forehead when it spit forth blood

At Grecian sword, contemning.”

MARCIUS

(…) You souls of geese,

That bear the shapes of men, how have you run

From slaves that apes would beat! Pluto and hell!

All hurt behind; backs red, and faces pale

With flight and agued fear! Mend and charge home,

Or, by the fires of heaven, I’ll leave the foe

And make my wars on you

LARTIUS

(…) Thou wast a soldier

Even to Cato’s wish, not fierce and terrible

Only in strokes; but, with thy grim looks and

The thunder-like percussion of thy sounds,

Thou madst thine enemies shake, as if the world

Were feverous and did tremble.”

MARCIUS

If any think brave death outweighs bad life

And that his country’s dearer than himself;

Let him alone, or so many so minded,

Wave thus, to express his disposition,

And follow Marcius.

They all shout and wave their swords, take him up in their arms, and cast up their caps

Not Afric owns a serpent I abhor

More than thy fame and envy. Fix thy foot.”

CAIUS MARCIUS CORIOLANUS! Bear

The addition nobly ever!

Flourish. Trumpets sound, and drums

LARTIUS

Marcius, his name?

CORIOLANUS

By Jupiter! forgot.

I am weary; yea, my memory is tired.

Have we no wine here?”

Five times, Marcius,

I have fought with thee: so often hast thou beat me,

And wouldst do so, I think, should we encounter

As often as we eat. By the elements,

If e’er again I meet him beard to beard,

He’s mine, or I am his: mine emulation

Hath not that honour in’t it had; for where

I thought to crush him in an equal force,

True sword to sword, I’ll potch at him some way

Or wrath or craft may get him.”

SICINIUS

Nature teaches beasts to know their friends.

MENENIUS

Pray you, who does the wolf love?

SICINIUS

The lamb.

MENENIUS

Ay, to devour him; as the hungry plebeians would the noble Marcius.

BRUTUS

He’s a lamb indeed, that baes like a bear.”

MENENIUS

I know you can do very little alone; for your helps are many, or else your actions would grow wondrous single: your abilities are too infant-like for doing much alone. You talk of pride: O that you could turn your eyes toward the napes of your necks, and make but an interior survey of your good selves! O that you could!”

one that converses more with the buttock of the night than with the forehead of the morning”

BRUTO

Ora, ora, Menênio, você é bastante conhecido por ser, como senador do Capitólio, um excelso histrião e bufão na mesa de jantar!”

VOLUMNIA

He had, before this last expedition, twenty-five wounds upon him.

MENENIUS

Now it’s twenty-seven: every gash was an enemy’s grave.

A shout and flourish

Hark! the trumpets.

VOLUMNIA

These are the ushers of Marcius: before him he

carries noise, and behind him he leaves tears:

Death, that dark spirit, in ‘s nervy arm doth lie;

Which, being advanced, declines, and then men die.”

VOLUMNIA

Nay, my good soldier, up;

My gentle Marcius, worthy Caius, and

By deed-achieving honour newly named,–

What is it?–Coriolanus must I call thee?–

Messenger

You are sent for to the Capitol. ‘Tis thought

That Marcius shall be consul:

I have seen the dumb men throng to see him and

The blind to bear him speak: matrons flung gloves,

Ladies and maids their scarfs and handkerchers,

Upon him as he pass’d: the nobles bended,

As to Jove’s statue, and the commons made

A shower and thunder with their caps and shouts:

I never saw the like.”

Second Officer

Faith, there had been many great men that have flattered the people, who ne’er loved them; and there be many that they have loved, they know not wherefore: so that, if they love they know not why, they hate upon no better a ground: therefore, for Coriolanus neither to care whether they love or hate him manifests the true knowledge he has in their disposition; and out of his noble carelessness lets them plainly see’t.

First Officer

(…) he seeks their hate with greater devotion than can render it him; and leaves nothing undone that may fully discover him their opposite. Now, to seem to affect the malice and displeasure of the people is as bad as that which he dislikes, to flatter them for their love.

he covets less

Than misery itself would give; rewards

His deeds with doing them, and is content

To spend the time to end it.”

Ingratitude is monstrous, and for the multitude to be ingrateful, were to make a monster of the multitude: of the which we being members, should bring ourselves to be monstrous members.”

visissytudes da democrashia:

We have been called so of many; not that our heads are some brown, some black, some auburn, some bald, but that our wits are so diversely coloured: and truly I think if all our wits were to issue out of one skull, they would fly east, west, north, south, and their consent of one direct way should be at once to all the points o’ the compass.”

Lá vem ele desfilando com a toga da humildade…

O preço do presente do mendigo eu não digo

A ESCULTURA DE PERSEU

Minhas feridas falam por mim.

Se cicatrizes fossem serpentes

Eu seria a Górgona, mas com mais cabeças, até os pés.

Melhor morrer, melhor agonizar,

do que conseguir o que tanto queríamos…”

Mas sabe, é de costume seguir os costumes…

POSIÇÃO OBJETÁVEL

Eu sou um coitado sem as vantagens do coitado

É como se tivessem praticado o coito

em mim

E eu na pior posição possível

Decididamente acharam que eu era uma espécie

de

Ralo da Fonte

God save the Consul

Go say “V.D.” Cone Sul

Mean man or mean men? Methinks it’s a mean beam machine…

First Citizen

No,’tis his kind of speech: he did not mock us.

Second Citizen

Not one amongst us, save yourself, but says

He used us scornfully: he should have show’d us

His marks of merit, wounds received for’s country.”

WHONCE UPON A TAME LAND

Lend me a hand and contest my remarks:

Would you wound my waves of wuthering whores?

Who wore that woody garment?

Who were them?

Brutos sabe boas maneiras

Come espinafre de boca fechada.

Também se amacome quieto.

E de barrigacheia.

CICLÃO

O cão que é espancado ao latir

É criado para latir

Inclusive ao ser espancado

HERE-ARE-KEY

Vouchsafe thy voice

There ain’t be nothing outrageous

Travel must ‘em

to reach your domains!

Only their voices are

foreseen, ‘fore-heard

Like herd

groaning

Eating daily grass

Oh, your Grace

Excuse Me

I am too ice hotter than you.

GILBER-TO GILL

Rate your hate: for whom would you not

take your hat?

Ate your 8 (s)corns

And be not a bait

Be keen as a kin’

A fault in the asfault

A QUE DUTOS EU VOO

BRUTUS

(…)

How youngly he began to serve his country,

How long continued, and what stock he springs of,

The noble house o’ the Marcians, from whence came

That Ancus Marcius, Numa’s daughter’s son,

Who, after great Hostilius, here was king;

Of the same house Publius and Quintus were,

That our beat water brought by conduits hither;

And (Censorinus,) nobly named so,

Twice being (by the people chosen) censor,

Was his great ancestor.”

PAÍS CONFUSO DE MALICE

Ditador escolhido

Presidente imposto

Duas coisas são certas

Só-negar

e Vivenciar

Still the steel plays a sound

a song

music

in the harps and the harpsichord

Oh no too soon!

To the Terpsic[h]ore

Herps and hemp is

on the shore

DON.E KICK-SHOT

Will you be willingly weening and whining to the windmill

of the Wheel?

Well-done Walrus!

Wretches!

For whom the rebels capitulate

and claims the Capitol?

Run!

REVOLUÇÃO A ESTIBORDO

Orquestrar um mo(n)tim

Deve ser mais difícil que desbaratar

A ordem

universal

Sir, answer

Oi, Sir!

I swear

I saw the sire

and it (she!) was awkward!

Wake!

Streamdberg

Mountains will move

Before you decide

What t’do!

Goad!

Incite!

Good-god!

In site…

In time..

Intimidate!

Date!

Apollogize

Come on, coma profound!

Se vira nos 47’ do segundo tempo, faustop gordão!

CORIOLANUS

Whoever gave that counsel, to give forth

The corn o’ the storehouse gratis, as ‘twas used

Sometime in Greece,–

MENENIUS

Well, well, no more of that.

CORIOLANUS

Though there the people had more absolute power,

I say, they nourish’d disobedience, fed

The ruin of the state.

BRUTUS

Why, shall the people give

One that speaks thus their voice?

CORIOLANUS

I’ll give my reasons,

More worthier than their voices. They know the corn

Was not our recompense, resting well assured

That ne’er did service for’t: being press’d to the war,

Even when the navel of the state was touch’d,

They would not thread the gates. This kind of service

Did not deserve corn gratis. Being i’ the war

Their mutinies and revolts, wherein they show’d

Most valour, spoke not for them: the accusation

Which they have often made against the senate,

All cause unborn, could never be the motive

Of our so frank donation. Well, what then?

How shall this bisson multitude digest

The senate’s courtesy? Let deeds express

What’s like to be their words: <we did request it;

We are the greater poll, and in true fear

They gave us our demands.> Thus we debase

The nature of our seats and make the rabble

Call our cares fears; which will in time

Break ope’ the locks o’ the senate and bring in

The crows to peck the eagles.

MENENIUS

Come, enough.

BRUTUS

Enough, with over-measure.

CORIOLANUS

No, take more:

What may be sworn by, both divine and human,

Seal what I end withal! This double worship,

Where one part does disdain with cause, the other

Insult without all reason, where gentry, title, wisdom,

Cannot conclude but by the yea and no

Of general ignorance,–it must omit

Real necessities, and give way the while

To unstable slightness: purpose so barr’d,

it follows,

Nothing is done to purpose. Therefore, beseech you,–

You that will be less fearful than discreet,

That love the fundamental part of state

More than you doubt the change on’t, that prefer

A noble life before a long, and wish

To jump a body with a dangerous physic

That’s sure of death without it, at once pluck out

The multitudinous tongue; let them not lick

The sweet which is their poison: your dishonour

Mangles true judgment and bereaves the state

Of that integrity which should become’t,

Not having the power to do the good it would,

For the in which doth control’t.

BRUTUS

Has said enough.

SICINIUS

Has spoken like a traitor, and shall answer

As traitors do.

CORIOLANUS

Thou wretch, despite o’erwhelm thee!

What should the people do with these bald tribunes?

On whom depending, their obedience fails

To the greater bench: in a rebellion,

When what’s not meet, but what must be, was law,

Then were they chosen: in a better hour,

Let what is meet be said it must be meet,

And throw their power i’ the dust.

BRUTUS

Manifest treason!

SICINIUS

This a consul? no.”

CORIOLANO

Quem quer que seja que teve a idéia de distribuir grãos dos depósitos de graça aos pobres, como era às vezes de usança na Grécia,–

MENÊNIO

Já não há mais disso!

CORIOLANO

–muito embora naqueles tempos os plebeus tivessem mais poder, esse poder não lhes saía melhor do que o poder de um Estado em ruínas, como terminam todos os alimentados pela discórdia.

BRUTO

E quê, então? Devia o povo ceder sua soberania a pelintras que gastam assim a saliva?

CORIOLANO

Eu estou do lado da razão, o que vale muito mais que discursos vazios. O povo sabe muito bem que jamais receberia comida à boca, por ser uma multidão de ingratos! Instados a defender o Estado na guerra, até se o umbigo de Roma fosse corrompido, eles nem por isso atravessariam armados os portões da cidade! Essa conduta não merece pão! Isso quando não iam à guerra, só para se amotinar e revoltar, o que não lhes concede, idem, muito valor! Antes de acusarem o senado, sem qualquer prerrogativa, deviam se arranjar um bom advogado! Como acabaria esse gado ingrato, esse cão infiel, digerindo nossa cortesia?! Eles pensam não estar em falta quando dizem: “Exigimi-lo; nós somos a razão de ser da aristocracia, então ela terá de ceder!” É assim que a degradação enfim invade o Capitólio e que viramos reféns da ralé! Nossa temperança se torna medo; cedo desmorona o púlpito, e a Águia de Zeus acaba devorada às bicadelas por corvos desprezíveis – o mais inverossímil contra-senso!

MENÊNIO

Vamos, Coriolano, já chega.

BRUTO

Não só já chega como já passou muito da conta!

CORIOLANO

Não, ouçam mais estas razões: que os homens e que o Olimpo testemunhem este perjúrio: onde uns menosprezam justificadamente, e outros insultam gratuitamente, onde nobreza, honra, sabedoria, já não podem prosperar senão segundo o Sim e o Não de uma massa ignara;– o que é importante já se perdeu, só restou a mais inconstante vileza: sociedade despropositada, significa que nada mais faz sentido! Prostrem-se, pois!– Vocês, que antes agem temerariamente que com discrição, que amam em primeiro lugar o topo, sem se perguntar o que se deve fazer para lá chegar, virtuosamente!– Vocês, sequiosos da boa-vida mas não da vida longa, sedentos pela incontinência, isentos de saúde e auto-controle, vocês jogam o corpo fora; assim como vocês fazem com a seiva do governo, drenando-a, façam de uma vez com que acabe o falatório! Arranquem fora suas línguas! Não permitam que esse órgão tão sensível, com donos tão torpes, prove do doce que é na verdade puro veneno: sua degenerescência desfigura o juízo e deprava o Estado! Toda a unidade esfarelaria nas mãos de quem não tem o poder de fazer o bem!

BRUTO

Ele já disse o bastante.

SICÍNIO

E falou como um traidor, e agora deve responder como os traidores respondem!

CORIOLANO

Celerados! Passam da medida no despeito! O que faz o populacho confiando nesses dois tribunos da plebe de cabeça oca? Se o povo só se contenta ao se revoltar, como pode ter arautos, arlequins, que assim como eles são incapazes de obedecer qualquer princípio? Na desordem, em que o mais necessário, mas o mais ausente, é a lei, foram esses dois eleitos: em boa hora, façamos o Direito prevalecer e arremessemo-los na lama do olvido!

BRUTO

É um traidor descarado!

SICÍNIO

Não, por Zeus, que isto é um cônsul!

Confúcio passa pela confusão, mas sereno não!

Valentia é conhecida como tolice, quando é dirigida de peito aberto ao maior número!”

BRUTUS

Or let us stand to our authority,

Or let us lose it. We do here pronounce,

Upon the part o’ the people, in whose power

We were elected theirs, Marcius is worthy

Of present death.

SICINIUS

Therefore lay hold of him;

Bear him to the rock Tarpeian, and from thence

Into destruction cast him.

BRUTUS

Aediles, seize him!

Citizens

Yield, Marcius, yield!

MENENIUS

Hear me one word;

Beseech you, tribunes, hear me but a word.

Aedile

Peace, peace!

MENENIUS

[To BRUTUS] Be that you seem, truly your

country’s friend,

And temperately proceed to what you would

Thus violently redress.

BRUTUS

Sir, those cold ways,

That seem like prudent helps, are very poisonous

Where the disease is violent. Lay hands upon him,

And bear him to the rock.

CORIOLANUS

No, I’ll die here.

Drawing his sword

There’s some among you have beheld me fighting:

Come, try upon yourselves what you have seen me.

MENENIUS

Down with that sword! Tribunes, withdraw awhile.

BRUTUS

Lay hands upon him.

COMINIUS

Help Marcius, help,

You that be noble; help him, young and old!

Citizens

Down with him, down with him!

In this mutiny, the Tribunes, the Aediles, and the People, are beat in

MENENIUS

Go, get you to your house; be gone, away!

All will be naught else.

Second Senator

Get you gone.

COMINIUS

Stand fast;

We have as many friends as enemies.

MENENIUS

Sham it be put to that?

First Senator

The gods forbid!

I prithee, noble friend, home to thy house;

Leave us to cure this cause.

MENENIUS

For ‘tis a sore upon us,

You cannot tent yourself: be gone, beseech you.

COMINIUS

Come, sir, along with us.

CORIOLANUS

I would they were barbarians–as they are,

Though in Rome litter’d–not Romans–as they are not,

Though calved i’ the porch o’ the Capitol–

MENENIUS

Be gone;

Put not your worthy rage into your tongue;

One time will owe another.

CORIOLANUS

On fair ground

I could beat forty of them.

COMINIUS

I could myself

Take up a brace o’ the best of them; yea, the two tribunes:

But now ‘tis odds beyond arithmetic;

[As chances estão contra nós, não vê?!]

And manhood is call’d foolery, when it stands

Against a falling fabric. Will you hence,

Before the tag return? whose rage doth rend

Like interrupted waters and o’erbear

What they are used to bear.

MENENIUS

Pray you, be gone:

I’ll try whether my old wit be in request

With those that have but little: this must be patch’d

With cloth of any colour.

COMINIUS

Nay, come away.

Exeunt CORIOLANUS, COMINIUS, and others

Seu coração é sua boca; o que forjam seus pulmões, é forçoso sua língua ventilar!”

O verdadeiro indignado esquece já ter ouvido aquele nome — o da Morte”

A víbora, deixada ser o que é, despovoaria a cidade e seria no lugar dos homens.”

Aquele que sabe o valor de um homem sabe também as suas falhas.”

Somos ingratos com o pé gangrenado, e esquecemos por quantas sendas ele já nos levou…”

Proceed by process”

MENENIUS

Consider this: he has been bred i’ the wars

Since he could draw a sword, and is ill school’d

In bolted language; meal and bran together

He throws without distinction. Give me leave,

I’ll go to him, and undertake to bring him

Where he shall answer, by a lawful form,

In peace, to his utmost peril.”

Ele não é Zeus, mas bem sabe a língua do Trovão!

VOLUMNIA

You might have been enough the man you are,

With striving less to be so; lesser had been

The thwartings of your dispositions, if

You had not show’d them how ye were disposed

Ere they lack’d power to cross you.”

(…)

Pray, be counsell’d:

I have a heart as little apt as yours,

But yet a brain that leads my use of anger

To better vantage.

(…)

You are too absolute;

Though therein you can never be too noble,

But when extremities speak. I have heard you say,

Honour and policy, like unsever’d friends,

I’ the war do grow together: grant that, and tell me,

In peace what each of them by the other lose,

That they combine not there.

(…)

Because that now it lies you on to speak

To the people; not by your own instruction,

Nor by the matter which your heart prompts you,

But with such words that are but rooted in

Your tongue, though but bastards and syllables

Of no allowance to your bosom’s truth.

Now, this no more dishonours you at all

Than to take in a town with gentle words,

Which else would put you to your fortune and

The hazard of much blood.

(…)

Action is eloquence, and the eyes of the ignorant

More learned than the ears–waving thy head,

Which often, thus, correcting thy stout heart,

Now humble as the ripest mulberry

That will not hold the handling: or say to them,

Thou art their soldier, and being bred in broils

Hast not the soft way which, thou dost confess,

Were fit for thee to use as they to claim,

In asking their good loves, but thou wilt frame

Thyself, forsooth, hereafter theirs, so far

As thou hast power and person.”

(…)

Go, and be ruled: although I know thou hadst rather

Follow thine enemy in a fiery gulf

Than flatter him in a bower.

To the market-place!

You have put me now to such a part which never

I shall discharge to the life.”

VOLUMNIA

I prithee now, sweet son, as thou hast said

My praises made thee first a soldier, so,

To have my praise for this, perform a part

Thou hast not done before.”

Away, my disposition, and possess me

Some harlot’s spirit! my throat of war be turn’d,

Which quired with my drum, into a pipe

Small as an eunuch, or the virgin voice

That babies lulls asleep! the smiles of knaves

Tent in my cheeks, and schoolboys’ tears take up

The glasses of my sight! a beggar’s tongue

Make motion through my lips, and my arm’d knees,

Who bow’d but in my stirrup, bend like his

That hath received an alms! I will not do’t,

Lest I surcease to honour mine own truth

And by my body’s action teach my mind

A most inherent baseness.”

let thy mother rather feel thy pride than fear thy dangerous stoutness, for I mock at death with as big heart as thou. Do as thou list thy valiantness was mine, thou suck’dst it from me, but owe thy pride thyself.”

CORIOLANUS

The word is <mildly>. Pray you, let us go:

Let them accuse me by invention, I

Will answer in mine honour.

MENENIUS

Ay, but mildly.

CORIOLANUS

Well, mildly be it then. Mildly!

Exeunt

BRUTUS MARIANNUS CAROLINGIUS

Put him to choler straight: he hath been used

Ever to conquer, and to have his worth

Of contradiction: being once chafed, he cannot

Be rein’d again to temperance; then he speaks

What’s in his heart; and that is there which looks

With us to break his neck.”

The fires i’ the lowest hell fold-in the people!

Call me their traitor! Thou injurious tribune!

Within thine eyes sat 20.000 deaths,

In thy hand clutch’d as many millions, in

Thy lying tongue both numbers, I would say

<Thou liest> unto thee with a voice as free

As I do pray the gods.”

SICINIUS

And in the power of us the tribunes, we,

Even from this instant, banish him our city,

In peril of precipitation

From off the rock Tarpeian never more

To enter our Rome gates: i’ the people’s name,

I say it shall be so.

Citizens

It shall be so, it shall be so; let him away:

He’s banish’d, and it shall be so.”

Despising, for you, the city, thus I turn my back: there is a world elsewhere.”

Our enemy is banish’d! he is gone! Hoo! hoo!

Shouting, and throwing up their caps

CORIOLANUS

What, what, what!

I shall be loved when I am lack’d. Nay, mother.

Resume that spirit, when you were wont to say,

If you had been the wife of Hercules,

Six of his labours you’ld have done, and saved

Your husband so much sweat. Cominius,

Droop not; adieu. Farewell, my wife, my mother:

I’ll do well yet. Thou old and true Menenius,

Thy tears are salter than a younger man’s,

And venomous to thine eyes. My sometime general,

I have seen thee stem, and thou hast oft beheld

Heart-hardening spectacles; tell these sad women

Tis fond to wail inevitable strokes,

As ‘tis to laugh at ‘em. My mother, you wot well

My hazards still have been your solace: and

Believe’t not lightly–though I go alone,

Like to a lonely dragon, that his fen [pântano, covil insalubre]

Makes fear’d and talk’d of more than seen–your son

Will or exceed the common or be caught

With cautelous baits and practise.”

While I remain above the ground, you shall

Hear from me still, and never of me aught

But what is like me formerly.”

SICINIUS

Are you mankind?

VOLUMNIA

Ay, fool; is that a shame? Note but this fool.

Was not a man my father? Hadst thou foxship

To banish him that struck more blows for Rome

Than thou hast spoken words?

SICINIUS

O blessed heavens!

VOLUMNIA

More noble blows than ever thou wise words;

And for Rome’s good. I’ll tell thee what; yet go:

Nay, but thou shalt stay too: I would my son

Were in Arabia, and thy tribe before him,

His good sword in his hand.

SICINIUS

What then?

VIRGILIA

What then!

He’ld make an end of thy posterity.

VOLUMNIA

Bastards and all.

Good man, the wounds that he does bear for Rome!

MENENIUS

Come, come, peace.

SICINIUS

I would he had continued to his country

As he began, and not unknit himself

The noble knot he made.

BRUTUS

I would he had.

VOLUMNIA

<I would he had>! ‘Twas you incensed the rabble:

Cats, that can judge as fitly of his worth

As I can of those mysteries which heaven

Will not have earth to know.

BRUTUS

Pray, let us go.

VOLUMNIA

Now, pray, sir, get you gone:

You have done a brave deed. Ere you go, hear this:–

As far as doth the Capitol exceed

The meanest house in Rome, so far my son–

This lady’s husband here, this, do you see–

Whom you have banish’d, does exceed you all.

BRUTUS

Well, well, we’ll leave you.

SICINIUS

Why stay we to be baited

With one that wants her wits?

VOLUMNIA

Take my prayers with you.

Exeunt Tribunes

I would the gods had nothing else to do

But to confirm my curses! Could I meet ‘em

But once a-day, it would unclog my heart

Of what lies heavy to’t.”

SICÍNIO

Está lúcida você?

VOLÚMNIA

É, covarde… Que vergonha! Olhem para este tolo!

Não foi um homem lúcido meu pai? Tem instintos de raposa

Alguém que, como você, tem a coragem de banir aquele que

Distribuiu mais golpes contra os bárbaros

Do que você jamais distribuiu palavras!

SICÍNIO

Pelo Olimpo!

VOLÚMNIA

Muito mais estocadas do que palavras sábias suas;

e para a sorte de Roma. Direi mais, antes que se vá:

Não vá tão depressa, fique: quisera meu filho

Estivera na Arábia, e sua legião diante dele,

Sua espada em sua destra mão.

SICÍNIO

Sim, e depois?

VIRGÍNIA

E depois!!

Ele extinguiria sua posteridade.

VOLÚMNIA

Bastardos e o restolho.

Homem de valor, todas as cicatrizes que ele adquiriu por Roma!

MENÊNIO

Ei, ei, calma!

SICÍNIO

Eu gostaria que ele seguisse em sua cidade

Como começou, e não desatasse deliberadamente

O nobre laço que ele atara.

BRUTO

Eu também gostaria.

VOLÚMNIA

<Eu também gostaria…>! Você, o inflamador das massas:

Gatunos, que podem avaliar alguém da estatura de meu filho

Tão bem quant’eu poss’avaliar dos mistérios qu’os Céus

Proíbem aos mortais desvelar.

BRUTO

Ora, com licença!

VOLÚMNIA

Senhor, pode ir embora:

Saiba que fez algo bem corajoso!

Antes de ir, porém, ouça isto:–

Enquanto o Capitólio exceder

Em valor a menor das casas romanas,

Enquanto isso, meu filho—

O marido desta que está’o meu lado, olhe bem—

meu filho que você baniu, ele excederá vocês todos!

BRUTO

Pois muito bem, hora de ir-me.

SICÍNIO

E para quê permanecer aqui,

Para ser ofendido

Por quem carece de juízo?

VOLÚMNIA

Vão com Hades, cachorros!

Saem os tribunos da plebe.

Bem desejara que em primeiro lugar os deuses

Confirmaram duma vez minhas imprecações!

Pudera eu vê-los uma vez por dia que fosse,

Descarregaria todo o peso qu’ora oprime

meu coração.”

A raiva é a minha janta. Digiro-me a mim mesma e me devoro no processo. Morro, portanto, de fome ao comer. Hera de se esperar a vingança contra o homem caluniador!”

Volsce

You had more beard when I last saw you; but your favour is well approved by your tongue. What’s the news in Rome? I have a note from the Volscian state, to find you out there: you have well saved me a day’s journey.”

Roman

The day serves well for them now. I have heard it said, the fittest time to corrupt a man’s wife is when she’s fallen out with her husband. Your noble

Tullus Aufidius will appear well in these wars, his great opposer, Coriolanus, being now in no request of his country.”

O dia é propício. Dizem que a hora mais indicada para corromper a esposa é quando ela acaba de botar o marido para fora de casa. Seu nobre Túlio Aufídio aparecerá para cortejar a cidadela e seu maior opositor, o dono da casa, Coriolano, não será encontrado.”

O world, thy slippery turns! Friends now fast sworn,

Whose double bosoms seem to wear one heart,

Whose house, whose bed, whose meal, and exercise,

Are still together, who twin, as ‘twere, in love

Unseparable, shall within this hour,

On a dissension of a doit, break out

To bitterest enmity: so, fellest foes,

Whose passions and whose plots have broke their sleep,

To take the one the other, by some chance,

Some trick not worth an egg, shall grow dear friends

And interjoin their issues. So with me:

My birth-place hate I, and my love’s upon

This enemy town. I’ll enter: if he slay me,

He does fair justice; if he give me way,

I’ll do his country service.

– Ei, você quer briga com o meu patrão?

– É, melhor do que querer algo com sua mulher, palerma!

AUFIDIUS

(…) thou hast beat me out

Twelve several times, and I have nightly since

Dreamt of encounters ‘twixt thyself and me;

We have been down together in my sleep,

Unbuckling helms, fisting each other’s throat,

And waked half dead with nothing. Worthy Marcius,

Had we no quarrel else to Rome, but that

Thou art thence banish’d, we would muster all

From twelve to seventy, and pouring war

Into the bowels of ungrateful Rome,

Like a bold flood o’er-bear. O, come, go in,

And take our friendly senators by the hands;

Who now are here, taking their leaves of me,

Who am prepared against your territories,

Though not for Rome itself.

CORIOLANUS

You bless me, gods!”

Let me have war, say I; it exceeds peace as far as day does night; it’s spritely, waking, audible, and full of vent. Peace is a very apoplexy, lethargy; mulled, deaf, sleepy, insensible; a getter of more bastard children than war’s a destroyer of men.” “A guerra é preferível; ela excele a paz como o dia excele a noite; é espirituosa, revigorante, sonora, promissora como o orvalho e a brisa refrescante da manhã. A paz é uma grande apoplexia e letargia; ensimesmada, surda, sonolenta, insensível; é mais capaz de gerar infantes bastardos que a guerra de destruir o homem. Se a guerra é um estupro, a paz é uma convenção de cornos. Sem falar que na paz é quando e onde o ódio entre os homens floresce! Porque quando não se precisa do outro, o outro é o inferno e o mal. Se eu fosse rico e guerras fossem um bem à venda, eu compraria todas! A arquitetura da destruição é a mais bela das artes. Não devemos tentar interromper o curso natural da natureza. Esta é a verdadeira harmonia do reino animal!”

Onde há paz, há comércio e concórdia! Quem discorda, pegue seu banquinho e suas trouxas… No triunfo do pacifismo, não há lugar para o amor-próprio! Não há tiranos no comando. A cidade dourada, abençoada pelos deuses, diz adeus aos canhões e às espadas! Eh, e quem ousa falar em guerra deve ser chicoteado! Eh, deixem os belicosos se matarem! Nenhum estuprador de donzelas em nossos portões! Sacrifícios nos templos, e não nas ruas. A verdade é que disparate tal é tão antinatural e improfícuo quanto caçar-se borboletas! Só o fruto delicado é doce. Lobos não consomem ovelhas nestes quadrantes! Concedo que é contra nossa vontade que enfraquecemos os fortes. Eles seriam bons trabalhadores. Mas temos de aceitar viver na mediocridade benfazeja. Nada como esquentar os pés na lareira, ler um livro na poltrona, ao lado da patroa, do cachorro e das crianças. Ah, e quantos quitutes para beliscar! Bem que ter fome é avidez guerreira, e longe de mim este cálice! Além do mais, sendo prósperos e diplomáticos, não há nenhum negócio que não consigamos fazer, para o bem de todos! Ninguém aqui é bombeiro, para lutar com fogo contra fogo!”

When, Caius, Rome is thine, thou art poorest of all; then shortly art thou mine.”

CORIOLANUS

Wife, mother, child, I know not. My affairs

Are servanted to others: though I owe

My revenge properly, my remission lies

In Volscian breasts. That we have been familiar,

Ingrate forgetfulness shall poison, rather

Than pity note how much. Therefore, be gone.

Mine ears against your suits are stronger than

Your gates against my force. Yet, for I loved thee,

Take this along; I writ it for thy sake

Gives a letter

And would have rent it. Another word, Menenius,

I will not hear thee speak. This man, Aufidius,

Was my beloved in Rome: yet thou behold’st!

AUFIDIUS

You keep a constant temper.

Aquele que desejaria se suicidar não receia sua morte por outrem. Portanto, não há quem possa pará-lo além das próprias leis da Física. Sejamos o que somos, enquanto durar o mundo; crescendo, com a idade, a miséria, ou, com a miséria, a idade. Como me disseram um dia, digo a vocês: Adeus, que Deus tenha piedade de nós!

Let it be virtuous to be obstinate.

What is that curt’sy worth? or those doves’ eyes,

Which can make gods forsworn? I melt, and am not

Of stronger earth than others. My mother bows;

As if Olympus to a molehill should

In supplication nod: and my young boy

Hath an aspect of intercession, which

Great nature cries <Deny not>. Let the Volsces

Plough Rome and harrow Italy: I’ll never

Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand,

As if a man were author of himself

And knew no other kin.”

Que ser obstinado seja o cume da virtude.

Do que valem essas súplicas? Os olhos de vítima imolada,

que fariam até os deuses recuarem? Eu derreto por dentro,

e não sou de chama superior a Prometeu. Minha mãe se ajoelha;

Como se o Olimpo reunido tivesse direito de venerar um inseto!

Se rende em súplicas, traz no colo meu caçula

A modos de interceder favoravelmente,

porque meu calcanhar berra: <Aquiles!>;

é contra a Mãe-Natureza e os instintos dizer <Não!>

a toda essa cena. E quer saber?

Que os volscos deitem Roma, minha excomungadora, e a Itália abaixo:

nunca irei ser um homem-gazela, obedecer à lei natural

e escutar o sangue que borbulha em minhas veias;

prefiro resistir, fazendo a abstração:

a de um homem que é autor de si mesmo

E não podia agir diferente. Não tenho família, não tenho pátria.

VITÓRIA DE PIRRO

Sou um títere da política

Um ator sem sentimentos no palco

Na verdade mesmo como ator

Sou um perfeito incompetente

O ator sente alguma coisa, dúvida, hesitação,

incorpora um personagem. Eu esqueci o texto,

começo agora do zero e a nada nem ninguém

devo minhas ações. Isso é ser deus!

É amargo, diferente do que pensam:

mas melhor do que desobedecer seu destino!

Sou tirano, mas não sou romano!

Sou a vitória, e a vitória é uma coisa bárbara!

Caia Capitólio!

Preferia botar a cabeça no chão, no subsolo,

Como perfeito avestruz,

Mas já que à realidade seu olhar me seduz,

Mulher te digo,

O beijo de despedida que te dei antes do exílio

foi o Beijo da Morte, da largada de minha corrida

contra o tempo para me vingar, e núpcias

de sangue que comparo à Lua de Mel

mais terna.

Whereto we are bound, together with thy victory,

Whereto we are bound? alack, or we must lose

The country, our dear nurse, or else thy person,

Our comfort in the country. We must find

An evident calamity, though we had

Our wish, which side should win: for either thou

Must, as a foreign recreant, be led

With manacles thorough our streets, or else

triumphantly tread on thy country’s ruin,

And bear the palm for having bravely shed

Thy wife and children’s blood. For myself, son,

I purpose not to wait on fortune till

These wars determine: if I cannot persuade thee

Rather to show a noble grace to both parts

Than seek the end of one, thou shalt no sooner

March to assault thy country than to tread–

Trust to’t, thou shalt not–on thy mother’s womb,

That brought thee to this world.

Dance no seu berço, meu filho,

Meu túmulo, minha buceta!

if thou conquer Rome, the benefit

Which thou shalt thereby reap is such a name,

Whose repetition will be dogg’d with curses;

Whose chronicle thus writ: <The man was noble,

But with his last attempt he wiped it out;

Destroy’d his country, and his name remains

To the ensuing age abhorr’d.>

CORIOLANUS

O mother, mother!

What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope,

The gods look down, and this unnatural scene

They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O!

You have won a happy victory to Rome;

But, for your son,–believe it, O, believe it,

Most dangerously you have with him prevail’d,

If not most mortal to him. But, let it come.

Aufidius, though I cannot make true wars,

I’ll frame convenient peace. Now, good Aufidius,

Were you in my stead, would you have heard

A mother less? or granted less, Aufidius?”

This Marcius is grown from man to dragon: he has wings; he’s more than a creeping thing.”

Esta é uma centopéia alada e temo que não tenhamos magos para combatê-la.

when he walks, he moves like an engine, and the ground shrinks before his treading: he is able to pierce a corslet with his eye; talks like a knell, and his hum is a battery. He sits in his state, as a thing made for Alexander. What he bids be done is finished with his bidding. He wants nothing of a god but eternity and a heaven to throne in.”

there is no more mercy in him than there is milk in a male tiger”

SICINIUS

The gods be good unto us!

MENENIUS

No, in such a case the gods will not be good unto us. When we banished him, we respected not them; and, he returning to break our necks, they respect not us.”

A merrier day did never yet greet Rome,

No, not the expulsion of the Tarquins.”

This Volumnia is worth of consuls, senators, patricians, a city full; of tribunes, such as you, a sea and land full.”

I raised him, and I pawn’d

Mine honour for his truth: who being so heighten’d,

He water’d his new plants with dews of flattery,

Seducing so my friends; and, to this end,

He bow’d his nature, never known before

But to be rough, unswayable and free.

(…) till, at the last,

I seem’d his follower, not partner, and

He waged me with his countenance, as if

I had been mercenary.

(…)

At a few drops of women’s rheum [coriza], which are

As cheap as lies, he sold the blood and labour

Of our great action: therefore shall he die,

And I’ll renew me in his fall.”

Second Conspirator

And patient fools,

Whose children he hath slain, their base throats tear

With giving him glory.”

Third Conspirator

Ere he express himself, or move the people

With what he would say, let him feel your sword,

Which we will second. When he lies along,

After your way his tale pronounced shall bury

His reasons with his body.”

Hail, lords! I am return’d your soldier,

No more infected with my country’s love

Than when I parted hence, but still subsisting

Under your great command. You are to know

That prosperously I have attempted and

With bloody passage led your wars even to

The gates of Rome. Our spoils we have brought home

Do more than counterpoise a full third part

The charges of the action. We have made peace

With no less honour to the Antiates

Than shame to the Romans: and we here deliver,

Subscribed by the consuls and patricians,

Together with the seal o’ the senate, what

We have compounded on.”

The Conspirators draw, and kill CORIOLANUS: AUFIDIUS stands on his body”

My rage is gone;

And I am struck with sorrow. Take him up.

Help, three o’ the chiefest soldiers; I’ll be one.

Beat thou the drum, that it speak mournfully:

Trail your steel pikes. Though in this city he

Hath widow’d and unchilded many a one,

Which to this hour bewail the injury,

Yet he shall have a noble memory.”

A dead march sounded”

Anúncios

THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO

Dumas [pai]

25/01/16-24/09/16

GLOSSÁRIO

Frascati: vinho branco italiano, procedente da região de mesmo nome

mazzolata: também mazzatello. Punição capital extremamente cruel empregada pela Igreja no século XVIII. A arma usada pelo carrasco era um enorme martelo ou um machado. O executor, no caso da 1ª arma, embalava a arma para pegar impulso no único golpe que desferia e acertava na cabeça do condenado, que se não morria caía desmaiado no chão e depois tinha a garganta cortada. Reservado a crimes hediondos.

singlestick: foi modalidade olímpica em 1904

I have a partner, and you know the Italian proverb – Chi ha compagno ha padrone – <He who has a partner has a master.>”

<but you were right to return as soon as possible, my boy.>

<And why?>

<Because Mercedes is a very fine girl, and fine girls never lack followers; she particularly has them by dozens.>

<Really?> answered Edmond, with a smile which had in it traces of slight uneasiness.”

Believe me, to seek a quarrel with a man is a bad method of pleasing the woman who loves that man.”

Why, when a man has friends, they are not only to offer him a glass of wine, but moreover, to prevent his suwallowing 3 or 4 pints [2 litros] of water unnecessarily!”

<Well, Fernand, I must say,> said Caderousse, beginning the conversation, with that brutality of the common people in which curiosity destroys all diplomacy, <you look uncommonly like a rejected lover;> and he burst into a hoarse laugh”

<they told me the Catalans were not men to allow themselves to be supplanted by a rival. It was even told me that Fernand, especially, was terrible in his vengeance.>

Fernand smiled piteously. <A lover is never terrible,> he said.”

pricked by Danglars, as the bull is pricked by the bandilleros”

<Unquestionably, Edmond’s star is in the ascendant, and he will marry the splendid girl – he will be captain, too, and laugh at us all unless.> – a sinister smile passed over Danglars’ lips – <unless I take a hand in the affair,> he added.”

happiness blinds, I think, more than pride.”

That is not my name, and in my country it bodes ill fortune, they say, to call a young girl by the name of her betrothed, before he becomes her husband. So call me Mercedes if you please.”

We are always in a hurry to be happy, Mr. Danglars; for when we have suffered a long time, we have great difficulty in believing in good fortune.”

<I would stab the man, but the woman told me that if any misfortune happened to her betrothed, she would kill herself>

<Pooh! Women say those things, but never do them.>”

<you are 3 parts drunk; finish the bottle, and you will be completely so. Drink then, and do not meddle with what we are discussing, for that requires all one’s wit and cool judgement.>

<I – drunk!> said Caderousse; <well that’s a good one! I could drink four more such bottles; they are no bigger than cologne flanks. Pere Pamphile, more wine!>”

and Caderousse rattled his glass upon the table.”

Drunk, if you like; so much the worse for those who fear wine, for it is because they have bad thoughts which they are afraid the liquor will extract from their hears;”

Tous les mechants sont beuveurs d’eau; C’est bien prouvé par le deluge.”

Say there is no need why Dantes should die; it would, indeed, be a pity he should. Dantes is a good fellow; I like Dantes. Dantes, your health.”

<Absence severs as well as death, and if the walls of a prison were between Edmond and Mercedes they would be as effectually separated as if he lay under a tombstone.>

<Yes; but one gets out of prison,> said Caderousse, who, with what sense was left him, listened eagerly to the conversation, <and when one gets out and one’s name is Edmond Dantes, one seeks revenge>-“

<I say I want to know why they should put Dantes in prison; I like Dantes; Dantes, our health!>

and he swallowed another glass of wine.”

the French have the superiority over the Spaniards, that the Spaniards ruminate, while the French invent.”

Yes; I am supercargo; pen, ink, and paper are my tools, and whitout my tools I am fit for nothing.” “I have always had more dread of a pen, a bottle of ink, and a sheet of paper, than of a sword or pistol.”

<Ah,> sighed Caderousse, <a man cannot always feel happy because he is about to be married.>”

Joy takes a strange effect at times, it seems to oppress us almost the same as sorrow.”

<Surely,> answered Danglars, <one cannot be held responsible for every chance arrow shot into the air>

<You can, indeed, when the arrow lights point downward on somebody’s head.>”

<That I believe!> answered Morrel; <but still he is charged>-

<With what?> inquired the elder Dantes.

<With being an agent of the Bonapartist faction!>

Many of our readers may be able to recollect how formidable such and accusation became in the period at which our story is dated.”

the man whom 5 years of exile would convert into a martyr, and 15 of restoration elevate to the rank of a god.”

glasses were elevated in the air à l’Anglais, and the ladies, snatching their bouquets from their fair bossoms, strewed the table with their floral treasures.”

yes, yes, they could not help admitting that the king, for whom we sacrificed rank, wealth and station was truly our <Louis the well-beloved,> while their wretched usurper has been, and ever wil be, to them their evil genius, their <Napoleon the accursed.>”

Napoleon is the Mahomet of the West and is worshipped as the personification of equality.”

one is the quality that elevantes [Napoleon], the other is the equality that degrades [Robespierre]; one brings a king within reach of the guillotine, the other elevates the people to a level with the throne.”

9 Termidor: degolação de Robespierre, num 27/7

4/4/14 – Queda de Napoleão

<Oh, M. de Villefort,>, cried a beautiful young creature, daughter to the Comte de Salvieux, and the cherished friend of Mademoiselle de Saint-Meran, <do try and get up some famous trial while we are at Marseilles. I never was in a law-cout; I am told it is so very amusing!>

<Amusing, certainly,> replied the young man, <inasmuch as, instead of shedding tears as at a theatre, you behold in a law-court a case of real and genuine distress – a drama of life. The prisoner whom you there see pale, agitated, and alarmed, instead of – as is the case when a curtain falls on a tragedy – going home to sup peacefully with his family, and then retiring to rest, that he may recommence his mimic woes on the morrow, – is reconducted to his prison and delivered up to the executioner. I leave you to judge how far your nerves are calculated to bear you through such a scene. Of this, however, be assured, that sould any favorable apportunity present itself, I will not fail to offer you the choice of being present.>

I would not choose to see the man against whom I pleaded smile, as though in mockery of my words. No; my pride is to see the accused pale, agitated and as though beaten out of all composure by the fire of my eloquence.”

Why, that is the very worst offence they could possibly commit, for, don’t you see, Renée, the king is the father of his people, and he who shall plot or contrive aught against the life and safety of the parent of 32 millions of souls, is a parricide upon a fearfully great scale.>”

It was, as we have said, the 1st of March, and the prisoner was soon buried in darkness.” 01/03/16

But remorse is not thus banished; like Virgil’s wounded hero, he carried the arrow in his wound, and, arrived at the salon, Villefort uttered a sigh that was almost a sob, and sank into a chair.”

Danglars was one of those men born with a pen behind the ear, and an inkstand in place of a heart. Everything with him was multiplication or subtraction. The life of a man was to him of far less value than a numeral, especially when, by taking it away, he could increase the sum total of his own desires. He went to bed at his usual hour, and slept in peace.”

A BARCA DO INFERNO QUE ARCA COM AS CONSEQÜÊNCIAS DO PE(S)CADO

desejos desejados no mar infinito

despojos desejosos de ser entregues aos derrotados

de consolo

que nojo

dessa raça

em desgraça

perpétua

que a maré a leve

para o fundo

do abismo

pesadâncora

pesadume

pesado cardume

proa perdeu o lume

popa nasceu sem gume

mastro adubado de petróleo

fóssil agora

apagado e insolente

eu sou experiente, experimente!

um louco que está sempre no lucro

das questões eu chego ao fulcro

por mais que não seja inteligente,

seja só uma compulsão demente

ser verdadeiro

se ver como herdeiro

de uma civilização

legada ao esquecimento

divino

o trem metafísico e seu lote de vagãos pagãos

levando à conclusão

de que o choque é elétrico

e anafilático

nada de milagre nada de intangível

só cobramos e debitamos o crível

(02/03/16)

said Louis XVIII, laughing; <the greatest captains of antiquity amused themselves by casting pebbles [seixos] into the ocean – see Plutarch’s Scipio Africanus.>”

<So then,> he exclaimed, turning pale with anger, <seven conjoined and allied armies overthrew that man. A miracle of heaven replaced me on the throne of my fathers after five-and-twenty years of exile. I have, during those 5-&-20 years, spared no pains to understand the people of France and the interests which were confided to me; and now when I see the fruition of my wishes almost within reach, the power I hold in my hands bursts, and shatters me to atoms!>”

Really impossible for a minister who has an office, agents, spies, and fifteen hundred thousand [1,5 million] francs for secret service money, to know what is going on at 60 leagues from the coast of France!”

Why, my dear boy, when a man has been proscribed by the mountaineers, has escaped from Paris in a hay-cart, been hunted over the plains of Bordeaux by Robespierre’s bloodhounds, he becomes accustomed to most things.”

<Come, come,> said he, <will the Restoration adopt imperial methods so promptly? Shot, my dear boy? What an idea! Where is the letter you speak of? I know you too well to suppose you would allow such a thing to pass you.>”

Quando a polícia está em débito, ela declara que está na pista; e o governo pacientemente aguarda o dia em que ela vem para dizer, com um ar fugitivo, que perdeu a pista.”

The king! I thought he was philosopher enough to allow that there was no murder in politics. In politics, my dear fellow, you know, as well as I do, there are no men, but ideas – no feelings, but interests; in politics we do not kill a man, we only remove an obstacle, that is all. Would you like to know how matters have progressed? Well, I will tell you. It was thought reliance might be placed in General Quesnel; he was recommended to us from the Island of Elba; one of us went to him, and visited him to the Rue Saint-Jacques, where he would find some friends. He came there, and the plan was unfolded to him for leaving Elba, the projected landing, etc. When he had heard and comprehended all to the fullest extent, he replied that he was a royalist. Then all looked at each other, – he was made to take an oath, and did so, but with such an ill grace that it was really tempting Providence to swear him, and yet, in spite of that, the general allowed to depart free – perfectly free. Yet he did not return home. What could that mean? why, my dear fellow, that on leaving us he lost his way, that’s all. A murder? really, Villefort, you surprise me.”

<The people will rise.>

<Yes, to go and meet him.>

Ring, then, if you please, for a second knife, fork, and plate, and we will dine together.”

<Eh? the thing is simple enough. You who are in power have only the means that money produces – we who are in expectation, have those which devotion prompts.>

<Devotion!> said Villefort, with a sneer.

<Yes, devotion; for that is, I believe, the phrase for hopeful ambition.>

And Villefort’s father extended his hand to the bell-rope to summon the servant whom his son had not called.”

Say this to him: <Sire, you are deceived as to the feeling in France, as to the opinions of the towns, and the prejudices of the army; he whom in Paris you call the Corsican ogre, who at Nevers is styled the usurper, is already saluted as Bonaparte at Lyons, and emperor at Grenoble. You think he is tracked, pursued, captured; he is advancing as rapidly as his own eagles. The soldiers you believe to be dying with hunger, worn out with fatigue, ready to desert, gather like atoms of snow about the rolling ball as it hastens onward. Sire, go, leave France to its real master, to him who acquired it, not by purchase, but by right of conquest; go, sire, not that you incur any risk, for your adversary is powerful enough to show you mercy, but because it would be humiliating for a grandson of Saint Louis to owe his life to the man of Arcola Marengo, Austerlitz.> Tell him this, Gerard; or, rather, tell him nothing. Keep your journey a secret; do not boast of what you have come to Paris to do, or have done; return with all speed; enter Marseilles at night, and your house by the back-door, and there remain quiet, submissive, secret, and, above all, inoffensive”

Every one knows the history of the famous return from Elba, a return which was unprecedented in the past, and will probably remain without a counterpart in the future.”

Napoleon would, doubtless, have deprived Villefort of his office had it not been for Noirtier, who was all powerful at court, and thus the Girondin of ‘93 and the Senator of 1806 protected him who so lately had been his protector.” “Villefort retained his place, but his marriage was put off until a more favorable opportunity.” “He made Morrel wait in the antechamber, although he had no one with him, for the simple sreason that the king’s procureur always makes every one wait, and after passing a quarter of an hour in reading the papers, he ordered M. Morrel to be admitted.”

<Edmond Dantes.>

Villefort would probably have rather stood opposite the muzzle of a pistol at five-and-twenty paces than have heard this name spoken; but he did not blanch.”

<Monsieur,> returned Villefort, <I was then a royalist, because I believed the Bourbons not only the heirs to the throne, but the chosen of the nation. The miraculous return of Napoleon has conquered me, the legitimate monarch is he who is loved by his people.>”

<There has been no arrest.>

<How?>

<It is sometimes essential to government to cause a man’s disappearance without leaving any traces, so that no written forms or documents may defeat their wishes.>

<It might be so under the Bourbons, but at present>-

<It has always been so, my dear Morrel, since the reign of Louis XIV. The emperor is more strict in prison discipline than even Louis himself>”

As for Villefort, instead of sending to Paris, he carefully preserved the petition that so fearfully compromised Dantes, in the hopes of an event that seemed not unlikely, – that is, a 2nd restoration. Dantes remained a prisoner, and heard not the noise of the fall of Louis XVIII’s throne, or the still more tragic destruction of the empire.” “At last there was Waterloo, and Morrel came no more; he had done all that was in his power, and any fresh attempt would only compromise himself uselessly.”

But Fernand was mistaken; a man of his disposition never kills himself, for he constantly hopes.”

Old Dantes, who was only sustained by hope, lost all hope at Napoleon’s downfall. Five months after he had been separated from his son, and almost at the hour of his arrest, he breathed his last in Mercedes’ arms.”

The inspector listened attentively; then, turning to the governor, observed, <He will become religious – he is already more gentle; he is afraid, and retreated before the bayonets – madmen are not afraid of anything; I made some curious observations on this at Charenton.> Then, turning to the prisoner, <What is it you want?> said he.”

<My information dates from the day on which I was arrested,> returned the Abbé Faria; <and as the emperor had created the kingdom of Rome for his infant son, I presume that he has realized the dream of Machiavelli and Caesar Borgia, which was to make Italy a united kingdom.>

<Monsieur,> returned the inspector, <providence has changed this gigantic plan you advocate so warmly.>

<It is the only means of rendering Italy strong, happy, and independent.>

<Very possibly; only I am not come to discuss politics, but to inquire if you have anything to ask or to complain of.>

<The food is the same as in other prisons, – that is, very bad, the lodging is very unhealthful, but, on the whole, passable for a dungeon; but it is not that which I wish to speak of, but a secret I have to reveal of the greatest importance.>

<It is for that reason I am delighted to see you,> continued the abbé, <although you have disturbed me in a most important calculation, which, if it succeded, would possibly change Newton’s system. Could you allow me a few words in private.>”

<On my word,> said the inspector in a low tone, <had I not been told beforehand that this man was mad, I should believe what he says.>”

A new governor arrived; it would have been too tedious to acquire the names of the prisoners; he learned their numbers instead. This horrible place contained 50 cells; their inhabitants were designated by the numbers of their cell, and the unhappy young man was no longer called Edmond Dantes – he was now number 34.”

Prisioneiros de segurança máxima não devem adoecer – que bactéria ou vírus cosmopolita os visitaria? Que mudança que fosse mais forte e sensível que o supertédio?

he addressed his supplications, not to God, but to man. God is always the last resource. Unfortunates, who ought to begin with God, do not have any hope in him till they have exhausted all other means of deliverance.”

Dantes spoke for the sake of hearing his own voice; he had tried to speak when alone, but the sound of his voice terrified him.”

in prosperity prayers seem but a mere medley of words, until misfortune comes and the unhappy sufferer first understands the meaning of the sublime language in which he invokes the pity of heaven!”

<Yes, yes,> continued he, <’Twill be the same as it was in England. After Charles I, Cromwell; after Cromwell, Charles II, and then James II, and then some son-in-law or relation, some Prince of Orange, a stadtholder¹ who becomes a king. Then new concessions to the people, then a constitution, then liberty. Ah, my friend!> said the abbé, turning towards Dantes, and surveying him with the kindling gaze of a prophet, <you are young, you will see all this come to pass.>”

¹ Magistrado de província holandesa

<But wherefore are you here?>

<Because in 1807 I dreamed of the very plan Napoleon tried to realize in 1811; because, like Napoleon, I desired to alter the political face of Italy, and instead of allowing it to be split up into a quantity of petty principalities, each held by some weak or tyrannical ruler, I sought to form one large, compact and powerful empire; and lastly, because I fancied I had found Caesar Borgia in a crowned simpleton, who feigned to enter into my views only to betray me. It was the plan of Alexander VI, but it will never succeed now, for they attempted it fruitlessly, and Napoleon was unable to complete his work. Italy seems fated to misfortune.> And the old man bowed his head.

Dantes could not understand a man risking his life for such matters. Napoleon certainly he knew something of, inasmuch as he had seen and spoken with him; but of Clement VII and Alexander VI he knew nothing.

<Are you not,> he asked, <the priest who here in the Chateau d’If is generally thought to be – ill?>

<Mad, you mean, don’t you?>

<I did not like to say so,> answered D., smiling.”

In the 1st place, I was 4 years making the tools I possess, and have been 2 years scraping and digging out earth, hard as granite itself; then what toil and fatigue has it not been to remove huge stones I should once have deemed impossible to loosen.”

Another, other and less stronger than he, had attempted what he had not had sufficient resolution to undertake, and had failed only because of an error in calculation.”

<When you pay me a visit in my cell, my young friend,> said he, <I will show you an entire work, the fruits of the thoughts and reflections of my whole life; many of them meditated over in the Colosseum at Rome, at the foot of St. Mark’s columm at Venice, little imagining at the time that they would be arranged in order within the walls of the Chateau d’If. The work I speak is called ‘A Treatise on the Possibility of a General Monarchy in Italy,’ and will make one large quarto volume.>”

I had nearly 5.000 volumes in my library at Rome; but after reading them over many times, I found out that with 150 well-chosen books a man possesses if not a complete summary of all human knowledge, at least all that a man need really know. I devoted 3 years of my life to reading and studying these 150 volumes, till I knew them nearly by heart; so that since I have been in prison, a very slight effort of memory has enabled me to recall their contents as readily as though the pages were open before me. I could recite you the whole of Thucidides, Xenophon, Plutarch, Titus Livius, Tacitus, Strada, Jornandes [Jordanes], Dante, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Spinoza, Machiavelli, and Bossuet.”

Yes, I speak 5 of the modern tongues – that is to say, German, French, Italian, English and Spanish; by the aid of ancient Greek I learned modern Greek – I don’t speak so well asI could wish, but I am still trying to improve myself.” “Improve yourself!” repeated Dantes; “why, how can you manage to do so?”

This last explanation was wholly lost upon Dantes, who had always imagined, from seeing the sun rise from behind the mountains and set in the Mediterranean, that it moved, and not the earth. A double movement of the globo he inhabited, and of which he could feel nothing, appeared to him perfectly impossible.”

Should I ever get out of prison and find in all Italy a printer courageous enough to publish what I have composed, my literary reputation is forever secured.”

What would you not have accomplished if you had been free?”

Possibly nothing at all; the overflow of my brain would probably, in a state of freedom, have evaporated in a 1,000 follies; misfortune is needed to bring to light the treasure of the human intellect. Compression is needed to explode gunpowder. Captivity has brought my mental faculties to a focus”

<if you visit to discover the author of any bad action, seek first to discover the person to whom the perpetration of that bad action could be in any way advantageous. Now, to apply it in your case, – to whom could your disappearance have been serviceable?>

<To no one, by heaven! I was a very insignificant person.>

<Do not speak thus, for your reply evinces neither logic nor philosophy; everything is relative, my dear young friend, from the king who stands in the way of his successor, to the employee who keeps his rival out of a place. Now, in the event of the king’s death, his successor inherits a crown, – when the employee dies, the supernumerary steps into his shoes, and receives his salary of 12.000 livres. Well, these 12.000 livres are his civil list, and are as essential to him as 12.000.000 of a king. Every one, from the highest to the lowest degree, has his place on the social ladder, and is beset by stormy passions and conflicting interests, as in Descartes’ theory of pressure and impulsion.” efeito borboleta parte I “But these forces increase as we go higher, so that we have a spiral which in defiance of reason rests upon the apex and not on the base.”

<Simply because that accusation had been written with the left hand, and I have noticed that> –

<What?>

<That while the writing of different persons done with the right hand varies, that performed with the left hand is invariably uniform.>”

That is in strict accordance with the Spanish character; an assassination they will unhesitatingly commit, but an act of cowardice never.”

Pray ask me whatever questions you please; for, in good truth, you see more clearly into my life than I do myself.”

<About six or seven and twenty years of age, I should say.>

<So,> anwered the abbé. <Old enough to be ambitious, but too young to be corrupt. And how did he treat you?>”

<That alters the case. Tis man might, after all, be a greater scoundrel than you have thought possible>

<Upon my word,> said Dantes, <you make me shudder. Is the world filled with tigers and crocodiles?>

<Yes; and remember that two-legged tigers and crocodiles are more dangerous than the others.>

Had a thunderbolt fallen at the feet of D., or hell opened its yawining gulf before him, he could not have been more completely transfixed with horror than he was at the sound of these unexpected words. Starting up he clasped his hands around his head as though to prevent his very brain from bursting, and exclaimed, <His father! his father!>”

D. was at lenght roused from his revery by the voice of Faria, who, having also been visited by his jailer, had come to invite his fellow-sufferer to share his supper. The reputation of being out of his mind though harmlessly and even amusingly so, had procured for the abbé unusual privileges. He was supplied with bread of a finer whiter quality than the usual prison fare, and even regaled each Sunday with a small quantity of wine.”

The elder prisoner was one of those persons whose conversation, like that of all who have experienced many trials, contained many usefel and important hints as well as sound information; but it was never egotistical, for the unfortunate man never alluded to his own sorrows. D. listened with admiring attention to all he said; some of his remarks corresponded with what he already knew, or applied to the sort of knowledge his nautical life had enabled him to acquire.”

I can well believe that so learned a person as yourself would prefer absolute solitude to being tormented with the company of one as ignorant and uninformed as myself.”

The abbé smiled: <Alas, my boy,> said he, <human knowledge is confined within very narrow limits; and when I have taught you mathematics, physics, history, and the 3 or 4 modern languages with which I am acquainted, you will know as much as I do myself. Now, it will scarcely require 2 years for me to communicate to you the stock of learnings I possess.>”

<Not their application, certainly, but their principles you may; to learn is not to know; there are the learners and the learned. Memory makes the one, philosophy the other.>

<But cannot one learn philosophy?>

<Philosophy cannot be taught; it is the application of the sciences to truth; it is like the golden cloud in which the Messiah went up into heaven.>”

An that very evening the prisoners sketched a plan of education, to be entered upon the following day. D. possessed a prodigious memory, combined with an astonishing quickness and readiness of conception; the mathematicla turn of his mind rendered him apt at al all kinds of calculation, while his naturally poetical feelings threw a light and pleasing veil over the dry reality of arithmetical computation, or the rigid severity of geometry. He already knew Italian, and had also picked up a little of the Romaic dialect during voyages to the East; and by the aid of these 2 languages he easily comprehended the construction of all the others, so that at the end of 6 months he began to speak Spanish, English, and German. In strict accordance with the promise made to the abbé, D. spoke no more of escape. Perhaps the delight his studies afforded him left no room for such thoughts; perhaps the recollection that he had pledged his word (on which his sense of honor was keen) kept him from referring in any way to the possibilities of flight. Days, even months, passed by unheeded in one rapid and instructive course. At the end of a year D. was a new man. D. observed, however, that Faria, in spite of the relief his society afforded, daily grew sadder; one thought seemed incessantly to harass and distract his mind. Sometimes he would fall into long reveries, sigh heavily and involuntarily, then suddenly rise, and, with folded arms, begin pacing the confined space of his dungeon. One day he stopped all at once, and exclaimed, <Ah, if there were no sentinel!>”

Esse tesouro, que deve corresponder a dois… de coroas romanas no mais afastado a… da segunda abertura co… declara pertencer a ele som… herdeiro. <25 de Abril, 149-”

Eu ouvi freqüentemente a frase <Tão rico como um Spada.>” “Ali, no 20º capítulo de a Vida do Papa Alexandre VI, constavam as seguintes linhas, que jamais poderei esquecer: – <As grandes guerras da Romagna terminaram; César Bórgia, que completou suas conquistas, precisava de dinheiro para adquirir a Itália inteira. O papa também precisava de dinheiro para liquidar seus problemas com Luís XII, Rei da França, que ainda era formidável a despeito de seus recentes reveses; e era necessário, portanto, recorrer a algum esquema rentável, o que era um problema de grande dificuldade nas condições de pauperização de uma exausta Itália. Sua santidade teve uma idéia. Ele resolveu fazer dois cardeais.

Ao escolher duas das maiores personagens de Roma, homens especialmente ricos – esse era o retorno pelo qual o pai santíssimo esperava. Primeiramente, ele poderia vender as grandes posições e esplêndidos ofícios que os cardeais já possuíam; e depois ele teria ainda dois chapéus para vender. Havia um terceiro ponto em vista, que logo aparecerá na narrativa. O papa e César Bórgia primeiro acharam os dois futuros cardeais; eles eram Giovanni Rospigliosi, que portava 4 das mais altas dignidades da Santa Sé; e César Spada, um dos mais nobres e ricos da nobreza romana; ambos sentiram a alta honraria de tal favor do papa. Eles eram ambiciosos, e César Bórgia logo encontrou compradores para suas posições. O resultado foi que Rospigliosi e Spada pagaram para ser cardeais, e 8 outras pessoas pagaram pelos ofícios que os cardeais tinham ante sua elevação; destarte 800.000 coroas entraram nos cofres dos especuladores.

É tempo agora de proceder à última parte da especulação. O papa encheu Rospigliosi e Spada de atenções, conferiu-lhes a insígnia do cardinalato, e os induziu a organizar seus negócios de forma a se mudarem para Roma. É aí que o papa e César Bórgia convidam os dois cardeais para jantar. Esse era um problema de disputa entre o santo pai e seu filho. César pensava que eles poderiam se utilizar de um dos meios que ele sempre tinha preparado para os amigos, i.e., em primeiro lugar, a famosa chave que era dada a certas pessoas com o pedido de que fossem e abrissem o armário equivalente. Essa chave era dotada de uma pequena ponta de ferro, – uma negligência da parte do chaveiro. Quando ela era pressionada a fim de abrir-se o armário, do qual a fechadura era complicada, a pessoa era picada por essa pontinha, e morria no dia seguinte. Havia também o anel com a cabeça de leão, que César usava quando queria cumprimentar seus amigos com um aperto de mão. O leão mordia a mão do assim favorecido, e ao cabo de 24h, a mordida se mostrava mortal. César propôs ao seu pai, que ou eles deveriam pedir aos cardeais para abrir o armário, ou apertar suas mãos; mas Alexandre VI respondeu: <Quanto aos valongos cardeais, Spada e Rospigliosi, convidemo-los para jantar, algo me diz que conseguiremos esse dinheiro de volta. Além disso, esquece-te, ó César, que uma indigestão se declara imediatamente, enquanto uma picada ou uma mordida ocasionam um atraso de um dia ou dois.> César recuou de tão convincente raciocínio, e os cardeais foram conseqüentemente chamados para jantar.

A mesa foi servida num vinhedo pertencente ao papa, perto de San Pierdarena, um retiro encantador que os cardeais conheciam de ouvir falar. Rospigliosi, bem disposto graças a suas novas dignidades, chegou com um bom apetite e suas maneiras mais obsequiosas. Spada, um homem prudente, e muito apegado a seu único sobrinho, um jovem capitão da mais alta promessa, pegou papel e caneta, e redigiu seu testamento. E depois mandou avisar o seu sobrinho para esperá-lo próximo ao vinhedo; mas aparentemente o servo não foi capaz de encontrá-lo.

Spada sabia o que esses convites significavam; desde a Cristandade, tão eminentemente civilizada, se alastrou por toda Roma, não era mais um centurião que vinha da parte do tirano com uma mensagem, <César quer que você morra.> mas era um núncio apostólico a latere, que vinha com um sorriso nos lábios para dizer, pelo papa, que <Sua santidade solicita sua presença num jantar.>

Spada se dirigiu lá pelas 2 a San Pierdarena. O papa o esperava. A primeira imagem a atrair a atenção de Spada foi a do seu sobrinho, todo paramentado, e César Bórgia cativando-o com as atenções mais marcadas. Spada empalideceu quando César o fitou com ar irônico, o que provava que ele havia antecipado tudo, e que a armadilha já estava em funcionamento.

Eles começaram a jantar e Spada foi capaz de indagar, somente, de seu sobrinho se ele tinha recebido sua mensagem. O sobrinho respondeu que não; compreendendo perfeitamente o significado da pergunta. Era tarde demais, já que ele já tinha tomado um copo de um excelente vinho, selecionado para ele expressamente pelo copeiro do papa. Spada testemunhou ao mesmo tempo outra garrafa, vindo a si, que ele foi premido a provar. Uma hora depois um médico declarou que ambos estavam envenenados por comer cogumelos. Spada morreu no limiar do vinhedo; o sobrinho expirou na sua própria porta, fazendo sinais que sua mulher não pôde compreender.

A seguir César e o papa se apressaram para botar as mãos na herança, sob o disfarce de estarem à procura de papéis do homem morto. Mas a herança consistia disso somente, um pedaço de papel em que Spada escreveu: -<Eu lego a meu amado sobrinho meus cofres, meus livros, e, entre outros, meu breviário com orelhas de ouro, que eu espero que ele preserve em consideração de seu querido tio.>

Os herdeiros procuraram em todo lugar, admiraram o breviário, se apropriaram dos móveis, e se espantaram grandemente de que Spada, o homem rico, era de fato o mais miserável dos tios – nenhum tesouro – e não ser que fossem os da ciência, contidos na biblioteca e laboratórios. Isso era tudo. César e seu pai procuraram, examinaram, escrutinaram, mas nada acharam, ou pelo menos muito pouco; nada que excedesse alguns milhares de coroas em prata, e aproximadamente o mesmo em dinheiro corrente; mas o sobrinho teve tempo de dizer a sua esposa, antes de morrer: <Procure direito entre os papéis do meu tio; há um testamento.>

Eles procuraram até mais meticulosamente do que os augustos herdeiros o fizeram, mas foi infrutífero. Havia dois palácios e um vinhedo atrás da Colina Palatina; mas nesses dias a propriedade da terra não tinha assim tanto valor, e os 2 palácios e o vinhedo continuaram com a família já que estavam abaixo da rapacidade do papa e seu filho. Meses e anos se passaram. Alexandre VI morreu, envenenado, – você sabe por qual erro. César, envenenado também, escapou desfolhando sua pele como a de uma cobra; mas a pele de baixo ficou marcada pelo veneno até se parecer com a de um tigre. Então, compelido a deixar Roma, ele acabou morto obscuramente numa escaramuça noturna; quase sem registros históricos. Depois da morte do papa e do exílio de seu filho, supôs-se que a família Spada voltaria ao esplendor dos tempos anteriores aos do cardeal; mas não foi o caso. Os Spada permaneceram em um conforto duvidoso, um mistério seguiu pairando sobre esse tema escuso, e o rumor público era que César, um político mais talentoso que seu pai, havia retirado do papa a fortuna dos 2 cardeais. Eu digo dos 2, porque o Cardeal Rospigliosi, que não tomara nenhuma precaução, foi completamente espoliado.”

Eu estava então quase certo de que a herança não ficara nem para os Bórgias nem para a família, mas se mantivera sem dono como os tesouros das 1001 Noites, que dormiam no seio da terra sob os olhos do gênio.”

esses caracteres foram traçados numa tinta misteriosa e simpática, que só aparecia ao ser exposta ao fogo; aproximadamente 1/3 do papel foi consumido pelas chamas.”

<2 milhões de coroas romanas; quase 13 milhões, no nosso dinheiro.” [*]

[*] $2.600.000 em 1894.”

Then an invincible and extreme terror seized upon him, and he dared not again press the hand that hung out of bed, he dared no longer to gaze on those fixed and vacant eyes, which he tried many times to close, but in vain – they opened again as soon as shut.”

<They say every year adds half a pound to the weight of the bones,> said another, lifting the feet.”

The sea is the cemetery of the Chateau d’If.”

It was 14 years day for day since Dantes’ arrest.”

At this period it was not the fashion to wear so large a beard and hair so long; now a barber would only be surprised if a man gifted with such advantages should consent voluntarily to deprive himself of them.”

The oval face was lengthened, his smiling mouth had assumed the firm and marked lines which betoken resolution; his eyebrows were arched beneath a brow furrowed with thought; his eyes were full of melancholy, and from their depths ocasionally sparkled gloomy fires of misanthropy and hatred; his complexion, so long kept from the sun, had now that pale color which produces, when the features are encircled with black hair, the aristocratic beauty of the man of the north; the profound learning he had acquired had besided diffused over his features a refined intellectual expression; and he had also acquired, being naturally of a goodly stature, that vigor which a frame possesses which has so long concentrated all its force within himself.”

Moreover, from being so long in twilight or darkness, his eyes had acquired the faculty of distinguishing objects in the night, common to the hyena and the wolf.”

it was impossible that his best friend – if, indeed, he had any friend left – could recognize him; he could not recognize himself.”

Fortunately, D. had learned how to wait; he had waited 14 years for his liberty, and now he was free he could wait at least 6 months or a year for wealth. Would he not have accepted liberty without riches if it had been offered him? Besides, were not those riches chimerical? – offspring of the brain of the poor Abbé Faria, had they not died with him?”

The patron of The Young Amelia proposed as a place of landing the Island of Monte Cristo, which being completely deserted, and having neither soldiers nor revenue officers, seemed to have been placed in the midst of the ocean since the time of the heathen Olympus by Mercury, the god of merchants and robbers, classes of mankind which we in modern times have separated if not made distinct, but which antiquity appears to have included in the same category” Tal pai, tal filho: vejo que um Dumas citou o outro, cf. o destino me comandou saber, por estar lendo A Dama das Camélias em simultaneidade – Jr. dissera a dado ponto, também inicial, de sua narrativa que era bom e inteligente que ladrões e comerciantes possuíssem antigamente o mesmo Deus, e que isso não era simples contingência histórica… Até aí, pensava tratar-se de Mammon, comentando o espúrio estilo de vida judio.

e qual solidão é mais completa, ou mais poética, que a de um navio flutuando isolado sobre as águas do mar enquanto reina a obscuridade da noite, no silêncio da imensidão, e sob o olhar dos Céus?”

Nunca um viciado em jogo, cuja fortuna esteja em jogo num lance de dados, chegou a experimentar a angústia que sentiu Edmundo em meio a seus paroxismos de esperança.”

<Em 2h,> ele disse, <essas pessoas vão partir mais ricas em 50 piastres cada, dispostas a arriscar novamente suas vidas só para conseguir outros 50; então retornarão com uma fortuna de 600 francos e desperdiçarão esse tesouro nalgum vilarejo, com aquele orgulho dos sultões e a insolência dos nababos.”

a providência, que, ao limitar os poderes do homem, gratifica-o ao mesmo tempo com desejos insaciáveis.”

<E agora,> ele exclamou, relembrando o conto do pescador árabe, que Faria relatou, <agora, abre-te sésamo!>”

o pavor – aquele pavor da luz do dia que mesmo no deserto nos faz temer estarmos sendo vigiados e observados.”

dentes brancos como os de um animal carnívoro”

seu marido mantinha sua tocaia diária na porta – uma obrigação que ele executava com tanta mais vontade, já que o salvava de ter de escutar os murmúrios e lamentos da companheira, que nunca o viu sem dirigir amargas invectivas contra o destino”

<And you followed the business of a tailor?>

<True, I was a tailor, till the trade fell off. It is so hot at Marseilles, that really I believe that the respectable inhabitants will in time go without any clothing whatever. But talking of heat, is there nothing I can offer you by way of refreshment?>”

<Too true, too true!> ejaculated Caderousse, almost suffocated by the contending passions which assailed him, <the poor old man did die.>”

Os próprios cães que perambulam sem abrigo e sem casa pelas ruas encontram mãos piedosas que oferecem uma mancheia de pão; e esse homem, um cristão, deviam permitir perecer de fome no meio de outros homens que se autodenominam cristãos? é terrível demais para acreditar. Ah, é impossível – definitivamente impossível!”

Eu não consigo evitar ter mais medo da maldição dos mortos que do ódio dos vivos.”

Hold your tongue, woman; it is the will of God.”

Happiness or unhappiness is the secret known but to one’s self and the walls – walls have ears but no tongue”

<Com isso então,> disse o abade, com um sorriso amargo, <isso então dá 18 meses no total. O que mais o mais devoto dos amantes poderia desejar?> Então ele murmurou as palavras do poeta inglês, <Volubilidade, seu nome é mulher.>

<no doubt fortune and honors have comforted her; she is rich, a countess, and yet–> Caderousse paused.”

Maneiras, maneiras de dizer asneiras…

Memorial de Buenos Aires

O aras à beira…

Bonaire de mademoiselle

Gastão amável que me acende o fogo!

ENCICLOPÉDIA DE UM FUTURO REMOTO

 

(…)

 

V

 

(…)

 

VANIGRACISMO [s.m., origem desconhecida; suspeita-se que guarde relação com vanitas, do latim <vaidade>]: espécie de atavismo do mal; inclinação ou tendência à reprise na crença de dogmas ultrapassados, como a pregação extremada do amor de Cristo ou o apego a regimes e práticas totalitários de forma geral. Duas faces do mesmo fenômeno. Nostalgia do Líder Supremo ou de coletivismos tornados impossíveis ou inexistentes nas democracias de massa, capitalismo avançado ou fase agônica do Ocidente.

        Adeptos são identificados sob a alcunha de vanigra.

Ex:

        Os vanigras brasileiros da década de 10 desejavam a conclamação de Bolsonaro como o Pai Nacional.

        O vanigra praguejou seu semelhante com a condenação ao Inferno no seu pós-vida, graças a suas condutas imorais.

 

vanigger – Corruptela de vanigra, utilizada para designar negros conservadores que insultavam a memória e o passado histórico de seus ancestrais escravos, ao professarem  credos como os supracitados (cristianismo, fascismo, etc.), invenções do homem branco europeu.

* * *

In business, sir, said he, one has no friends, only correspondents”

the tenacity peculiar to prophets of bad news”

It was said at this moment that Danglars was worth from 6 to 8 millions of francs, and had unlimited credit.”

Her innocence had kept her in ignorance of the dangers that might assail a young girl of her age.”

And now, said the unknown, farewell kindness, humanity and gratitude! Farewell to all the feelings that expand the heart! I have been heaven’s substitute to recompense the good – now the god of vengeance yields me his power to punish the wicked!”

in 5 minutes nothing but the eye of God can see the vessel where she lies at the bottom of the sea.”

He was one of those men who do not rashly court danger, but if danger presents itself, combat it with the most unalterable coolness.”

The Italian s’accommodi is untranslatable; it means at once <Como, enter, you are welcome; make yourself at home; you are the master.>”

he was condemned by the by to have his tongue cut out, and his hand and head cut off; the tongue the 1st day, the hand the 2nd, and the head the 3rd. I always had a desire to have a mute in my service, so learning the day his tongue was cut out, I went to the bey [governador otomano], and proposed to give him for Ali a splendid double-barreled gun which I knew he was very desirous of having.”

I? – I live the happiest life possible, the real life of a pasha. I am king of all creation. I am pleased with one place, and stay there; I get tired of it, and leave it; I am free as a bird and have wings like one; my attendants obey my slightest wish.”

What these happy persons took for reality was but a dream; but it was a dream so soft, so voluptuous, so enthralling, that they sold themselves body and soul to him who have it to them, and obedient to his orders as to those of a deity, struck down the designated victim, died in torture without a murmur, believing that the death they underwent was but a quick transtion to that life of delights of which the holy herb, now before you, had given them a slight foretaste.”

<Then,> cried Franz, <it is hashish! I know that – by name at least.>

<That it is precisely, Signor Aladdin; it is hashish – the purest and most unadulterated hashish of Alexandria, – the hashish of Abou-Gor, the celebrated maker, the only man, the man to whom there should be built a palace, inscribed with these words, <A grateful world to the dealer in happiness.>

Nature subdued must yield in the combat, the dream must succeed [suck-seed] to reality, and then the dream reigns supreme, then the dream becomes life, and life becomes the dream.”

When you return to this mundane sphere from your visionary world, you would seem to leave a Neapolitan spring for a Lapland winter – to quit paradise for earth – heaven for hell! Taste the hashish, guest of mine – taste the hashish.”

Tell me, the 1st time you tasted oysters, tea, porter, truffles, and sundry other dainties which you now adore, did you like them? Could you comprehend how the Romans stuffed their pheasants [faisões] with assafoetida (sic – asafoetida) [planta fétida, mas saborosa], and the Chinese eat swallow’s nests? [ninhos de andorinhas] Eh? no! Well, it is the same with hashish; only eat for a week, and nothing in the world will seem to you equal the delicacy of its flavor, which now appears to you flat and distasteful.”

there was no need to smoke the same pipe twice.”

that mute revery, into which we always sink when smoking excellent tobacco, which seems to remove with its fume all the troubles of the mind, and to give the smoker in exchange all the visions of the soul. Ali brought in the coffee. <How do you take it?> inquired the unknown; <in the French or Turkish style, strong or weak, sugar or none, coal or boiling? As you please; it is ready in all ways.>”

it shows you have a tendency for an Oriental life. Ah, those Orientals; they are the only men who know how to live. As for me, he added, with one of those singular smiles which did not escape the young man, when I have completed my affairs in Paris, I shall go and die in the East; and should you wish to see me again, you must seek me at Cairo, Bagdad, or Ispahan.”

Well, unfurl your wings, and fly into superhuman regions; fear nothing, there is a watch over you; and if your wings, like those of Icarus, melt before the sun, we are here to ease your fall.”

o tempo é testemunha

1001 Noites

The Count of Sinbad Cristo

Oh, ele não teme nem Deus nem Satã, dizem, e percorreria 50 ligas fora de seu curso só para prestar um favor a qualquer pobre diabo.”

em Roma há 4 grandes eventos todos os anos, – o Carnaval, a Semana Santa, Corpus Christi, o Festival de São Pedro. Durante todo o resto do ano a idade está naquele estado de apatia profunda, entre a vida e a morte, que a deixa parecida com uma estação entre esse mundo e o próximo”

<Para São Pedro primeiro, e depois o Coliseu,> retorquiu Albert. Mas Albrto não sabia que leva um dia para ver [a Basílica de] S. Pedro, e um mês para estudá-la. O dia foi todo passado lá.”

Quando mostramos a um amigo uma cidade que já visitamos, sentimos o mesmo orgulho de quando apontamos na rua uma mulher da qual fomos o amante.”

mulher amantizada”, aliás (livro de Dumas Filho) é o melhor eufemismo de todos os tempos!

<em Roma as coisas podem ou não podem ser feitas; quando se diz que algo não pode ser feito, acaba ali>

<É muito mais conveniente em Paris, – quando qualquer coisa não pode ser feita, você paga o dobro, e logo ela está feita.>

<É o que todo francês fala,> devolveu o Signor Pastrini, que acusou o golpe; <por essa razão, não entendo por que eles viajam.> (…)

<Homens em seu juízo perfeito não deixam seu hotel na Rue du Helder, suas caminhadas no Boulevard de Grand, e Café de Paris.>”

<Mas se vossa excelência contesta minha veracidade> – <Signor Pastrini,> atalhou Franz, <você é mais suscetível que Cassandra, que era uma profetisa, e ainda assim ninguém acreditava nela; enquanto que você, pelo menos, está seguro do crédito de metade de sua audiência [a metade de 2 é 1]. Venha, sente-se, e conte-nos tudo que sabe sobre esse Signor Vampa.>”

<O que acha disso, Albert? – aos 2-e-20 ser tão famoso?>

<Pois é, e olha que nessa idade Alexandre, César e Napoleão, que, todos, fizeram algum barulho no mundo, estavam bem detrás dele.>”

Em todo país em que a independência tomou o lugar da liberdade, o primeiro desejo dum coração varonil é possuir uma arma, que de uma só vez torna seu dono capaz de se defender e atacar, e, transformando-o em alguém terrível, com freqüência o torna temido.”

O homem de habilidades superiores sempre acha admiradores, vá onde for.”

MÁFIA: SEQÜESTRO, ESTUPRO, MORTE & A SUCESSÃO DO CLÃ

As leis dos bandidos [dos fora-da-lei] são positivas; uma jovem donzela pertence ao primeiro que levá-la, então o restante do bando deve tirar a sorte, no que ela é abandonada a sua brutalidade até a morte encerrar seus sofrimentos. Quando seus pais são suficientemente ricos para pagar um resgate, um mensageiro é enviado para negociar; o prisioneiro é refém pela segurança do mensageiro; se o resgate for recusado, o refém está irrevogavelmente perdido.”

Os mensageiros naturais dos bandidos são os pastores que habitam entre a cidade e as montanhas, entre a vida civilizada e a selvagem.”

<Tiremos a sorte! Tiremos a sorte!> berraram todos os criminosos ao verem o chefe. Sua demanda era justa e o chefe reclinou a cabeça em sinal de aprovação. Os olhos de todos brilharam terrivelmente, e a luz vermelha da fogueira só os fazia parecer uns demônios. O nome de cada um incluído o de Carlini, foi colocado num chapéu, e o mais jovem do bando retirou um papel; e ele trazia o nome de Diovolaccio¹. Foi ele quem propôs a Carlini o brinde ao chefe, e a quem Carlini reagiu quebrando o copo na sua cara. Uma ferida enorme, da testa à boca, sangrava em profusão. Diovolaccio, sentindo-se favorecido pela fortuna, explodiu em uma gargalhada. <Capitão,> disse, <ainda agora Carlini não quis beber à vossa saúde quando eu propus; proponha a minha a ele, e veremos se ele será mais condescendente consigo que comigo.> Todos aguardavam uma explosão da parte de Carlini; mas para a surpresa de todos ele pegou um copo numa mão e o frasco na outra e, enchendo o primeiro, – <A sua saúde, Diavolaccio²,> pronunciou calmamente, e ele entornou tudo, sem que sua mão sequer tremesse. (…) Carlini comeu e bebeu como se nada tivesse acontecido. (…) Uma faca foi plantada até o cabo no peito esquerdo de Rita. Todos olharam para Carlini; a bainha em seu cinto estava vazia. <Ah, ah,> disse o chefe, <agora entendo por que Carlini ficou para trás.> Todas as naturezas selvagens apreciam uma ação desesperada. Nenhum outro dos bandidos, talvez, fizesse o mesmo; mas todos entenderam o que Carlini fez. <Agora, então,> berrou Carlini, levantando-se por sua vez, aproximando-se do cadáver, sua mão na coronha de uma de suas pistolas, <alguém disputa a posse dessa mulher comigo?> – <Não,> respondeu o chefe, <ela é tua.>”

¹ Corruptela de demônio em Italiano

² Aqui o interlocutor, seu inimigo desde o sorteio, pronuncia o nome como o substantivo correto: diabo, demônio.

<Cucumetto violentou sua filha,> disse o bandido; <eu a amava, destarte matei-a; pois ela serviria para entreter a quadrilha inteira.> O velho não disse nada mas empalideceu como a morte. <Então,> continuou, <se fiz mal, vingue-a;>”

Mas Carlini não deixou a floresta sem saber o paradeiro do pai de Rita. Foi até o lugar onde o deixara na noite anterior. E encontrou o homem suspenso por um dos galhos, do mesmo carvalho que ensombreava o túmulo de sua filha. Então ele fez um amargo juramento de vingança sobre o corpo morto de uma e debaixo do corpo do outro. No entanto, Carlini não pôde cumprir sua promessa, porque 2 dias depois, num encontro com carabineiros romanos, Carlini foi assassinado. (…) Na manhã da partida da floresta de Frosinone Cucumetto seguiu Carlini na escuridão, escutou o juramento cheio de ódio, e, como um homem sábio, se antecipou a ele. A gente contou outras dez histórias desse líder de bando, cada uma mais singular que a anterior. Assim, de Fondi a Perusia, todo mundo treme ao ouvir o nome de Cucumetto.”

Cucumetto era um canalha inveterado, que assumiu a forma de um bandido ao invés de uma cobra nesta vida terrana. Como tal, ele adivinhou no olhar de Teresa o signo de uma autêntica filha de Eva, retornando à floresta, interrompendo-se inúmeras vezes sob pretexto de saudar seus protetores. Vários dias se passaram e nenhum sinal de Cucumetto. Chegava a época do Carnaval.”

4 jovens das mais ricas e nobres famílias de Roma acompanhavam as 3 damas com aquela liberdade italiana que não tem paralelo em nenhum outro país.”

Luigi sentia ciúmes! Ele sentiu que, influenciada pela sua disposição ambiciosa e coquete, Teresa poderia escapar-lhe.”

Por que, ela não sabia, mas ela não sentia minimamente que as censuras de seu amado fossem merecidas.”

<Teresa, o que você estava pensando enquanto dançava de frente para a jovem Condessa de San-Felice?> – <Eu estava pensando,> redargüiu a jovem, com toda a franqueza que lhe era natural, <que daria metade da minha vida por um vestido como o dela.>

<Luigi Vampa,> respondeu o pastor, com o mesmo ar daquele que se apresentasse Alexandre, Rei da Macedônia.

<E o seu?> – <Eu,> disse o viajante, <sou chamado Sinbad, o Marinheiro.>

Franz d’Espinay fitou surpreso.”

Sim, mas eu vim pedir mais do que ser vosso companheiro.> – <E o que poderia ser isso?> inquiriram os bandidos, estupefatos. – <Venho solicitar ser vosso capitão,> disse o jovem. Os bandidos fizeram uma arruaça de risadas. <E o que você fez para aspirar a essa honra?> perguntou o tenente. – <Matei seu chefe, Cucumetto, cujo traje agora visto; e queimei a fazenda San-Felice para pegar o vestido-de-noiva da minha prometida.> Uma hora depois Luigi Vampa era escolhido capitão, vice o finado Cucumetto.”

* * *

Minha casa não seria tão boa se o mundo lá fora não fosse tão ruim.

A vingança tem de começar nalgum lugar: a minha começa no cyberrealm, aqui.

nem é possível, em Roma, evitar essa abundante disposição de guias; além do ordinário cicerone, que cola em você assim que pisa no hotel, e jamais o deixa enquanto permanecer na cidade, há ainda o cicerone especial pertencente a cada monumento – não, praticamente a cada parte de um monumento.”

só os guias estão autorizados a visitar esses monumentos com tochas nas mãos.”

Eu disse, meu bom companheiro, que eu faria mais com um punhado de ouro numa das mãos que você e toda sua tropa poderiam produzir com suas adagas, pistolas, carabinas e canhões incluídos.”

E o que tem isso? Não está um dia dividido em 24h, cada hora em 60 minutos, e todo minuto em 60 segundos? Em 86.400 segundos muita coisa pode acontecer.”

Albert nunca foi capaz de suportar os teatros italianos, com suas orquestras, de onde é impossível ver, e a ausência de balcões, ou camarotes abertos; todos esses defeitos pesavam para um homem que tinha tido sua cabine nos Bouffes, e usufruído de um camarote baixo na Opera.”

Albert deixou Paris com plena convicção de que ele teria apenas de se mostrar na Itáia para ter todos a seus pés, e que em seu retorno ele espantaria o mundo parisiano com a recitação de seus numerosos casos. Ai dele, pobre Albert!”

e tudo que ele ganhou foi a convicção dolorosa de que as madames da Itália têm essa vantagem sobre as da França, a de que são fiéis até em sua infidelidade.”

mas hoje em dia ão é preciso ir tão longe quanto a Noé ao traçar uma linhagem, e uma árvore genealógica é igualmente estimada, date ela de 1399 ou apenas 1815”

A verdade era que os tão aguardados prazeres do Carnaval, com a <semana santa> que o sucederia, enchia cada peito de tal forma que impedia que se prestasse a menor atenção aos negócios no palco. Os atores entravam e saíam despercebidos e ignorados; em determinados momentos convencionais, os expectadores paravam repentinamente suas conversas, ou interrompiam seus divertimentos, para ouvir alguma performance brilhante de Moriani, um recitativo bem-executado por Coselli, ou para aplaudir em efusão os maravilhosos talentos de La Specchia”

<Oh, she is perfectly lovely – what a complexion! And such magnificent hair! Is she French?>

<No, Venetian.>

<And her name is–>

<Countess G——.>

<Ah, I know her by name!> exclaimed Albert; <she is said to possess as much wit and cleverness as beauty. I was to have been presented to her when I met her at Madame Villefort’s ball.>”

believe me, nothing is more fallacious than to form any estimate of the degree of intimacy you may suppose existing among persons by the familiar terms they seem upon”

Por mais que o balé pudesse atrair sua atenção, Franz estava profundamente ocupado com a bela grega para se permitir distrações”

Graças ao judicioso plano de dividir os dois atos da ópera com um balé, a pausa entre as performances é muito curta, tendo os cantores tempo de repousar e trocar de figurino, quando necessário, enquanto os dançarinos executam suas piruetas e exibem seus passos graciosos.”

Maioria dos leitores está ciente [!] de que o 2º ato de <Parisina> abre com um celebrado e efetivo dueto em que Parisina, enquanto dorme, se trai e confessa a Azzo o segredo de seu amor por Ugo. O marido injuriado passa por todos os paroxismos do ciúme, até a firmeza prevalecer em sua mente, e então, num rompante de fúria e indignação, ele acordar sua esposa culpada para contar-lhe que ele sabe de seus sentimentos, e assim infligir-lhe sua vingança. Esse dueto é um dos mais lindos, expressivos e terríveis de que jamais se ouviu emanar da pena de Donizetti. Franz ouvia-o agora pela 3ª vez.”

<Talvez você jamais tenha prestado atenção nele?>

<Que pergunta – tão francesa! Não sabe você que nós italianas só temos olhos para o homem que amamos?>

<É verdade,> respondeu Franz.”

<he looks more like a corpse permitted by some friendly grave-digger to quit his tomb for a while, and revisit this earth of ours, than anything human. How ghastly pale he is!>

<Oh, he is always as colorless as you now see him,> said Franz.

<Then you know him?> almost screamed the countess. <Oh, pray do, for heaven’s sake, tell us all about – is he a vampire, or a ressuscitated corpse, or what?>

<I fancy I have seen him before, and I even think he recognizes me.>”

Vou dizer-lhe, respondeu a condessa. Byron tinha a mais sincera crença na existência de vampiros, e até assegurou a mim que os tinha visto. A descrição que ele me fez corresponde perfeitamente com a aparência e a personalidade daquele homem na nossa frente. Oh, ele é a exata personificação do que eu poderia esperar. O cabelo cor-de-carvão, olhos grandes, claros e faiscantes, em que fogo selvagem, extraterreno parece queimar, — a mesma palidez fantasmal. Observe ainda que a mulher consigo é diferente de qualquer uma do seu sexo. Ela é uma estrangeira – uma estranha. Ninguém sabe quem é, ou de onde ela vem. Sem dúvida ela pertence à mesma raça que ele, e é, como ele, uma praticante das artes mágicas.”

Pela minha alma, essas mulheres confundiriam o próprio Diabo que quisesse desvendá-las. Porque, aqui – elas lhe dão sua mão – elas apertam a sua em correspondência – elas mantêm conversas em sussurros – permitem que você as acompanhe até em casa. Ora, se uma parisiense condescendesse com ¼ dessas coqueterias, sua reputação estaria para sempre perdida.”

Ele era talvez bem pálido, decerto; mas, você sabe, palidez é sempre vista como uma forte prova de descendência aristocrática e casamentos distintos.”

e, a não ser que seu vizinho de porta e quase-amigo, o Conde de Monte Cristo, tivesse o anel de Gyges, e pelo seu poder pudesse ficar invisível, agora era certo que ele não poderia escapar dessa vez.”

O Conde de Monte Cristo é sempre um levantado cedo da cama; e eu posso assegurar que ele já está de pé há duas horas.”

You are thus deprived of seeing a man guillotined; but the mazzuola still remains, which is a very curious punishment when seen for the 1st time, and even the 2nd, while the other, as your must know, is very simple.” [Ver glossário acima.]

do not tell me of European punishments, they are in the infancy, or rather the old age, of cruelty.”

As for myself, I can assure you of one thing, — the more men you see die, the easier it becomes to die yourself” opinion opium onion

do you think the reparation that society gives you is sufficient when it interposes the knife of the guillotine between the base of the occiput and the trapezal muscles of the murderer, and allows him who has caused us years of moral sufferings to escape with a few moments of physical pain?”

Dr. Guillotin got the idea of his famous machine from witnessing an execution in Italy.”

We ought to die together. I was promissed he should die with me. You have no right to put me to death alone. I will not die alone – I will not!”

Oh, man – race of crocodiles, cried the count, extending his clinched hands towards the crowd, how well do I recognize you there, and that at all times you are worthy of yourselves! Lead two sheep to the butcher’s, 2 oxen to the slaughterhouse, and make one of them understand that his companion will not die; the sheep will bleat for pleasure, the ox will bellow with joy. But man – man, whom God has laid his first, his sole commandment, to love his neighbor – man, to whom God has given a voice to express his thoughts – what is his first cry when he hears his fellowman is saved? A blasphemy. Honor to man, this masterpiece of nature, this king of creation! And the count burst into a laugh; a terrible laugh, that showed he must have suffered horribly to be able thus to laugh.”

The bell of Monte Citorio, which only sounds on the pope’s decease and the opening of the Carnival, was ringing a joyous peal.”

On my word, said Franz, you are wise as Nestor and prudent as Ulysses, and your fair Circe must be very skilful or very powerful if she succeed in changing you into a beast of any kind.”

Come, observed the countess, smiling, I see my vampire is only some millionaire, who has taken the appearance of Lara in order to avoid being confounded with M. de Rothschild; and you have seen her?”

without a single accident, a single dispute, or a single fight. The fêtes are veritable pleasure days to the Italians. The author of this history, who has resided 5 or 6 years in Italy, does not recollect to have ever seen a ceremony interrupted by one of those events so common in other countries.”

Se alle sei della mattina le quattro mile piastre non sono nelle mie mani, alla sette il conte Alberto avra cessato di vivere.

Luigi Vampa.

There were in all 6.000 piastres, but of these 6.000 Albert had already expended 3.000. As to Franz, he had no better of credit, as he lived at Florence, and had only come to Rome to pass 7 or 8 days; he had brought but a 100 louis, and of these he had not more than 50 left.”

Well, what good wind blows you hither at this hour?”

I did, indeed.”

Be it so. It is a lovely night, and a walk without Rome will do us both good.”

<Excellency, the Frenchman’s carriage passed several times the one in which was Teresa.>

<The chief’s mistress?>

<Yes. The Frenchman threw her a bouquet; Teresa returned it – all this with the consent of the chief, who was in the carriage.>

<What?> cried Franz, <was Luigi Vampa in the carriage with the Roman peasants?>”

Well, then, the Frenchman took off his mask; Teresa, with the chief’s consent, did the same. The Frenchman asked for a rendez-vous; Teresa gave him one – only, instead of Teresa, it was Beppo who was on the steps of the church of San Giacomo.”

<do you know the catacombs of St. Sebastian?>

<I was never in them; but I have often resolved to visit them.>

<Well, here is an opportunity made to your hand, and it would be difficult to contrive a better.>”

remember, for the future, Napoleon’s maxim, <Never awaken me but for bad news;> if you had let me sleep on, I should have finished my galop [dança de salão], and have been grateful to you all my life.”

<Has your excellency anything to ask me?> said Vampa with a smile.

<Yes, I have,> replied Franz; <I am curious to know what work you were perusing with so much attention as we entered.>

<Caesar’s ‘Commentaries,’> said the bandit, <it is my favorite work.>”

não há nação como a francesa que possa sorrir mesmo na cara da terrível Morte em pessoa.”

Apenas pergunte a si mesmo, meu bom amigo, se não acontece com muitas pessoas de nosso estrato que assumam nomes de terras e propriedades em que nunca foram senhores?”

a vista do que está acontecendo é necessária aos homens jovens, que sempre estão dispostos a ver o mundo atravessar seus horizontes, mesmo se esse horizonte é só uma via pública.”

foils, boxing-gloves, broadswords, and single-sticks – for following the example of the fashionable young men of the time, Albert de Morcerf cultivated, with far more perseverance than music and drawing, the 3 arts that complete a dandy’s education, i.e., fencing [esgrima], boxing, and single-stick”

In the centre of the room was a Roller and Blanchet <baby grand> piano in rosewood, but holding the potentialities of an orchestra in its narrow and sonorous cavity, and groaning beneath the weight of the chefs-d’oeuvre of Beethoven, Weber, Mozart, Haydn, Gretry, and Porpora.”

There on a table, surrounded at some distance by a large and luxurious divan, every species of tobacco known, – from the yellow tobacco of Petersburg to the black of Sinai, and so on along the scale from Maryland and Porto-Rico, to Latakia, – was exposed in pots of crackled earthenware [cerâmica] of which the Dutch are so fond; beside them, in boxes of fragrant wood, were ranged, according to their size and quality, pueros, regalias, havanas, and manillas; and, in an open cabinet, a collection of German pipes, of chibouques [cachimbo turco], with their amber mouth-pieces ornamented with coral, and of narghilés, with their long tubes of morocco, awaiting the caprice of the sympathy of the smokers.”

after coffee, the guests at a breakfast of modern days love to contemplate through the vapor that escapes from their mouths, and ascends in long and fanficul wreaths to the ceiling.”

A única diferença entre Jesus Cristo e eu é que uma cruz o carregava – eu é que carrego a minha cruz.

<Are you hungry?>

<Humiliating as such a confession is, I am. But I dined at M. de Villefort’s, and lawyers always give you very bad dinners. You would think they felt some remorse; did you ever remark that?>

<Ah, depreciate other persons’ dinners; you ministers give such splendid ones.>”

<Willingly. Your Spanish wine is excellent. You see we were quite right to pacify that country.>

<Yes, but Don Carlos?>

<Well, Don Carlos will drink Bordeaux, and in years we will marry his son to the little queen.>”

Recollect that Parisian gossip has spoken of a marriage between myself and Mlle. Eugenie Danglars”

<The king has made him a baron, and can make him a peer [cavalheiro], but he cannot make him a gentleman, and the Count of Morcerf is too aristocratic to consent, for the paltry sum of 2 million francs to a mesalliance [‘desaliança’, casamento com um malnascido]. The Viscount of Morcerf can only wed a marchioness.>

<But 2 million francs make a nice little sum,> replied Morcerf.”

<Nevermind what he says, Morcerf,> said Debray, <do you marry her. You marry a money-bag label, it is true; well but what does that matter? It is better to have a blazon less and a figure more on it. You have seven martlets on your arms; give 3 to your wife, and you will still have 4; that is 1 more than M. de Guise had, who so nearly became King of France, and whose cousin was emperor of Germany.>”

além do mais, todo milionário é tão nobre quanto um bastardo – i.e., ele pode ser.”

<M. de Chateau-Renaud – M. Maximilian Morrel,> said the servant, announcing 2 fresh guests.”

a vida não merece ser falada! – isso é um pouco filosófico demais, minha palavra, Morrel. Fica bem para você, que arrisca sua vida todo dia, mas para mim, que só o fez uma vez—“

<No, his horse; of which we each of us ate a slice with a hearty appetite. It was very hard.>

<The horse?> said Morcerf, laughing.

<No, the sacrifice,> returned Chateau-Renaud; <ask Debray if he would sacrifice his English steed for a stranger?>

<Not for a stranger,> said Debray, <but for a friend I might, perhaps.>”

hoje vamos encher nossos estômagos, e não nossas memórias.”

<Ah, this gentleman is a Hercules killing Cacus, a Perseus freeing Andromeda.>

<No, he is a man about my own size.>

<Armed to the teeth?>

<He had not even a knitting-needle [agulha de tricô].>”

He comes possibly from the Holy Land, and one of his ancestors possessed Calvary, as the Mortemarts(*) did the Dead Sea.”

(*) Wiki: “Anne de Rochechouart de Mortemart (1847-1933), duchess of Uzès, held one of the biggest fortunes in Europe, spending a large part of it on financing general Boulanger’s political career in 1890. A great lady of the world, she wrote a dozen novels and was the 1st French woman to possess a driving licence.”

Motto: “Avant que la mer fût au monde, Rochechouart portait les ondes”

<he has purchased the title of count somewhere in Tuscany?>

<He is rich, then?>

<Have you read the ‘Arabian Nights’?>

<What a question!>”

he calls himself Sinbad the Sailor, and has a cave filled with gold.”

<Pardieu, every one exists.>

<Doubtless, but in the same way; every one has not black salves, a princely retinue, an arsenal of weapons that would do credit to an Arabian fortress, horses that cost 6.000 francs apiece, and Greek mistresses.>”

<Did he not conduct you to the ruins of the Colosseum and suck your blood?> asked Beauchamp.

<Or, having delivered you, make you sign a flaming parchment, surrendering your soul to him as Esau did his birth-right?>”

The count appeared, dressed with the greatest simplicity, but the most fastidious dandy could have found nothing to cavil [escarnecer] at in his toilet. Every article of dress – hat, coat, gloves, and boots – was from the 1st makers. He seemed scarcely five-and-thirty. But what struck everybody was his extreme resemblance to the portrait Debray had drawn.”

Punctuality,> said M. Cristo, <is the politeness of kings, according to one of your sovereings, I think; but it is not the same with travellers. However, I hope you will excuse the 2 or 3 seconds I am behindhand; 500 leagues are not to be accomplished without some trouble, and especially in France, where, it seems, it is forbidden to beat the postilions [cocheiros].”

a traveller like myself, who has successively lived on maccaroni at Naples, polenta at Milan, olla podrida¹ at Valencia, pilau at Constantinople, karrick in India, and swallow’s nests in China. I eat everywhere, and of everything, only I eat but little”

¹ olla podrida: cozido com presunto, aves e embutidos.a

a embutido: carne de tripa

<But you can sleep when you please, monsieur?> said Morrel.

<Yes>

<You have a recipe for it?>

<An infallible one.>

(…)

<Oh, yes, returned M.C.; I make no secret of it. It is a mixture of excellent opium, which I fetched myself from Canton in order to have it pure, and the best hashish which grows in the East – that is, between the Tigris and the Euphrates.>”

he spoke with so much simplicity that it was evident he spoke the truth, or that he was mad.”

<Perhaps what I am about to say may seem strange to you, who are socialists, and vaunt humanity and your duty to your neighbor, but I never seek to protect a society which does not protect me, and which I will even say, generally occupies itself about me only to injure me; and thus by giving them a low place in my steem, and preserving a neutrality towards them, it is society and my neighbor who are indebted to me.>

(…) <you are the 1st man I ever met sufficiently courageous to preach egotism. Bravo, count, bravo!>” “vocês assumem os vícios que não têm, e escondem as virtudes que possuem.”

France is so prosaic, and Paris so civilized a city, that you will not find in its 85 departments – I say 85, because I do not include Corsica – you will not find, then, in these 85 departments a single hill on which there is not a telegraph, or a grotto in which the comissary of polie has not put up a gaslamp.”

<But how could you charge a Nubian to purchase a house, and a mute to furnish it? – he will do everything wrong.>

<Undeceive yourself, monsieur,> replied M.C.; <I am quite sure, that o the contrary, he will choose everything as I wish. He knows my tastes, my caprices, my wants. He has been here a week, with the instinct of a hound, hunting by himself. He will arrange everything for me. He knew, that I should arrive to-day at 10 o’clock; he was waiting for me at 9 at the Barrière de Fontainebleau. He gave me this paper; it contains the number of my new abode; read it yourself,> and M.C. passed a paper to Albert. <Ah, that is really original.> said Beauchamp.”

The young men looked at each other; they did not know if it was a comedy M.C. was playing, but every word he uttered had such an air of simplicity, that it was impossible to suppose what he said was false – besides, why whould he tell a falsehood?”

<Eu, em minha qualidade de jornalista, abro-lhe todos os teatros.>

<Obrigado, senhor,> respondeu M.C., <meu mordomo tem ordens para comprar um camarote em cada teatro.>

<O seu mordomo é também um núbio?> perguntou Debray.

<Não, ele é um homem do campo europeu, se um córsico for considerado europeu. Mas você o conhece, M. de Morcerf.>

<Seria aquele excepcional Sr. Bertuccio, que entende de reservar janelas tão bem?>

<Sim, você o viu o dia que eu tive a honra de recebê-lo; ele tem sido soldado, bandido – de fato, tudo. Eu não teria tanta certeza de que nesse meio-tempo ele não teve problemas com a polícia por alguma briguinha qualquer – uma punhalada com uma faca, p.ex.>”

Eu tenho algo melhor que isso; tenho uma escrava. Vocês procuram suas mulheres em óperas, o Vaudeville, ou as Variedades; eu comprei a minha em Constantinopla; me custa mais, mas não tenho do que reclamar.”

It was the portrait of a young woman of 5-or-6-and-20, with a dark complexion, and light and lustrous eyes, veiled beneath long lashes. She wore the picturesque costume of the Catalan fisher-women, a red and black bodice and golden pins in her hair. She was looking at the sea, and her form was outlined on the blue ocean and sky. The light was so faint in the room that Albert did not perceive the pallor that spread itself over the count’s visage, or the nervous heaving of his chest and shoulders. Silence prevailed for an instant, during which M.C. gazed intently on the picture. § <You have there a most charming mistress, viscount,> said the count in a perfectly calm tone”

Ah, monsieur, returned Albert, You do not know my mother; she it is whom you see here. She had her portrait painted thus 6 or 8 years ago. This costume is a fancy one, it appears, and the resemblance is so great that I think I still see my mother the same as she was in 1830. The countess had this portrait painted during the count’s absence.”

The picture seems to have a malign influence, for my mother rarely comes here without looking at it, weeping. This disagreement is the only one that has ever taken place between the count and countess, who are still as much united, although married more than 20 years, as on the 1st day of their wedding.”

Your are somewhat blasé. I know, and family scenes have not much effect on Sinbad the Sailor, who has seen so much many others.”

These are our arms, that is, those of my father, but they are, as you see, joined to another shield, which has gules, a silver tower, which are my mother’s. By her side I am Spanish, but the family of Morcerf is French, and, I have heard, one of the oldest of the south of France.”

<Yes, you are at once from Provence and Spain; that explains, if the portrait you showed me be like, the dark hue I so much admired on the visage of the noble Catalan.> It would have required the penetration of Oedipus or the Sphinx to have divined the irony the count concealed beneath these words, apparently uttered with the greatest politeness.”

A gentleman of high birth, possessor of an ample fortune, you have consented to gain your promotion as an obscure soldier, step by step – this is uncommon; then become general, peer of France, commander of the Legion of Honor, you consent to again commence a 2nd apprenticeship, without any other hope or any other desire than that of one day becoming useful to your fellow-creatures”

Precisely, monsieur, replied M.C. with ne of those smiles that a painter could never represent or a physiologist analyze.”

He was even paler than Mercedes.”

<And what do you suppose is the coun’s age?> inquired Mercedes, evidently attaching great importance to this question.

<35 or 36, mother.>

<So young, – it is impossible>”

The young man, standing up before her, gazed upon her with that filial affection which is so tender and endearing with children whose mothers are still young and handsome.”

I confess, I am not very desirous of a visit from the commisary of police, for, in Italy, justice is only paid when silent – in France she is paid only when she speaks.”

he has smitten with the sword, and he has perished by the sword”

while he stamped with his feet to remove all traces of his occupation, I rushed on him and plunged my knife into his breast, exclaiming, – <I am Giovanni Bertuccio; thy death for my brother’s; thy treasure for his widow; thou seest that my vengeance is more complete than I had hoped.> I know not if he heard these words; I think he did not for he fell without a cry.”

that relaxation of the laws which always follows a revolution.”

he who is about to commit an assassination fancies that he hears low cries perpetually ringing in his ears. 2 hours passed thus, during which I imagined I heard moans repeatedly.”

too great care we take of our bodies is the only obstacle to the success of those projects which require rapid decision, and vigorous and determined execution.”

No, no; but philosophy at half-past ten at night is somewhat late; yet I have no other observation to make, for what you say is correct, which is more than can be said for all philosophy.”

<heaven will bless you.>

<This, said M.C., is less correct than your philosophy, – it is only faith.>”

red is either altogether good or altogether bad.”

I do not like open doors when it thunders.”

the ocean called eterny”

For all evils there are 2 remedies – time and silence.”

Eu não tenho medo de fantasmas, e nunca ouvi falar de mortos terem causado tanto dano em 6 mil anos quanto os vivos num só dia.”

<It seems, sir steward,> said he <that you have yet to learn that all things are to be sold to such as care to pay the price.>

<His excellency is not, perhaps, aware that M. Danglars gave 16.000 francs for his horses?>

<Very well. Then offer him double that sum; a banker never loses an opportunity of doubling his capital.>”

you have been in my service 1 year, the time I generally give myself to judge of the merits or demerits of those about me.”

I am rich enough to know whatever I desire to know, and I can promise you I am not wanting in curiosity.”

<I assure your excellency,> said he, <that at least it shall be my study to merit your approbation in all things, and I will take M. Ali as my model.>

<By no means,> replied the count in the most frigid tones; <Ali has many faults mixed with most excellent qualities. He cannot possibly serve you as a pattern for your conduct, not being, as you are, a paid servant, but a mere slave – a dog, who, should he fail in his duty towards me, I should not discharge from my service, but kill.> Baptistin opened his eyes with astonishment.”

<Does the sum you have for them make the animals less beautiful,> inquired the count, shrugging his shoulders.”

I see; to your domestics you are <my lord,> the journalists style you <monsieur,> while your constituents call you <citizen>. These are distinctions very suitable under a constitutional government. I understand perfectly.”

I have acquired the bad habit of calling peorsons by their titles from living in a country where barons are still barons by right of birth.”

<My dear sir, if a trifle [ninharia] like that could suffice me, I should never have given myself the trouble of opening an account. A million? Excuse my smiling when you speak of a sum I am in the habit of carrying in my pocket-book or dressing-case.> And with these words M.C. took from his pocket a small case cantaining his visiting-cards and drew forth 2 orders on the treasury for 500.000 francs each, payable at sight to the bearer.”

I must confess to you, count, said Danglars, that I have hitherto imagined myself acquainted with the degree of all the great fortunes of Europe, and still wealth such as yours has been wholly unknown t me. May I presume to ask whether you have long possessed it?”

I have passed a considerable part of my life in the East, madame, and you are doubtless aware that the Orientals value only two things – the fine breeding of their horses and the beauty of their women.”

a woman will often, from mere wilfulness, prefer that which is dangerous to that which is safe. Therefore, in my opinion, my dear baron, the best and easiest way is to leave them to their fancies, and allow them to act as they please, and then, if any mischief follows, why, at least, they have no one to blame but themselves.”


“Debray, who perceived the gathering clouds, and felt no desire to witness the explosion of Madame Danglars’ rage, suddenly recollected an appointment, which compelled him to take his leave”

How grateful will M. de Villefort be for all your goodness; how thanfully will he acknowledge that to you alone he owes the existence of his wife and child!”

hated by many, but warmly supported by others, without being really liked by anybody, M. de Villefort held a high position in the magistracy, and maintened his eminence like a Harley or a Mole.” “A freezing politeness, a strict fidelity to government principles, a profound comtempt for theories and theorists, a deep-seated hatred of ideality, – these were the elements of private and public life displayed by M. de Villefort.”

<Finja pensar bem de si mesmo, e o mundo pensará bem de você,> um axioma 100x mais útil na sociedade hoje que aquele dos gregos, <Conhece-te a ti mesmo,> uma sabedoria que, em nosso dias, nós substituímos pela ciência menos complicada e mais vantajosa de conhecer os outros.”

4 revoluções sucessivas construíram e cimentaram o pedestal sobre o qual sua fortuna se baseia”

Ele deu bailes todos os anos, nos quais não aparecia por mais que ¼ de hora, – ou seja, 45min a menos do que o rei é visível em seus bailes. Nunca fôra visto em teatros, em concertos ou em qualquer lugar público de divertimento. Ocasionalmente, aliás raramente, chegava a jogar Whist, e ainda assim cuidado era tomado para selecionar os jogadores corretos – certas vezes se tratavam de embaixadores, outras, arcebispos; ou quem sabe um príncipe, ou um presidente, talvez alguma duquesa pensionista.”

From being slender he had now become meagre; once pale he was now yellow; his deep-set eyes were hollow, and the gold spectacles shielding his eyes seemed to be an integral portion of his face.”

<well sir, really, if, like you, I had nothing else to do, I should seek a more amusing occupation.>

<man is but an ugly caterpillar for him who studies him through a solar microscope; but you said, I think, that I had nothing else to do. Now, really, let me ask, sir, have you? – do you believe you have anything to do? or to speak in plain terms, do you really think that what you do deserves being called anything?>

It was a long time since the magisrate had heard a paradox so strong, or rather, to say the truth more exactly, it was the 1st time he had ever heard of it.”

it is with the justice of all countries especially that I have occupied myself – it is with the criminal procedure of all nations that I have compared natural justice, and I must say, sir, that it is the law of primitive nations, that is, the law of retaliation, that I have most frequently found to be according to the law of God.” “The English, Turkish, Japanese, Hindu laws, are as familiar to me as the French laws, and thus I was right, when I said to you, that relatively (you know that everything is relative, sir) – that relatively to what I have done, you have very little to do; but that relatively to all I have learned, you have yet a great deal to learn.”

I see that in spite of the reputation which you have acquired as a superior man, you look at everything from the material and vulgar view of society, beginning with man, and ending with man – that is to say, in the most restricted, most narrow view which it is possible for human understanding to embrace.”

Tobias took the angel who restored him to light for an ordinary young man. The nations took Attila, who was doomed to destroy them, for a conqueror similar to other conquerors, and it was necessary for both to reveal their missions, that they might be known and acknowledged”

It is not usual with us corrupted wretches of civilization to find gentlemen like yourself, possessors, as you are, of immense fortune – at least, so it is said – and I beg you to observe that I do not inquire, I merely repeat; – it is not usual, I say, for such privileged and wealthy beings to waste their time in speculations on the state of society, in philosophical reveries, intended at best to console those whom fate has disinherited from the goods of this world.”

The domination of kings are limited either by mountains or rivers, or a change of manners, or an alteration of language. My kingdom is bounded only by the world, for I am not an Italian, or a Frenchman, or a Hindu, or an American, or a Spaniard – I am a cosmopolite. No country can say it saw my birth. God alone knows what country will see me die. I adopt all customs, speak all languages. You believe me to be a Frenchman, for I speak French with the same facility and purity as yourself. Well, Ali, my Nubian, believes me to be an Arab; Bertuccio, my steward, takes me for a Roman; Haidée, my slave, thinks me a Greek. You may, therefore, comprehend, that being of no country, asking no protection from any government, acknowledging no man as my brother, not one of the scruples that arrest the powerful, or the obstacles which paralyze the weak, paralyzes or arrests me. I have only 2 adversaries – I will not say 2 conquerors, for with perseverance I subdue even them, – they are time and distance. There is a 3rd, and the most terrible – that is my condition asa mortal being, this alone can stop me in my onward career, before I have attained the goal at which I aim, for all the rest I have reduced to mathematical terms. What men call the chances of fate – namey, ruin, change, circumstances – I have fully anticipated, and if any of these should overtake me, yet it will not overwhelm me. Unless I die, I shall always be what I am, and therefore it is that I utter the things you have never heard, even from the mouths of kings – for kings have need, and oher persons have fear of you. For who is there who does not say to himself, in a society as incongruously organized as ours, <Perhaps some day I shall have to do with the king’s attorney>?”

we no longer talk, we rise to dissertation.” Engraçada inversão de sentido em relação ao Prefácio da Enciclopédia francesa, que vê nisso o fato de um monólogo cego, nada nobre.

Eu desejo ser a Providência eu mesmo, porque eu sinto que a coisa mais bela, nobre, mais sublime de todas no mundo, é recompensar e punir.”

o filho de Deus é tão invisível quanto o pai.”

<(…) Tudo o que eu posso fazer por você é torná-lo um dos agentes dessa Providência.> A barganha estava concluída. Devo sacrificar minh’alma, mas que importa afinal? Se fosse para fazer tudo de novo, faria de novo.” Villefort olhou o Conde de Monte Cristo admiradíssimo. “Conde, você tem parentes?”

Não, senhor, estou só no mundo.”

Oh, tanto pior.”

há algo que temer além da morte, da velhice e da loucura. P.ex., existe a apoplexia – aquele raio que atinge-o mas sem destruir, mas que de certo modo leva tudo a um fim.” “a ruptura de uma veia no lobo cerebral destruiu tudo isso, não num dia, não numa hora, mas num segundo. Noirtier, que, na noite anterior, era o velho jacobino, o velho senador, o velho Carbonaro, gargalhando à guilhotina, ao canhão, e à adaga – este Noirtier, jogando com revoluções – Monsieur Noirtier, para quem a França era um vasto tabuleiro de xadrez, de onde peões, bispos, cavaleiros e rainhas eram contìnuamente varridos, até o xeque-mate do rei – M.N., o formidável, era, na manhã seguinte, <o pobre N.,> o velho frágil, sob os ternos cuidados da mais fraca das criaturas da casa, i.e., sua neta, Valentina” Nunca chame uma mulher de fraca antes d’a vingança estar completada!

Cem escriores desde Sócrates, Sêneca, St. Agostinho,e Gall, fizeram, em verso e prosa, a comparação que você fez, e ainda assim eu posso mui bem deduzir que os sofrimentos paternos devem causar grandes transformações na mente de um filho.”

Valentina, a filha do meu primeiro casamento – com senhorita Renée de St.-Meran – e Eduardo, o garoto que você hoje salvou.”

<Meu palpite é,> respondeu V., <que meu pai, conduzido por suas paixões; cometeu algumas faltas desconhecidas para a justiça humana, mas marcadas na justiça de Deus. Esse Deus, desejoso em sua misericórdia de punir uma pessoa e mais ninguém, fez justiça nele tão-somente.> O Conde de Monte Cristo, com um sorriso nos lábios, emitiu, das profundezas de sua alma, um grunhido que teria feito V. voar se ao menos tivesse escutado.”

Sua atitude, embora natural para uma mulher oriental, seria, numa européia, confundida com algo emanando luxúria demais.” “E, para completar o quadro, Haidée se encontrava em plena primavera e no auge dos charmes da juventude – ela ainda não tinha ultrapassado os 20 verões.”

Nunca vi ninguém que eu preferisse a você, e nunca amei qualquer um, exceto você e meu pai.”

não é a árvore que abandona a flor – é a flor que cai da árvore.”

Meu pai tinha uma grande barba branca, mas eu o amava; ele tinha 60, mas para mim era mais bonito que qualquer jovem que já tivesse contemplado.”

Acredite: quando 3 grandes paixões, tristeza, amor e gratidão, preenchem o coração, ennui não tem lugar.”

Juventude é a flor da qual amor é o fruto; feliz é aquele que, depois de assistir seu silencioso crescimento, é o felizardo a pegar o fruto e chamá-lo seu.” Píndaro

Havia um estúdio para Emmanuel, que nunca estudava, e uma sala de concertos para Júlia, que nunca tocava.”

Morrel, ao morrer, deixou 500 mil francos, que foram partilhados entre mim e minha irmã, seus únicos descendentes.”

Oh, it was touching superstition, monsieur, and although I did not myself believe it, I would not for the world have destroyed my father’s faith. How often did he muse over it and pronounce the name of a dear friend – a friend lost to him forever; and on his death-bed, when the near approach of eternity seemed to have illumined his mind with supernatural light, this thought, which had until then been but a doubt, became a conviction and his last words were, <Maximilian, it was Edmond Dantes!> At these words the count’s paleness, which had for some time been increasing, became alarming; he could not speak”

M. Franz is not expected to return home for a year to come, I am told; in that time many favorable and unforeseen chances may befriend us.”

Valentine, while reproaching me with selfishness, think a little what you have been to me – the beautiful but cold resemblance of a marble Venus. What promise of future reward have you made me for all the submission and obedience I have evinced? – none whatever.”

The general remark is, <Oh, it cannot be excepcted that one of so stern a character as M. Villefort could lavish the tenderness some fathers do on their daughters. What though she has lost her own mother at a tender age, she has had tha happiness to find a 2nd mother in Madame de Ville.” “my father abandons me from utter indifference, while my mother-in-law detests me with a hatred so much the more terrible because it is veiled beneath a continual smile.”

I do not know; but, though unwilling to introduce money matters into our present conversation, I will just say this much – that her extreme dislike to me has its origin there; and I much fear she envies me the fortime I enjoy in right of my mother, and wich will be more than doubled at the death of M. and Mme. de Saint-Meran, whose sole heiress I am.”

no one could oppose him; he is all-powerful even with the king; he would crush you at a word.”

I am, for many reasons, not altogether so much beneath your alliance. The days when such distinctions were so nicely weighed and considered no longer exist in France, and the 1st families of the monarchy have intermarried with those of the empire. The aristocracy of the lance has allied itself with the nobility of the cannon.”

Don’t speak of Marseilles, I beg of your, Maximilian; that one word brings back my mother to my recollection – my angel mother, who died too soon for myself, and all who knew her.”

<Tell me truly, Maximilian, wether in former days, when our fathers dwelt at Marseilles, there was ever any misunderstanding between them?>

<Not that I am aware of,> replied the young man, <unless; indeed, any ill-feeling might have arisen from their being of opposite parties – your father was, as you know, a zealous partisan of the Bourbons, while mine was wholly devoted to the emperor>”

How singular, murmured Maximilian; your father hates me, while your grandfather, on the contrary – What strange feelings are aroused by politics.”

<And Monsieur de Monte Cristo, King of China, Emperor of Cochin-China,> said the young im[p][ertinent]”

And that is the case, observed Count of Monte Cristo. I have seen Russians devour, without being visibly inconvenienced, vegetable substances which would infallibly have killed a Neapolitan or an Arab.”

Well, supose that this poison was brucine, and you were to take a milligramme the 1st day, 2mg the 2nd, and so on. Well, at the end of 10 days you would have taken a centigramme [+40mg, cumulativamente], at the end of 20 days, increasing another mg, you would have taken 300 centigrammes [?]; that is to say, a dose which you would support without inconvenience, and which would be very dangerous for any other person who had not taken the same precautions as yourself. Well, then, at the end of a month, when drinking water from the same carafe, you would kill the person who drank with you, without your perceiving, otherwise than from slight inconvenience, that there was any poisonous substance mingles with this water.”

<I have often read, and read again, the history of Mithridates,> said Mme. de Villefort in a tone of reflection, <and had always considered it a fable.>

<No, madame, contrary to most history, it is true (…)>

<True, sir. The 2 favorite studies of my youth were botany and mineralogy, and subsequently when I learned the use of simple frequency explained the whole history of a people, and the entire life of individuals in the East, as flowers betoken and symbolize a love affair, I have regretted, that I was not a man, that I might have been a Flamel¹, a Fontana², or a Cabanis³.>

<And the more, madame,> said Counf of Monte Cristo, <as the Orientals do not confine themselves, as did Mithridates, to make a cuirass [escudo; proteção; couraça] of the poisons, but they also made them a dagger.>”

¹ Alquimista dos séc. XIV-XV.

² Médico italiano do séc. XVIII, autor, nas décadas 60, 70 e 80, de tratados pioneiros em toxicologia, como Ricerche fisiche sopra il veleno della vipera.

³ Médico e filósofo francês, contemporâneo de Fontana. De saúde frágil, era um médico que pesquisava muito e não clinicava, sendo portanto quase um metafísico da fisiologia. Suas idéias podem ser consideradas de uma amplitude tal que é, ainda, um psicólogo pré-Psicologia. Seu conceito de Vontade vital influenciaria fortemente Schopenhauer. Magnum opus: Lettre sur les causes premières (1824).

With opium, belladonna, brucaea, snake-wood¹, and the cherry-laurel², they put to sleep all who stand in their way. There is not one of those women, Egyptian, Turkish, or Greek, whom here you call <good women>, who do not know how, by means of chemistry, to stupefy a doctor, and in psychology to amaze a confessor.”

¹ Planta do gênero acácia comum em desertos do Oriente Médio e Austrália.

² Planta originária da vegetação costeira do Mar Morto.

the secret dramas of the East begin with a love philtre and end with a death potion – begin with paradise and end with – hell. There are as many elixirs of every kind as there are caprices and peculiarities in the physical and moral nature of humanity”

A man can easily be put out of the way there, then; it is, indeed, The Bagdad and Bassora of the <Thousand and One Nights>.”

at your theatres, by what at least I could judge by reading the pieces they play, they see persons swallow the contents of a phial, or suck the button of a ring, and fall dead instantly. 5 minutes afterwards the curtain falls, and the spectators depart. They are ignorant of the consequences of the murder; they see neither the police commissary with his badge of office, nor the corporal with his 4 men; and so the poor fools believe that the whole thing is as easy as lying. But go a little way from France – go either to Aleppo or Cairo, or only to Naples or Rome, and you will see people passing by you in the streets – people erect, smiling, and fresh-colored, of whom Asmodeus, if you were holding on by the skirt of his mantle, would say, <That man was poisoned 3 weeks ago; he will be a dead man in a month.>”

Ah, but madame, does mankind ever lose anything? The arts change about and make a tour of the world; things take a different name, and the vulgar do not follow them (…) Poisons at particularly on some organ or another – one on the stomach, another on the brain, another on the intestines. Well, the poison brings on a cough, the cough an inflammation of the lungs, or some other complaint catalogued in the book of science, which, however, by no means precludes it from being decidedly mortal; and if it were not, would be sure to become so, thanks to the remedies applied by foolish doctors, who are generally bad chemists, and which will act in favor of or against the malady, as you please; and then there is a human being killed according to all the rules of art and skill, and of whom justice learns nothing, as was said by a terrible chemist of my acquaintance, the worthy Abbé Adelmonte of Taormina, in Sicily, who has studied these national phenomena very profoundly.”

I thought, I must confess, that these tales, were inventions of the Middle Ages.”

What procureur has ever ventured to draw up an accusation against M. Magendie or M. Flourens², in consequence of the rabbits, cats, and guinea-pigs they have killed? – not one. So, then, the rabbit dies, and justice takes no notice. This rabbit dead, the Abbé Adelmonte has its entrails taken out by his cook and thrown on the dunghill; on this dunghill is a hen, who, pecking these intestines, is in her turn taken ill, and dies next day. At the moment when she is struggling in the convulsions of death, a vulture [espécie de urubu ou abutre] is flying by (there are a good many vultures in Adelmonte’s country); this bird darts on the dead fowl, and carries it away to a rock, where it dines off its prey. Three days afterwards, this poor vulture, which has been very much indisposed since that dinner, suddenly feels very giddly while flying aloft in the clouds, and falls heavily into a fish-pond. The pike, eels, and carp eat greedily always, as everybody knows – well, they feast on the vulture. Now suppose that next day, one of these eels, or pike, or carp, poisoned the fourth remove, is served up at your table. Well, then, your guest will be poisoned at fifth remove, and die, at the end of 8 or 10 days, of pains in the intestines, sickness, or abscess of the pylorus [piloro; músculo entre o estômago e o duodeno]. The doctors open the body and say with an air of profound learning, <The subject has died of a tumor on the liver, or of typhoid fever!>”

¹ Médico do XIX, vivisseccionista célebre pela radicalidade de seus experimentos, que chocaram até mesmo a comunidade científica de um período ainda não tão eticamente regulamentado quanto hoje.

² Médico do XIX especialista em anestesia; diferente de Gall, seu precursor em frenologia, utilizou animais como cobaias para fazer detalhadas comprovações.

But, she exclaimed, suddenly, arsenic is indelible, indestructible; in whatsoever way it is absorbed it will be found again in the body of the victim from the moment when it has been taken in sufficient quantity to cause death.”

<The fowl has not been poisoned – she had died of apoplexy. Apoplexy is a rare disease among fowls, I believe, but very commong among men.> Madame de Villefort appeared more and more thoughtful.

<It is very fortunate,> she observed, <that such substances could only be prepared by chemists; otherwise, all the world would be poisoning each other.>

<By chemists and persons who have a taste for chemistry,> said the Count of Monte Cristo caressly.”

The Orientals are stronger than we are in cases of conscience, and, very prudently, have no hell – that is the point.”

O lado ruim do pensamento humano vai ser sempre definido pelo paradoxo de Jean Jacques Rousseau – você deve saber, – o mandarim que é morto a 200km de distância por erguer a ponta do dedo. A vida inteira o homem passa fazendo essas coisas, e seu intelecto se exaure refletindo sobre elas. Você achará pouquíssimas pessoas que irão e enfiarão uma faca brutalmente no coração de seu companheiro ou irmão, ou que administrariam nele, para fazê-lo sumir da face da terra tão animada de vida, essa quantidade de arsênico de que falamos agora há pouco. Uma coisa dessas está realmente fora do normal – é excêntrico ou estúpido. Para chegar a esse ponto, o sangue deve ferver a 36º, o pulso deve estar, pelo menos, a 90, e os sentimentos, excitados além do limite ordinário.”

Thus Richard III, for instance, was marvellously served by his conscience after the putting away of the 2 children of Edward IV; in fact, he could say, <These 2 children of a cruel and persecuting king, who have inherited the vices of their father, which I alone could perceive in their juvenile propensities – these 2 children are impediments in my way of promoting the happiness of the English people, whose unhappiness they (the children) would infallibly have caused.> Thus was Lady Macbeth served by her conscience, when she sought to give her son, and not her husband (whatever Shakespeare may say), a throne. Ah, maternal love is a great virtue, a powerful motive – so powerful that it excuses a multitude of things, even if, after Duncan’s death, Lady Macbeth had been at all pricked by her conscience.”

Madame de Villefort listened with avidity to these appaling maxims and horrible paradoxes, delivered by the count with that ironical simplicity which was peculiar to him.”

As for me, so nervous, and so subject to fainting fits, I should require a Dr. Adelmonte to invent for me some means of breathing freely and tranquilizing my mind, in the fear I have of dying some fine day of suffocation.”

Only remember 1 thing – a small dose is a remedy, a large one is poison. 1 drop will restore life, as you have seen; 5 or 6 will inevitably kill, and in a way the more terrible inasmuch as, poured into a glass of wine, it would not in the slightest degree affect its flavor.”

He is a very strange man, and in my opinion is himself the Adelmonte he talks about.”

* * *

To no class of persons is the presentation of a gratuitous opera-box more acceptable than to the wealthy millionaire, who still hugs economy while boasting of carrying a king’s ransom in his waistcoat pocket.”

No, for that very ressemblance affrights me; I should have liked something more in the manner of the Venus of Milo or Capua; but this chase-loving Diana continually surrounded by her nymphs gives me a sort of alarm lest she should some day bring on me the fate of Acteon.” “she was beautiful, but her beauty was of too marked and decided a character to please a fastidious taste; her hair was raven black, but its natural waves seemed somewhat rebellious; her eyes of the same color as her hair, were surmounted by well-arched bows, whose great defect, however, consisted in an almost habitual frown, while her whole physiognomy wore that expression of firmness and decision so little in accordance with the gentler attributes of her sex”

But that which completed the almost masculine look Morcerf found so little to his taste, was a dark mole, of much larger dimensions than these freaks of nature generally are, placed just at the corner of her mouth” “She was a perfect linguist, a 1st-rate artist, wrote poetry, professed to be entirely devoted, following it with an indefatigable perseverance, assisted by a schoolfellow” “It was rumored that she was an object of almost paternal interest to one of the principal composers of the day, who excited her to spare no pains in the cultivation of her voice, which might hereafter prove a source of wealth and independence.”

Why, said Albert, he was talked about for a week; then the coronation of the queen of England took place, followed by the theft of Mademoiselle Mars’ diamonds; and so people talked of something else.”

He seems to have a mania for diamonds, and I verily believe that, like Potenkin, he keeps his pockets filled, for the sake of strewing them along the road, as Tom Thumb did his flint stones.”

No, no! exclaimed Debray; that girl is not his wife: he told us himself she was his slave. Do you not recollect, Morcerf, his telling us so at your breakfast?”

Ah, essa música, como produção humana, cantada por bípedes sem penas, está boa o bastante, para citar o velho Diógenes”

<quando eu desejo ouvir sons mais requintadamente consoantes com a melodia do que o ouvido mortal seria capaz de escutar, eu vou dormir.>

<Então durma aqui, meu querido conde. As condições são favoráveis; para o que mais inventaram a ópera?>

<Não, obrigado. Sua orquestra é muito barulhenta. Para dormir da maneira de que falo, calma e silêncio absolutos são precisos, e ainda certa preparação>–

<Eu sei – o famoso haxixe!>

<Precisamente. Destarte, meu querido visconde, sempre que quiser ser regalado com música de verdade, venha e jante comigo.>”

Haidée, cujo espírito parecia centrado nos negócios do palco, como todas as naturezas sem sofisticação, se deliciava com qualquer coisa que se insinuasse aos olhos ou aos ouvidos.”

Você observou, disse a Condessa G—— a Albert, que voltou para o seu lado, esse homem não faz nada como as outras pessoas; ele escuta com grande devoção o 3º ato de <Robert le Diable>, e quando começa o 4º ato, sai de contínuo.”

desinteresse é o raio mais rilhante em que uma espada nobre pode refletir.”

Ah, Haitians, – that is quite another thing! Haitians are the écarte of French stock-jobbing. We may like bouillote, delight in whist, be enraptured with boston, and yet grow tired of them all; but we always come back to écarte – it’s not only a game, it is a hors-d’oeuvre! M. Danglars sold yesterday at 405, and pockets 300.000 francs. Had he but waited till to-day, the price would have fallen to 205, and instead of gaining 300.000 francs, he would have lost 20 or 25.000.”

Você sabe que com banqueiros nada a não ser um documento escrito será válido.”

é cansativo bancar sempre o Manfredo. Eu desejo que minha vida seja livre e aberta.”

Você ouviu – Major Bartolomeo Cavalcanti – um homem que figura entre os nobres mais antigos de Itália, cujo nome foi celebrado no 10º canto do <Inferno> por Dante”

The acquaintances one makes in travelling have a sort of claim on one, they everywhere expect to receive the attention which you once paid them by chance, as though the civilities of a passing hour were likely to awaken any lasting interest in favor of the man in whose society you may happen to be thrown in the course of your journey.”

<Yes, he is to marry Mademoiselle de Villefort.>

<Indeed?>

<And you know I am to marry Mademoiselle Danglars,> said Albert, laughing.

<You smile.>

<Yes.>

<Why do you do so?>

<I smile because there appears to me to be about as much inclination for the consummation of the engagement in question as there is for my own. But really, my dear count, We are talking as much of women as they do of us; it is unpardonable>”

My servants seem to imitate those you sometimes see in a play, who, because they have only a word to say, aquit themselves in the most awkward manner possible.”

I should like you 100x better if, by your intervention, I could manage to remain a bachelor, even were it only for 10 years.”

Lucullus dines with Lucullus” ou o banquete-para-um.

Você deve saber que na França são muito particulares nesses pontos; não é o bastante, como na Itália, ir até o padre e dizer <Nós amamos 1 ao outro, e queremos que você nos case.> Casamento é um negócio civil na França, e a fim de se casar da maneira ortodoxa você precisa de papéis que estabeleçam inegavelmente sua identidade.”

<But what shall I wear?>

<What you find in your trunks.>

<In my trunks? I have but one portmanteau [mala].>

<I dare say you have nothing else with you. What is the use of losing one’s self with so many things? Besides an old soldier always likes to march with as little baggage as possible.>”

<Exactly so. Now, as I have never known any Sinbad, with the exception of the one celebrated in the ‘1001 Nights’>–

<Well, it is one of his descendants, and a great friend of mine; he is a very rich Englishman, eccentric almost to insanity, and his real name is Lord Wilmore.>”

I have, therefore, received a very good education, and have been treated by those kidnappers very much as the slaves were treated in Asia Minor, whose masters made them grammarians, doctors, and philosophers, in order that they might fetch a higher price in the Roman market.”

Você não pode controlar as circunstâncias, meu caro; <o homem propõe, e Deus dispõe>.”

<Does Mademoiselle Danglars object to this marriage with Monsieur de Morcerf on account of loving another?>

<I told you I was not on terms of strict intimacy with Eugenie.>

<Yes, but girls tell each other secrets without being particularly intimate; own, now, that you did question her on the subject. Ah, I see you are smiling.>”

She told me that she loved no one, said Valentine; that she disliked the idea of being married; that she would infinitely prefer leading an independent and unfettered life; and that she almost wished her father might lose his fortune; that she might become an artist, like her friend, Mademoiselle Louise d’Armilly.”

I never saw more simple tastes united to greater magnificence. His smile is so sweet when he addresses me, that I forget it ever can be bitter to others. Ah, Valentine, tell me, if he ever looked on you with one of those sweet smiles?”

Has the sun done anything for me? No, he warms me with his rays, and it is by his light that I see you – nothing more. Has such and such a perfume done anything for me? No; its odors charms one of my senses – that is all I can say when I am asked why I praise it. My friendship for him is as strange and unaccountable as his for me.”

A man who accustoms himself to live in such a world of poetry and imagination must find far too little excitement in a common, every-day sort of attachment such as ours.”

O que você está me dizendo? 900 mil francos? Essa é uma soma que poderia ser lamentada mesmo por um filósofo!”

Flora, a jovial e sorridente deusa dos jardineiros”

O Conde de Monte Cristo tinha visto o bastante. Todo homem tem uma paixão arrebatadora em seu coração, como cada fruta tem seu verme; a do homem-do-telégrafo era a horticultura.”

these Italians are well-named and badly dressed.”

I have only heard that an emperor of China had an oven built expressly, and that in this oven 12 jars like this were successively baked. 2 broke, from the heat of the fire; the other 10 were sunk 300 fathoms deep into the sea. The sea, knowing what was required of her, threw over them her weeds, encircled them with coral, and encrusted them with shells; the whole was cemented by 200 years beneath these almost impervious depths, for a revolution carried away the emperor who wished to make the trial, and only left the documents proving the manufacture of the jars and their descent into the sea. At the end of 200 years the documents were found, and they thought of bringing up the jars. Divers descended in machines, made expressly on the discovery, into the bay where they were thrown; but of 10 3 only remained, the rest having been broken by the waves.”

<Stop! You are in a shocking hurry to be off – you forget one of my guests. Lean a little to the left. Stay! look at M. Andrea Cavalcanti, the young man in a black coat, looking at Murillo’s Madonna; now he is turning.> This time Bertuccio would have uttered an exclamation had not a look from the Count of Monte Cristo silenced him. <Benedetto?> he muttered; <fatality!>”

you will admit that, when arrived at a certain degree of fortune, the superfluities of life are all that can be desired; and the ladies will allow that, after having risen to a certain eminence of position, the ideal alone can be more exalted.”

For example, you see these 2 fish; 1 brought from 50 leagues beyond St. Petersburg, the other 4 leagues from Naples. Is it not amusing to see them both on the same table?”

<Exactly: 1 comes from the Volga, and the other from Lake Fusaro.>

<Impossible!> cried all the guests simultaneously.

<Well, this is just what amuses me,> said the Count of Monte Cristo. <I am like Nero – cupitor impossibilium; and that is what is amusing you at this moment. This fish which seems so exquisite to you is very likely no better than perch or salmon; but it seemed impossible to procure it, and here it is.>”

<Pliny relates that they sent slaves from Ostia to Rome, who carried on their heads fish which he calls the muslus, and which, from the description, must probably be the goldfish. It was also considered a luxury to have them alive, it being an amusing sight to see them die, for, when dying, they chance color 3 or 4 times, and like the rainbow when it disappears, pass through all the prismatic shades, after which they were sent to the kitchen. Their agony formed part of their merit – if they were not seen alive, they were despised when dead.>

<Yes,> said Debray, <but then Ostia is only a few leagues from Rome.>

<True,> said the Count of Monte Cristo; <but what would be the use of living 18×100 years after Lucullus, if we can do no better than he could?>”

Elisabeth de Rossan, Marquise de Ganges, was one of the famous women of the court of Louis XIV where she was known as <La Belle Provençale>. She was the widow of the Marquise de Castellane when she married de Ganges, and having the misfortune to excite the enmity of her new brothers-in-law, was forced by them to take poison; and they finished her off with pistol and dagger.”

<Can you imagine>, said the Count of Monte Crisato, <some Othello or Abbé de Ganges, one stormy night, descending these stairs step by step, carrying a load, which he wishes to hide from the sight of man, if not from God?> Madame Danglars half fainted on the arm of Villefort, who was obliged to support himself against the wall.”

<What is done to infanticides in this country?> asked Major Cavalcanti innocently.

<Oh, their heads are soon cut off>, said Danglars.

<Ah, indeed?> said Cavalcanti.

<I think so, am I not right, M. de Villefort?> asked the Count of Monte Cristo.

<Yes, count>, replied Villefort, in a voice now scarcely human.”

Simpleton symptons

Melancholy in a capitalist, like the appearance of a comet, presages some misfortune to the world.”

She dreamed Don Carlos had returned to Spain; she believes in dreams. It is magnetism, she says, and when she dreams a thing it is sure to happen, she assures me.”

I make three assortments in fortune—first-rate, second-rate, and third-rate fortunes. I call those first-rate which are composed of treasures one possesses under one’s hand, such as mines, lands, and funded property, in such states as France, Austria, and England, provided these treasures and property form a total of about a hundred millions; I call those second-rate fortunes, that are gained by manufacturing enterprises, joint-stock companies, viceroyalties, and principalities, not drawing more than 1,500,000 francs, the whole forming a capital of about fifty millions; finally, I call those third-rate fortunes, which are composed of a fluctuating capital, dependent upon the will of others, or upon chances which a bankruptcy involves or a false telegram shakes, such as banks, speculations of the day—in fact, all operations under the influence of greater or less mischances, the whole bringing in a real or fictitious capital of about fifteen millions. I think this is about your position, is it not?”

We have our clothes, some more splendid than others,—this is our credit; but when a man dies he has only his skin; in the same way, on retiring from business, you have nothing but your real principal of about five or six millions, at the most; for third-rate fortunes are never more than a fourth of what they appear to be, like the locomotive on a railway, the size of which is magnified by the smoke and steam surrounding it. Well, out of the five or six millions which form your real capital, you have just lost nearly two millions, which must, of course, in the same degree diminish your credit and fictitious fortune; to follow out my s[i]mile, your skin has been opened by bleeding, and this if repeated three or four times will cause death—so pay attention to it, my dear Monsieur Danglars. Do you want money? Do you wish me to lend you some?

I have made up the loss of blood by nutrition. I lost a battle in Spain, I have been defeated in Trieste, but my naval army in India will have taken some galleons, and my Mexican pioneers will have discovered some mine.”

to involve me, three governments must crumble to dust.”

Well, such things have been.”

That there should be a famine!”

Recollect the seven fat and the seven lean kine.”

Or, that the sea should become dry, as in the days of Pharaoh, and even then my vessels would become caravans.”

So much the better. I congratulate you, my dear M. Danglars,” said Monte Cristo; “I see I was deceived, and that you belong to the class of second-rate fortunes.”

the sickly moons which bad artists are so fond of daubing into their pictures of ruins.”

But all the Italians are the same; they are like old Jews when they are not glittering in Oriental splendor.”

my opinion, I say, is, that they have buried their millions in corners, the secret of which they have transmitted only to their eldest sons, who have done the same from generation to generation; and the proof of this is seen in their yellow and dry appearance, like the florins of the republic, which, from being constantly gazed upon, have become reflected in them.”

Oh, that depends upon circumstances. I know an Italian prince, rich as a gold mine, one of the noblest families in Tuscany, who, when his sons married according to his wish, gave them millions; and when they married against his consent, merely allowed them thirty crowns a month. Should Andrea marry according to his father’s views, he will, perhaps, give him one, two, or three millions. For example, supposing it were the daughter of a banker, he might take an interest in the house of the father-in-law of his son; then again, if he disliked his choice, the major takes the key, double-locks his coffer, and Master Andrea would be obliged to live like the sons of a Parisian family, by shuffling cards or rattling the dice.”

Well, when I was a clerk, Morcerf was a mere fisherman.”

And then he was called——”

Fernand.”

Only Fernand?”

Fernand Mondego.”

You are sure?”

Pardieu! I have bought enough fish of him to know his name.”

Then, why did you think of giving your daughter to him?”

Because Fernand and Danglars, being both parvenus, both having become noble, both rich, are about equal in worth, excepting that there have been certain things mentioned of him that were never said of me.”

What?”

Oh, nothing!”

Ah, yes; what you tell me recalls to mind something about the name of Fernand Mondego. I have heard that name in Greece.”

In conjunction with the affairs of Ali Pasha?”

Exactly so.”

This is the mystery,” said Danglars. “I acknowledge I would have given anything to find it out.”

It would be very easy if you much wished it?”

How so?”

Probably you have some correspondent in Greece?”

I should think so.”

At Yanina?”

Everywhere.”

Well, write to your correspondent in Yanina, and ask him what part was played by a Frenchman named Fernand Mondego in the catastrophe of Ali Tepelini.”

You are right,” exclaimed Danglars, rising quickly, “I will write today.”

business-like persons pay very little attention to women, and Madame Danglars crossed the hall without exciting any more attention than any other woman calling upon her lawyer.”

it is true that every step in our lives is like the course of an insect on the sands;—it leaves its track! Alas, to many the path is traced by tears.”

 “Besides the pleasure, there is always remorse from the indulgence of our passions, and, after all, what have you men to fear from all this? the world excuses, and notoriety ennobles you.”

It is generally the case that what we most ardently desire is as ardently withheld from us by those who wish to obtain it, or from whom we attempt to snatch it. Thus, the greater number of a man’s errors come before him disguised under the specious form of necessity; then, after error has been committed in a moment of excitement, of delirium, or of fear, we see that we might have avoided and escaped it. The means we might have used, which we in our blindness could not see, then seem simple and easy, and we say, <Why did I not do this, instead of that?> Women, on the contrary, are rarely tormented with remorse; for the decision does not come from you,—your misfortunes are generally imposed upon you, and your faults the results of others’ crimes.

Chance?” replied Villefort; “No, no, madame, there is no such thing as chance.”

Oh, the wickedness of man is very great,” said Villefort, “since it surpasses the goodness of God. Did you observe that man’s eyes while he was speaking to us?”

No.”

But have you ever watched him carefully?”

did you ever reveal to anyone our connection?”

Never, to anyone.”

You understand me,” replied Villefort, affectionately; “when I say anyone,—pardon my urgency,—to anyone living I mean?”

Yes, yes, I understand very well,” ejaculated the baroness; “never, I swear to you.”

Were you ever in the habit of writing in the evening what had transpired in the morning? Do you keep a journal?”

No, my life has been passed in frivolity; I wish to forget it myself.”

Do you talk in your sleep?”

I sleep soundly, like a child; do you not remember?” The color mounted to the baroness’s face, and Villefort turned awfully pale.

It is true,” said he, in so low a tone that he could hardly be heard.

It was a strange thing that no one ever appeared to advance a step in that man’s favor. Those who would, as it were, force a passage to his heart, found an impassable barrier.”

And what is the news?”

You should not ask a stranger, a foreigner, for news.”

One may forsake a mistress, but a wife,—good heavens! There she must always be”

You are difficult to please, viscount.”

Yes, for I often wish for what is impossible.”

What is that?”

To find such a wife as my father found.” Monte Cristo turned pale, and looked at Albert, while playing with some magnificent pistols.

For any other son to have stayed with his mother for four days at Tréport, it would have been a condescension or a martyrdom, while I return, more contented, more peaceful—shall I say more poetic!—than if I had taken Queen Mab or Titania as my companion.”

That is what I call devoted friendship, to recommend to another one whom you would not marry yourself.”

I love everyone as God commands us to love our neighbor, as Christians; but I thoroughly hate but a few. Let us return to M. Franz d’Epinay. Did you say he was coming?”

those who remain in Paris in July must be true Parisians.”

That is very well before one is over forty. No, I do not dance, but I like to see others do so.”

One of his peculiarities was never to speak a word of French, which he however wrote with great facility.”

I am told it is a delightful place?”

It is a rock.”

And why has the count bought a rock?”

For the sake of being a count. In Italy one must have territorial possessions to be a count.”

Are you not his confessor?”

No, sir; I believe he is a Lutheran.”

He is a Quaker then?”

Exactly, he is a Quaker, with the exception of the peculiar dress.”

Has he any friends?”

Yes, everyone who knows him is his friend.”

But has he any enemies?”

One only.”

What is his name?”

Lord Wilmore.”

A investigação circular de Monsieur Villefaible…

Now, sir, I have but one question more to ask, and I charge you, in the name of honor, of humanity, and of religion, to answer me candidly.”

What is it, sir?”

Do you know with what design M. de Monte Cristo purchased a house at Auteuil?”

Certainly, for he told me.”

What is it, sir?”

To make a lunatic asylum of it, similar to that founded by the Count of Pisani at Palermo. Do you know about that institution?”

As the envoy of the prefect of police arrived ten minutes before ten, he was told that Lord Wilmore, who was precision and punctuality personified, was not yet come in, but that he would be sure to return as the clock struck.” (*) [VIDE MARCA POUCO ALÉM]

But as Lord Wilmore, in the character of the count’s enemy, was less restrained in his answers, they were more numerous; he described the youth of Monte Cristo, who he said, at ten years of age, entered the service of one of the petty sovereigns of India who make war on the English. It was there Wilmore had first met him and fought against him; and in that war Zaccone had been taken prisoner, sent to England, and consigned to the hulks, whence he had escaped by swimming. Then began his travels, his duels, his caprices; then the insurrection in Greece broke out, and he had served in the Grecian ranks. While in that service he had discovered a silver mine in the mountains of Thessaly, but he had been careful to conceal it from everyone. After the battle of Navarino, when the Greek government was consolidated, he asked of King Otho a mining grant for that district, which was given him. Hence that immense fortune, which, in Lord Wilmore’s opinion, possibly amounted to one or two millions per annum,—a precarious fortune, which might be momentarily lost by the failure of the mine.”

Hatred evidently inspired the Englishman, who, knowing no other reproach to bring on the count, accused him of avarice. “Do you know his house at Auteuil?”

Certainly.”

What do you know respecting it?”

Do you wish to know why he bought it?”

Yes.”

The count is a speculator, who will certainly ruin himself in experiments. He supposes there is in the neighborhood of the house he has bought a mineral spring equal to those at Bagnères, Luchon, and Cauterets. He is going to turn his house into a Badhaus, as the Germans term it. He has already dug up all the garden two or three times to find the famous spring, and, being unsuccessful, he will soon purchase all the contiguous houses. Now, as I dislike him, and hope his railway, his electric telegraph, or his search for baths, will ruin him, I am watching for his discomfiture, which must soon take place.”

I have already fought three duels with him,” said the Englishman, “the first with the pistol, the second with the sword, and the third with the sabre.”

Lord Wilmore, having heard the door close after him, returned to his bedroom, where with one hand he pulled off his light hair, his red whiskers, his false jaw, and his wound, to resume the black hair, dark complexion, and pearly teeth of the Count of Monte Cristo. It was M. de Villefort, and not the prefect, who returned to the house of M. de Villefort. (*) [???] He himself was the <envoy> [solução do miséterio], although the prefect was no more than an envoy of the King’s Attorney… Champsfort, consequently, continued his circularity with perfection & avidity…

You know that he has another name besides Monte Cristo?”

No, I did not know it.”

Monte Cristo is the name of an island, and he has a family name.”

I never heard it.”

Well, then, I am better informed than you; his name is Zaccone.”

It is possible.”

He is a Maltese.”

That is also possible.”

The son of a shipowner.”

Many men might have been handsomer, but certainly there could be none whose appearance was more significant, if the expression may be used. (…) Yet the Parisian world is so strange, that even all this might not have won attention had there not been connected with it a mysterious story gilded by an immense fortune.”

Albert,” she asked, “did you notice that?”

What, mother?”

That the count has never been willing to partake of food under the roof of M. de Morcerf.”

Yes; but then he breakfasted with me—indeed, he made his first appearance in the world on that occasion.”

But your house is not M. de Morcerf’s,” murmured Mercédès

Count,” added Mercédès with a supplicating glance, “there is a beautiful Arabian custom, which makes eternal friends of those who have together eaten bread and salt under the same roof.”

I know it, madame,” replied the count; “but we are in France, and not in Arabia, and in France eternal friendships are as rare as the custom of dividing bread and salt with one another.”

How can you exist thus without anyone to attach you to life?”

It is not my fault, madame. At Malta, I loved a young girl, was on the point of marrying her, when war came and carried me away. I thought she loved me well enough to wait for me, and even to remain faithful to my memory. When I returned she was married. This is the history of most men who have passed twenty years of age. Perhaps my heart was weaker than the hearts of most men, and I suffered more than they would have done in my place; that is all.” The countess stopped for a moment, as if gasping for breath. “Yes,” she said, “and you have still preserved this love in your heart—one can only love once—and did you ever see her again?”

MÍNIMA LISTA

Countless countesses

M. Count Comtempt

Countemporaneous

Aunt C.

instead of plunging into the mass of documents piled before him, M. Villefort opened the drawer of his desk, touched a spring, and drew out a parcel of cherished memoranda, amongst which he had carefully arranged, in characters only known to himself, the names of all those who, either in his political career, in money matters, at the bar, or in his mysterious love affairs, had become his enemies. § Their number was formidable, now that he had begun to fear, and yet these names, powerful though they were, had often caused him to smile with the same kind of satisfaction experienced by a traveller who from the summit of a mountain beholds at his feet the craggy eminences, the almost impassable paths, and the fearful chasms, through which he has so perilously climbed. When he had run over all these names in his memory, again read and studied them, commenting meanwhile upon his lists, he shook his head.

No,” he murmured, “none of my enemies would have waited so patiently and laboriously for so long a space of time, that they might now come and crush me with this secret. Sometimes, as Hamlet says—

Foul deeds will rise,

Though all the earth o’erwhelm them, to men’s eyes;’

Sujos feitos erguer-se-ão,

Muito embora toda a terra os soterre,

aos olhos dos homens

Hamlet

“—he cared little for that mene, mene, tekel upharsin, which appeared suddenly in letters of blood upon the wall;—but what he was really anxious for was to discover whose hand had traced them.” Referência bíblica. Segue explicação:

(source: Wiki)

Daniel reads the words, MENE, MENE, TEKEL, PARSIN, and interprets them for the king: MENE, God has numbered the days of your kingdom and brought it to an end; TEKEL, you have been weighed and found wanting; and PERES, the kingdom is divided and given to the Medes and Persians. <Then Belshazzar gave the command, and Daniel was clothed in purple, a chain of gold was put around his neck, and a proclamation was made … that he should rank third in the kingdom; [and] that very night Belshazzar the Chaldean (Babylonian) king was killed, and Darius the Mede received the kingdom.> (…) As Aramaic was written with consonants alone, they may have lacked any context in which to make sense of them. Daniel supplies vowels in two different ways, first reading the letters as nouns, then interpreting them as verbs. § The words Daniel reads are monetary weights: a mena, equivalent to a Jewish mina or 60 shekels, (several ancient versions have only one mena instead of two), a tekel, equivalent to a shekel, and parsin, meaning <half-pieces>. The last involves a word-play on the name of the Persians, suggesting not only that they are to inherit Belshazzar’s kingdom, but that they are two peoples, Medes and Persians. § Having read the words as nouns Daniel then interprets them as verbs, based on their roots: mina is interpreted as meaning <numbered>, tekel, from a root meaning to weigh, as meaning <weighed> (and found wanting), and peres, the singular form of dual parsin, from a root meaning to divide, as meaning the kingdom is to be <divided> and given to the Medes and Persians. (A curious point is that the various weights — a mina or sixty shekels, another shekel, and two half-shekels — add up to 62, which is noted in the last verse as the age of Darius the Mede).” RESUMO: “Seus dias estão contados…”

I cannot cry; at my age they say that we have no more tears,—still I think that when one is in trouble one should have the power of weeping.”

nothing frightens old people so much as when death relaxes its vigilance over them for a moment in order to strike some other old person.”

A stepmother is never a mother, sir. But this is not to the purpose,—our business concerns Valentine, let us leave the dead in peace.”

that theatrical formality invented to heighten the effect of a comedy called the signature of the contract”

It is an every-day occurrence for a gambler to lose not only what he possesses but also what he has not.”

I will, then, wait until the last moment, and when my misery is certain, irremediable, hopeless, I will write a confidential letter to my brother-in-law, another to the prefect of police, to acquaint them with my intention, and at the corner of some wood, on the brink of some abyss, on the bank of some river, I will put an end to my existence, as certainly as I am the son of the most honest man who ever lived in France.”

He shut himself in his room, and tried to read, but his eye glanced over the page without understanding a word, and he threw away the book, and for the second time sat down to sketch his plan (…) The garden became darker still, but in the darkness he looked in vain for the white dress, and in the silence he vainly listened for the sound of footsteps. The house, which was discernible through the trees, remained in darkness, and gave no indication that so important an event as the signature of a marriage-contract was going on. Morrel looked at his watch, which wanted a quarter to ten; but soon the same clock he had already heard strike two or three times rectified the error by striking half-past nine. § This was already half an hour past the time Valentine had fixed. It was a terrible moment for the young man. The slightest rustling of the foliage, the least whistling of the wind, attracted his attention, and drew the perspiration to his brow; then he tremblingly fixed his ladder, and, not to lose a moment, placed his foot on the first step. Amidst all these alternations of hope and fear, the clock struck ten. <It is impossible,> said Maximilian, <that the signing of a contract should occupy so long a time without unexpected interruptions. I have weighed all the chances, calculated the time required for all the forms; something must have happened.> And then he walked rapidly to and fro, and pressed his burning forehead against the fence. Had Valentine fainted? or had she been discovered and stopped in her flight? These were the only obstacles which appeared possible to the young man. (…) He even thought he could perceive something on the ground at a distance; he ventured to call, and it seemed to him that the wind wafted back an almost inarticulate sigh. (…) A light moved rapidly from time to time past three windows of the second floor. These three windows were in Madame de Saint-Méran’s room. Another remained motionless behind some red curtains which were in Madame de Villefort’s bedroom. Morrel guessed all this. So many times, in order to follow Valentine in thought at every hour in the day, had he made her describe the whole house, that without having seen it he knew it all.”

grief may kill, although it rarely does, and never in a day, never in an hour, never in ten minutes.”

Did you notice the symptoms of the disease to which Madame de Saint-Méran has fallen a victim?”

I did. Madame de Saint-Méran had three successive attacks, at intervals of some minutes, each one more serious than the former. When you arrived, Madame de Saint-Méran had already been panting for breath some minutes; she then had a fit, which I took to be simply a nervous attack, and it was only when I saw her raise herself in the bed, and her limbs and neck appear stiffened, that I became really alarmed. Then I understood from your countenance there was more to fear than I had thought. This crisis past, I endeavored to catch your eye, but could not. You held her hand—you were feeling her pulse—and the second fit came on before you had turned towards me. This was more terrible than the first; the same nervous movements were repeated, and the mouth contracted and turned purple.”

And at the third she expired.”

At the end of the first attack I discovered symptoms of tetanus; you confirmed my opinion.”

Yes, before others,” replied the doctor; “but now we are alone——“

What are you going to say? Oh, spare me!”

That the symptoms of tetanus and poisoning by vegetable substances are the same.” M. de Villefort started from his seat, then in a moment fell down again, silent and motionless.

Madame de Saint-Méran succumbed to a powerful dose of brucine or of strychnine, which by some mistake, perhaps, has been given to her.”

But how could a dose prepared for M. Noirtier poison Madame de Saint-Méran?”

Nothing is more simple. You know poisons become remedies in certain diseases, of which paralysis is one. For instance, having tried every other remedy to restore movement and speech to M. Noirtier, I resolved to try one last means, and for three months I have been giving him brucine; so that in the last dose I ordered for him there were six grains. This quantity, which is perfectly safe to administer to the paralyzed frame of M. Noirtier, which has become gradually accustomed to it, would be sufficient to kill another person.”

were you a priest I should not dare tell you that, but you are a man, and you know mankind.”

It cannot be wondered at that his mind, generally so courageous, but now disturbed by the two strongest human passions, love and fear, was weakened even to the indulgence of superstitious thoughts. Although it was impossible that Valentine should see him, hidden as he was, he thought he heard the shadow at the window call him; his disturbed mind told him so. This double error became an irresistible reality, and by one of the incomprehensible transports of youth, he bounded from his hiding-place, and with two strides, at the risk of being seen, at the risk of alarming Valentine, at the risk of being discovered by some exclamation which might escape the young girl, he crossed the flower-garden, which by the light of the moon resembled a large white lake, and having passed the rows of orange-trees which extended in front of the house, he reached the step, ran quickly up and pushed the door, which opened without offering any resistance. Valentine had not seen him. Her eyes, raised towards heaven, were watching a silvery cloud gliding over the azure, its form that of a shadow mounting towards heaven. Her poetic and excited mind pictured it as the soul of her grandmother. (…) Morrel was mad.”

A heart overwhelmed with one great grief is insensible to minor emotions.”

The weak man talks of burdens he can raise, the timid of giants he can confront, the poor of treasures he spends, the most humble peasant, in the height of his pride, calls himself Jupiter.”

It is said to have been a congestion of the brain, or apoplexy, which is the same thing, is it not?”

Nearly.”

You bend because your empire is a young stem, weakened by rapid growth. Take the Republic for a tutor; let us return with renewed strength to the battle-field, and I promise you 500,000 soldiers, another Marengo, and a second Austerlitz. Ideas do not become extinct, sire; they slumber sometimes, but only revive the stronger before they sleep entirely.” M. Noirtier a Napoleão

But tell me, said Beauchamp, what is life? Is it not a halt in Death’s anteroom?”

A moment later, Madame de Villefort entered the drawing-room with her little Edward. It was evident that she had shared the grief of the family, for she was pale and looked fatigued. She sat down, took Edward on her knees, and from time to time pressed this child, on whom her affections appeared centred, almost convulsively to her bosom.”

Old age is selfish, sir, and Mademoiselle de Villefort has been a faithful companion to M. Noirtier, which she cannot be when she becomes the Baroness d’Epinay. My father’s melancholy state prevents our speaking to him on any subjects, which the weakness of his mind would incapacitate him from understanding, and I am perfectly convinced that at the present time, although, he knows that his granddaughter is going to be married, M. Noirtier has even forgotten the name of his intended grandson.”

He was then informed of the contents of the letter from the Island of Elba, in which he was recommended to the club as a man who would be likely to advance the interests of their party. One paragraph spoke of the return of Bonaparte and promised another letter and further details, on the arrival of the Pharaon belonging to the shipbuilder Morrel, of Marseilles, whose captain was entirely devoted to the emperor.”

there was something awful in hearing the son read aloud in trembling pallor these details of his father’s death, which had hitherto been a mystery. Valentine clasped her hands as if in prayer. Noirtier looked at Villefort with an almost sublime expression of contempt and pride.”

The general fell, then, in a loyal duel, and not in ambush as it might have been reported. In proof of this we have signed this paper to establish the truth of the facts, lest the moment should arrive when either of the actors in this terrible scene should be accused of premeditated murder or of infringement of the laws of honor.”

<tell me the name of the president of the club, that I may at least know who killed my father.> Villefort mechanically felt for the handle of the door; Valentine, who understood sooner than anyone her grandfather’s answer, and who had often seen two scars upon his right arm, drew back a few steps. <Mademoiselle,> said Franz, turning towards Valentine, <unite your efforts with mine to find out the name of the man who made me an orphan at two years of age.> Valentine remained dumb and motionless.”

M, repeated Franz. The young man’s finger, glided over the words, but at each one Noirtier answered by a negative sign. Valentine hid her head between her hands. At length, Franz arrived at the word MYSELF.”

what is required of a young man in Paris? To speak its language tolerably, to make a good appearance, to be a good gamester, and to pay in cash.”

As for his wife, he bowed to her, as some husbands do to their wives, but in a way that bachelors will never comprehend, until a very extensive code is published on conjugal life.”

The two young ladies were seen seated on the same chair, at the piano, accompanying themselves, each with one hand, a fancy to which they had accustomed themselves, and performed admirably. Mademoiselle d’Armilly, whom they then perceived through the open doorway, formed with Eugénie one of the tableaux vivants of which the Germans are so fond. She was somewhat beautiful, and exquisitely formed—a little fairy-like figure, with large curls falling on her neck, which was rather too long, as Perugino sometimes makes his Virgins, and her eyes dull from fatigue. She was said to have a weak chest, and like Antonia in the Cremona Violin, she would die one day while singing. Monte Cristo cast one rapid and curious glance round this sanctum; it was the first time he had ever seen Mademoiselle d’Armilly, of whom he had heard much. <Well,> said the banker to his daughter, <are we then all to be excluded?> He then led the young man into the study, and either by chance or manœuvre the door was partially closed after Andrea, so that from the place where they sat neither the Count nor the baroness could see anything; but as the banker had accompanied Andrea, Madame Danglars appeared to take no notice of it.”

<Then you are wrong, madame. Fortune is precarious; and if I were a woman and fate had made me a banker’s wife, whatever might be my confidence in my husband’s good fortune, still in speculation you know there is great risk. Well, I would secure for myself a fortune independent of him, even if I acquired it by placing my interests in hands unknown to him.> Madame Danglars blushed, in spite of all her efforts. <Stay,> said Monte Cristo, as though he had not observed her confusion, <I have heard of a lucky hit that was made yesterday on the Neapolitan bonds.>”

<Yes,> said Monte Cristo, <I have heard that; but, as Claudius said to Hamlet, ‘it is a law of nature; their fathers died before them, and they mourned their loss; they will die before their children, who will, in their turn, grieve for them.’>”

How extraordinary! And how does M. de Villefort bear it?”

As usual. Like a philosopher.” Danglars returned at this moment alone. “Well,” said the baroness, “do you leave M. Cavalcanti with your daughter?”

And Mademoiselle d’Armilly,” said the banker; “do you consider her no one?” Then, turning to Monte Cristo, he said, “Prince Cavalcanti is a charming young man, is he not? But is he really a prince?”

HIERARQUIA DOS TÍTULOS DA NOBREZA-BURGUESIA OU CALEIDOSCÓPIO DA CLASSE ARISTOPLUTOCRÁTICA EUROPÉIA DOS “SÉCULOS DE OURO”:

Conde > Visconde > Duque > Barão > Baronete

OBS: A acepção Latina de <barão> é depreciativa.

it is so delightful to hear music in the distance, when the musicians are unrestrained by observation.”

He is a musician.”

So are all Italians.”

Come, count, you do not do that young man justice.”

Well, I acknowledge it annoys me, knowing your connection with the Morcerf family, to see him throw himself in the way.” Danglars burst out laughing.

What a Puritan you are!” said he; “that happens every day.”

But you cannot break it off in this way; the Morcerfs are depending on this union.”

Oh, my dear count, husbands are pretty much the same everywhere; an individual husband of any country is a pretty fair specimen of the whole race.”

Haydée—what an adorable name! Are there, then, really women who bear the name of Haydée anywhere but in Byron’s poems?”

Certainly there are. Haydée is a very uncommon name in France, but is common enough in Albania and Epirus; it is as if you said, for example, Chastity, Modesty, Innocence,—it is a kind of baptismal name, as you Parisians call it.”

Oh, that is charming,” said Albert, “how I should like to hear my countrywomen called Mademoiselle Goodness, Mademoiselle Silence, Mademoiselle Christian Charity! Only think, then, if Mademoiselle Danglars, instead of being called Claire-Marie-Eugénie, had been named Mademoiselle Chastity-Modesty-Innocence Danglars; what a fine effect that would have produced on the announcement of her marriage!”

How was it that Dionysius the Tyrant became a schoolmaster? The fortune of war, my dear viscount,—the caprice of fortune; that is the way in which these things are to be accounted for.”

Monte Cristo turned to Albert. <Do you know modern Greek,> asked he.

<Alas! no,> said Albert; <nor even ancient Greek, my dear count; never had Homer or Plato a more unworthy scholar than myself.>

Monte Cristo turned to Haydée, and with an expression of countenance which commanded her to pay the most implicit attention to his words, he said in Greek,—<Tell us the fate of your father; but neither the name of the traitor nor the treason.> Haydée sighed deeply, and a shade of sadness clouded her beautiful brow.”

that unsophisticated innocence of childhood which throws a charm round objects insignificant in themselves, but which in its eyes are invested with the greatest importance.”

things which in the evening look dark and obscure, appear but too clearly in the light of morning, and sometimes the utterance of one word, or the lapse of a single day, will reveal the most cruel calumnies.”

the breaking off of a marriage contract always injures the lady more than the gentleman.”

one must never be eccentric. If one’s lot is cast among fools, it is necessary to study folly.” “alguém nunca deve ser excêntrico. Se a alguém couber a mesma sorte que a dos loucos, é preciso estudar a loucura.”

Supposing the assertion to be really true?”

A son ought not to submit to such a stain on his father’s honor.”

Ma foi! we live in times when there is much to which we must submit.”

That is precisely the fault of the age.”

And do you undertake to reform it?”

Yes, as far as I am personally concerned.”

Well, you are indeed exacting, my dear fellow!”

Ah, but the friends of today are the enemies of tomorrow”

When you wish to obtain some concession from a man’s self-love, you must avoid even the appearance of wishing to wound it.”

It was a gloomy, dusty-looking apartment, such as journalists’ offices have always been from time immemorial.

I have heard it said that hearts inflamed by obstacles to their desire grew cold in time of security”

People die very suddenly in your house, M. de Villefort.”

Well, sir, you have in your establishment, or in your family, perhaps, one of the frightful monstrosities of which each century produces only one. Locusta and Agrippina, living at the same time, were an exception, and proved the determination of Providence to effect the entire ruin of the Roman empire, sullied by so many crimes. Brunhilda and Fredegund were the results of the painful struggle of civilization in its infancy, when man was learning to control mind, were it even by an emissary from the realms of darkness. All these women had been, or were, beautiful. The same flower of innocence had flourished, or was still flourishing, on their brow, that is seen on the brow of the culprit in your house.”

<Seek whom the crime will profit,> says an axiom of jurisprudence.”

Doctor,” cried Villefort, “alas, doctor, how often has man’s justice been deceived by those fatal words.

<Oh, man,> murmured d’Avrigny, <the most selfish of all animals, the most personal of all creatures, who believes the earth turns, the sun shines, and death strikes for him alone,—an ant cursing God from the top of a blade of grass!>

no one knows, not even the assassin, that, for the last twelve months, I have given M. Noirtier brucine for his paralytic affection, while the assassin is not ignorant, for he has proved that brucine is a violent poison.”

for when crime enters a dwelling, it is like death—it does not come alone.  (…) What does it signify to you if I am murdered? Are you my friend? Are you a man? Have you a heart? No, you are a physician!”

Ah, Caderousse,” said Andrea, “how covetous you are! Two months ago you were dying with hunger.”

The appetite grows by what it feeds on,” said Caderousse, grinning and showing his teeth, like a monkey laughing or a tiger growling.

That Count of Monte Cristo is an original, who loves to look at the sky even at night.”

those thieves of jewellers imitate so well that it is no longer worthwhile to rob a jeweller’s shop—it is another branch of industry paralyzed.”

From his past life, from his resolution to shrink from nothing, the count had acquired an inconceivable relish for the contests in which he had engaged, sometimes against nature, that is to say, against God, and sometimes against the world, that is, against the devil.”

The count felt his heart beat more rapidly. Inured as men may be to danger, forewarned as they may be of peril, they understand, by the fluttering of the heart and the shuddering of the frame, the enormous difference between a dream and a reality, between the project and the execution.” “and one might distinguish by the glimmering through the open panel that he wore a pliant tunic of steel mail, of which the last in France, where daggers are no longer dreaded, was worn by King Louis XVI, who feared the dagger at his breast, and whose head was cleft with a hatchet.”

So you would rob the Count of Monte Cristo?” continued the false abbé.

Reverend sir, I am impelled——”

Every criminal says the same thing.”

Poverty——”

Pshaw!” said Busoni disdainfully; “poverty may make a man beg, steal a loaf of bread at a baker’s door, but not cause him to open a secretary desk in a house supposed to be inhabited.”

Ah, reverend sir,” cried Caderousse, clasping his hands, and drawing nearer to Monte Cristo, “I may indeed say you are my deliverer!”

You mean to say you have been freed from confinement?”

Yes, that is true, reverend sir.”

Who was your liberator?”

An Englishman.”

What was his name?”

Lord Wilmore.”

I know him; I shall know if you lie.”

Ah, reverend sir, I tell you the simple truth.”

Was this Englishman protecting you?”

No, not me, but a young Corsican, my companion.”

What was this young Corsican’s name?”

Benedetto.”

Is that his Christian name?”

He had no other; he was a foundling.”

Then this young man escaped with you?”

He did.”

In what way?”

We were working at Saint-Mandrier, near Toulon. Do you know Saint-Mandrier?”

I do.”

In the hour of rest, between noon and one o’clock——”

Galley-slaves having a nap after dinner! We may well pity the poor fellows!” said the abbé.

Nay,” said Caderousse, “one can’t always work—one is not a dog.”

So much the better for the dogs,” said Monte Cristo.

While the rest slept, then, we went away a short distance; we severed our fetters with a file the Englishman had given us, and swam away.”

And what is become of this Benedetto?”

I don’t know.”

You ought to know.”

No, in truth; we parted at Hyères.” And, to give more weight to his protestation, Caderousse advanced another step towards the abbé, who remained motionless in his place, as calm as ever, and pursuing his interrogation. “You lie,” said the Abbé Busoni, with a tone of irresistible authority.

Reverend sir!”

You lie! This man is still your friend, and you, perhaps, make use of him as your accomplice.”

Oh, reverend sir!”

Since you left Toulon what have you lived on? Answer me!”

On what I could get.”

You lie,” repeated the abbé a third time, with a still more imperative tone. Caderousse, terrified, looked at the count. “You have lived on the money he has given you.”

True,” said Caderousse; “Benedetto has become the son of a great lord.”

How can he be the son of a great lord?”

A natural son.”

And what is that great lord’s name?”

The Count of Monte Cristo, the very same in whose house we are.”

Benedetto the count’s son?” replied Monte Cristo, astonished in his turn.

Well, I should think so, since the count has found him a false father—since the count gives him 4.000 francs a month, and leaves him 500.000 francs in his will.”

Ah, yes,” said the factitious abbé, who began to understand; “and what name does the young man bear meanwhile?”

Andrea Cavalcanti.”

Is it, then, that young man whom my friend the Count of Monte Cristo has received into his house, and who is going to marry Mademoiselle Danglars?”

Exactly.”

And you suffer that, you wretch—you, who know his life and his crime?”

Why should I stand in a comrade’s way?” said Caderousse.

You are right; it is not you who should apprise M. Danglars, it is I.”

Do not do so, reverend sir.”

Why not?”

Because you would bring us to ruin.”

And you think that to save such villains as you I will become an abettor of their plot, an accomplice in their crimes?”

Reverend sir,” said Caderousse, drawing still nearer.

I will expose all.”

To whom?”

To M. Danglars.”

By heaven!” cried Caderousse, drawing from his waistcoat an open knife, and striking the count in the breast, “you shall disclose nothing, reverend sir!” To Caderousse’s great astonishment, the knife, instead of piercing the count’s breast, flew back blunted. At the same moment the count seized with his left hand the assassin’s wrist, and wrung it with such strength that the knife fell from his stiffened fingers, and Caderousse uttered a cry of pain. But the count, disregarding his cry, continued to wring the bandit’s wrist, until, his arm being dislocated, he fell first on his knees, then flat on the floor. The count then placed his foot on his head, saying, “I know not what restrains me from crushing thy skull, rascal.”

Ah, mercy—mercy!” cried Caderousse. The count withdrew his foot. “Rise!” said he. Caderousse rose.

What a wrist you have, reverend sir!” said Caderousse, stroking his arm, all bruised by the fleshy pincers which had held it; “what a wrist!”

Silence! God gives me strength to overcome a wild beast like you; in the name of that God I act,—remember that, wretch,—and to spare thee at this moment is still serving him.”

Oh!” said Caderousse, groaning with pain.

Take this pen and paper, and write what I dictate.”

I don’t know how to write, reverend sir.”

You lie! Take this pen, and write!” Caderousse, awed by the superior power of the abbé, sat down and wrote:—

Sir,—The man whom you are receiving at your house, and to whom you intend to marry your daughter, is a felon who escaped with me from confinement at Toulon. He was Nº 59, and I Nº 58. He was called Benedetto, but he is ignorant of his real name, having never known his parents.

Sign it!” continued the count.

But would you ruin me?”

If I sought your ruin, fool, I should drag you to the first guard-house; besides, when that note is delivered, in all probability you will have no more to fear. Sign it, then!”

Caderousse signed it.

And you did not warn me!” cried Caderousse, raising himself on his elbows. “You knew I should be killed on leaving this house, and did not warn me!”

No; for I saw God’s justice placed in the hands of Benedetto, and should have thought it sacrilege to oppose the designs of Providence.”

God is merciful to all, as he has been to you; he is first a father, then a judge.”

Do you then believe in God?” said Caderousse.

Had I been so unhappy as not to believe in him until now,” said Monte Cristo, “I must believe on seeing you.” Caderousse raised his clenched hands towards heaven.

Help!” cried Caderousse; “I require a surgeon, not a priest; perhaps I am not mortally wounded—I may not die; perhaps they can yet save my life.”

Your wounds are so far mortal that, without the three drops I gave you, you would now be dead. Listen, then.”

Ah,” murmured Caderousse, “what a strange priest you are; you drive the dying to despair, instead of consoling them.”

I do not believe there is a God,” howled Caderousse; “you do not believe it; you lie—you lie!”

No,” said Caderousse, “no; I will not repent. There is no God; there is no Providence—all comes by chance.—”

Monte Cristo took off the wig which disfigured him, and let fall his black hair, which added so much to the beauty of his pallid features. <Oh?> said Caderousse, thunderstruck, <but for that black hair, I should say you were the Englishman, Lord Wilmore.>

<I am neither the Abbé Busoni nor Lord Wilmore,> said Monte Cristo; <think again,—do you not recollect me?> There was a magic effect in the count’s words, which once more revived the exhausted powers of the miserable man. <Yes, indeed,> said he; <I think I have seen you and known you formerly.>

<Yes, Caderousse, you have seen me; you knew me once.>

<Who, then, are you? and why, if you knew me, do you let me die?>

<Because nothing can save you; your wounds are mortal. Had it been possible to save you, I should have considered it another proof of God’s mercy, and I would again have endeavored to restore you, I swear by my father’s tomb.>

<By your father’s tomb!> said Caderousse, supported by a supernatural power, and half-raising himself to see more distinctly the man who had just taken the oath which all men hold sacred; <who, then, are you?> The count had watched the approach of death. He knew this was the last struggle. He approached the dying man, and, leaning over him with a calm and melancholy look, he whispered, <I am—I am——>

And his almost closed lips uttered a name so low that the count himself appeared afraid to hear it. Caderousse, who had raised himself on his knees, and stretched out his arm, tried to draw back, then clasping his hands, and raising them with a desperate effort, <O my God, my God!> said he, <pardon me for having denied thee; thou dost exist, thou art indeed man’s father in heaven, and his judge on earth. My God, my Lord, I have long despised thee!>”

<One!> said the count mysteriously, his eyes fixed on the corpse, disfigured by so awful a death.”

Bertuccio alone turned pale whenever Benedetto’s name was mentioned in his presence, but there was no reason why anyone should notice his doing so.”

the attempted robbery and the murder of the robber by his comrade were almost forgotten in anticipation of the approaching marriage of Mademoiselle Danglars to the Count Andrea Cavalcanti.”

some persons had warned the young man of the circumstances of his future father-in-law, who had of late sustained repeated losses; but with sublime disinterestedness and confidence the young man refused to listen, or to express a single doubt to the baron.”

With an instinctive hatred of matrimony, she suffered Andrea’s attentions in order to get rid of Morcerf; but when Andrea urged his suit, she betrayed an entire dislike to him. The baron might possibly have perceived it, but, attributing it to a caprice, feigned ignorance.”

in this changing age, the faults of a father cannot revert upon his children. Few have passed through this revolutionary period, in the midst of which we were born, without some stain of infamy or blood to soil the uniform of the soldier, or the gown of the magistrate. Now I have these proofs, Albert, and I am in your confidence, no human power can force me to a duel which your own conscience would reproach you with as criminal, but I come to offer you what you can no longer demand of me. Do you wish these proofs, these attestations, which I alone possess, to be destroyed? Do you wish this frightful secret to remain with us?”

he never interrogates, and in my opinion those who ask no questions are the best comforters.”

My papers, thank God, no,—my papers are all in capital order, because I have none”

do you come from the end of the world?” said Monte Cristo; “you, a journalist, the husband of renown? It is the talk of all Paris.”

Silence, purveyor of gossip”

Mademoiselle Eugénie, who appears but little charmed with the thoughts of matrimony, and who, seeing how little I was disposed to persuade her to renounce her dear liberty, retains any affection for me.”

I have told you, where the air is pure, where every sound soothes, where one is sure to be humbled, however proud may be his nature. I love that humiliation, I, who am master of the universe, as was Augustus.”

But where are you really going?”

To sea, viscount; you know I am a sailor. I was rocked when an infant in the arms of old Ocean, and on the bosom of the beautiful Amphitrite” “I love the sea as a mistress, and pine if I do not often see her.”

<Woman is fickle.> said Francis I; <woman is like a wave of the sea,> said Shakespeare; both the great king and the great poet ought to have known woman’s nature well.”

Woman’s, yes; my mother is not woman, but a woman.”

my mother is not quick to give her confidence, but when she does she never changes.”

You are certainly a prodigy; you will soon not only surpass the railway, which would not be very difficult in France, but even the telegraph.”

Precisely,” said the count; “six years since I bought a horse in Hungary remarkable for its swiftness. The 32 that we shall use tonight are its progeny; they are all entirely black, with the exception of a star upon the forehead.”

M. Albert. Tell me, why does a steward rob his master?”

Because, I suppose, it is his nature to do so, for the love of robbing.”

You are mistaken; it is because he has a wife and family, and ambitious desires for himself and them. Also because he is not sure of always retaining his situation, and wishes to provide for the future. Now, M. Bertuccio is alone in the world; he uses my property without accounting for the use he makes of it; he is sure never to leave my service.”

Why?”

Because I should never get a better.”

Probabilities are deceptive.”

But I deal in certainties; he is the best servant over whom one has the power of life and death.”

Do you possess that right over Bertuccio?”

Yes.”

There are words which close a conversation with an iron door; such was the count’s “yes.”

There, as in every spot where Monte Cristo stopped, if but for two days, luxury abounded and life went on with the utmost ease.”

Poor young man,” said Monte Cristo in a low voice; “it is then true that the sin of the father shall fall on the children to the third and fourth generation.”

Five minutes had sufficed to make a complete transformation in his appearance. His voice had become rough and hoarse; his face was furrowed with wrinkles; his eyes burned under the blue-veined lids, and he tottered like a drunken man. <Count,> said he, <I thank you for your hospitality, which I would gladly have enjoyed longer; but I must return to Paris.>

<What has happened?>

<A great misfortune, more important to me than life. Don’t question me, I beg of you, but lend me a horse.>

<My stables are at your command, viscount; but you will kill yourself by riding on horseback. Take a post-chaise or a carriage.>”

The Count of Morcerf was no favorite with his colleagues. Like all upstarts, he had had recourse to a great deal of haughtiness to maintain his position. The true nobility laughed at him, the talented repelled him, and the honorable instinctively despised him. He was, in fact, in the unhappy position of the victim marked for sacrifice; the finger of God once pointed at him, everyone was prepared to raise the hue and cry.”

Moral wounds have this peculiarity,—they may be hidden, but they never close; always painful, always ready to bleed when touched, they remain fresh and open in the heart.”

He thought himself strong enough, for he mistook fever for energy.”

I, El-Kobbir, a slave-merchant, and purveyor of the harem of his highness, acknowledge having received for transmission to the sublime emperor, from the French lord, the Count of Monte Cristo, an emerald valued at 800.000 francs; as the ransom of a young Christian slave of 11 years of age, named Haydée, the acknowledged daughter of the late lord Ali Tepelini, pasha of Yanina, and of Vasiliki, his favorite; she having been sold to me 7 years previously, with her mother, who had died on arriving at Constantinople, by a French colonel in the service of the Vizier Ali Tepelini, named Fernand Mondego. The above-mentioned purchase was made on his highness’s account, whose mandate I had, for the sum of 400.000 francs.

Given at Constantinople, by authority of his highness, in the year 1247 of the Hegira.

Signed El-Kobbir.

I am ignorant of nothing which passes in the world. I learn all in the silence of my apartments,—for instance, I see all the newspapers, every periodical, as well as every new piece of music; and by thus watching the course of the life of others, I learned what had transpired this morning in the House of Peers, and what was to take place this evening; then I wrote.”

Then,” remarked the president, “the Count of Monte Cristo knows nothing of your present proceedings?”—“He is quite unaware of them, and I have but one fear, which is that he should disapprove of what I have done. But it is a glorious day for me,” continued the young girl, raising her ardent gaze to heaven, “that on which I find at last an opportunity of avenging my father!”

Gentlemen,” said the president, when silence was restored, “is the Count of Morcerf convicted of felony, treason, and conduct unbecoming a member of this House?”—“Yes,” replied all the members of the committee of inquiry with a unanimous voice.

leave Paris—all is soon forgotten in this great Babylon of excitement and changing tastes. You will return after 3 or years with a Russian princess for a bride, and no one will think more of what occurred yesterday than if it had happened 16 years ago.”

Yes; M. Danglars is a money-lover, and those who love money, you know, think too much of what they risk to be easily induced to fight a duel. The other is, on the contrary, to all appearance a true nobleman; but do you not fear to find him a bully?”

I only fear one thing; namely, to find a man who will not fight.”

The count had, indeed, just arrived, but he was in his bath, and had forbidden that anyone should be admitted. “But after his bath?” asked Morcerf.

My master will go to dinner.”

And after dinner?”

He will sleep an hour.”

Then?”

He is going to the Opera.”

You know, mother, M. de Monte Cristo is almost an Oriental, and it is customary with the Orientals to secure full liberty for revenge by not eating or drinking in the houses of their enemies.”

Well,” cried he, with that benevolent politeness which distinguished his salutation from the common civilities of the world, “my cavalier has attained his object. Good-evening, M. de Morcerf.” 

Display is not becoming to everyone, M. de Morcerf.”

Wild, almost unconscious, and with eyes inflamed, Albert stepped back, and Morrel closed the door. Monte Cristo took up his glass again as if nothing had happened; his face was like marble, and his heart was like bronze. Morrel whispered, <What have you done to him?>”

listen how adorably Duprez is singing that line,—

<O Mathilde! idole de mon âme!>

I was the first to discover Duprez at Naples, and the first to applaud him. Bravo, bravo!” Morrel saw it was useless to say more, and refrained.

Doubtless you wish to make me appear a very eccentric character. I am, in your opinion, a Lara, a Manfred, a Lord Ruthven; then, just as I am arriving at the climax, you defeat your own end, and seek to make an ordinary man of me. You bring me down to your own level, and demand explanations! Indeed, M. Beauchamp, it is quite laughable.”

the Count of Monte Cristo bows to none but the Count of Monte Cristo himself. Say no more, I entreat you. I do what I please, M. Beauchamp, and it is always well done.”

It is quite immaterial to me,” said Monte Cristo, “and it was very unnecessary to disturb me at the Opera for such a trifle. In France people fight with the sword or pistol, in the colonies with the carbine, in Arabia with the dagger. Tell your client that, although I am the insulted party, in order to carry out my eccentricity, I leave him the choice of arms, and will accept without discussion, without dispute, anything, even combat by drawing lots, which is always stupid, but with me different from other people, as I am sure to gain.”

the music of William Tell¹ is so sweet.”

¹ Herói lendário, ligado à formação da Suíça. Está mais para um Robin Hood que para um Aquiles, no entanto.

Monte Cristo waited, according to his usual custom, until Duprez had sung his famous <Suivez-moi!> then he rose and went out.”

Edmond, you will not kill my son?” The count retreated a step, uttered a slight exclamation, and let fall the pistol he held.

Fernand, do you mean?” replied Monte Cristo, with bitter irony; “since we are recalling names, let us remember them all.”

Listen to me, my son has also guessed who you are,—he attributes his father’s misfortunes to you.”

Madame, you are mistaken, they are not misfortunes,—it is a punishment.”

What are Yanina and its vizier to you, Edmond? What injury has Fernand Mondego done you in betraying Ali Tepelini?”

Ah, sir!” cried the countess, “how terrible a vengeance for a fault which fatality made me commit!—for I am the only culprit, Edmond, and if you owe revenge to anyone, it is to me, who had not fortitude to bear your absence and my solitude.”

But,” exclaimed Monte Cristo, “why was I absent? And why were you alone?”

Because you had been arrested, Edmond, and were a prisoner.”

And why was I arrested? Why was I a prisoner?”

I do not know,” said Mercédès.

You do not, madame; at least, I hope not. But I will tell you. I was arrested and became a prisoner because, under the arbor of La Réserve, the day before I was to marry you, a man named Danglars wrote this letter, which the fisherman Fernand himself posted.”

Monte Cristo went to a secretary desk, opened a drawer by a spring, from which he took a paper which had lost its original color, and the ink of which had become of a rusty hue—this he placed in the hands of Mercédès. It was Danglars’ letter to the king’s attorney, which the Count of Monte Cristo, disguised as a clerk from the house of Thomson & French, had taken from the file against Edmond Dantes, on the day he had paid the two hundred thousand francs to M. de Boville. Mercédès read with terror the following lines:—

The king”s attorney is informed by a friend to the throne and religion that one Edmond Dantes, second in command on board the Pharaon, this day arrived from Smyrna, after having touched at Naples and Porto-Ferrajo, is the bearer of a letter from Murat to the usurper, and of another letter from the usurper to the Bonapartist club in Paris. Ample corroboration of this statement may be obtained by arresting the above-mentioned Edmond Dantès, who either carries the letter for Paris about with him, or has it at his father’s abode. Should it not be found in possession of either father or son, then it will assuredly be discovered in the cabin belonging to the said Dantes on board the Pharaon.”

You well know, madame, was my arrest; but you do not know how long that arrest lasted. You do not know that I remained for fourteen years within a quarter of a league of you, in a dungeon in the Château d’If. You do not know that every day of those fourteen years I renewed the vow of vengeance which I had made the first day; and yet I was not aware that you had married Fernand, my calumniator, and that my father had died of hunger!”

Can it be?” cried Mercédès, shuddering.

That is what I heard on leaving my prison fourteen years after I had entered it; and that is why, on account of the living Mercédès and my deceased father, I have sworn to revenge myself on Fernand, and—I have revenged myself.”

besides, that is not much more odious than that a Frenchman by adoption should pass over to the English; that a Spaniard by birth should have fought against the Spaniards; that a stipendiary of Ali should have betrayed and murdered Ali. Compared with such things, what is the letter you have just read?—a lover’s deception, which the woman who has married that man ought certainly to forgive; but not so the lover who was to have married her.” 

Not crush that accursed race?” murmured he; “abandon my purpose at the moment of its accomplishment? Impossible, madame, impossible!”

Revenge yourself, then, Edmond,” cried the poor mother; “but let your vengeance fall on the culprits,—on him, on me, but not on my son!”

It is written in the good book,” said Monte Cristo, “that the sins of the fathers shall fall upon their children to the third and fourth generation. Since God himself dictated those words to his prophet, why should I seek to make myself better than God?”

Listen; for ten years I dreamed each night the same dream. I had been told that you had endeavored to escape; that you had taken the place of another prisoner; that you had slipped into the winding sheet of a dead body; that you had been thrown alive from the top of the Château d’If, and that the cry you uttered as you dashed upon the rocks first revealed to your jailers that they were your murderers. Well, Edmond, I swear to you, by the head of that son for whom I entreat your pity,—Edmond, for ten years I saw every night every detail of that frightful tragedy, and for ten years I heard every night the cry which awoke me, shuddering and cold.”

What I most loved after you, Mercédès, was myself, my dignity, and that strength which rendered me superior to other men; that strength was my life. With one word you have crushed it, and I die.”

it is melancholy to pass one’s life without having one joy to recall, without preserving a single hope; but that proves that all is not yet over. No, it is not finished; I feel it by what remains in my heart. Oh, I repeat it, Edmond; what you have just done is beautiful—it is grand; it is sublime.”

suppose that when everything was in readiness and the moment had come for God to look upon his work and see that it was good—suppose he had snuffed out the sun and tossed the world back into eternal night—then—even then, Mercédès, you could not imagine what I lose in sacrificing my life at this moment.”

What a fool I was,” said he, “not to tear my heart out on the day when I resolved to avenge myself!”

MOMENT OF HESITATION

what? this edifice which I have been so long preparing, which I have reared with so much care and toil, is to be crushed by a single touch, a word, a breath! Yes, this self, of whom I thought so much, of whom I was so proud, who had appeared so worthless in the dungeons of the Château d’If, and whom I had succeeded in making so great, will be but a lump of clay tomorrow. Alas, it is not the death of the body I regret; for is not the destruction of the vital principle, the repose to which everything is tending, to which every unhappy being aspires,—is not this the repose of matter after which I so long sighed, and which I was seeking to attain by the painful process of starvation when Faria appeared in my dungeon? What is death for me? One step farther” But now is time to set back once again…

It is not God’s will that they should be accomplished.”

Oh, shall I then, again become a fatalist, whom fourteen years of despair and ten of hope had rendered a believer in Providence? And all this—all this, because my heart, which I thought dead, was only sleeping; because it has awakened and has begun to beat again, because I have yielded to the pain of the emotion excited in my breast by a woman’s voice.

yet, it is impossible that so noble-minded a woman should thus through selfishness consent to my death when I am in the prime of life and strength; it is impossible that she can carry to such a point maternal love, or rather delirium. There are virtues which become crimes by exaggeration. No, she must have conceived some pathetic scene; she will come and throw herself between us; and what would be sublime here will there appear ridiculous.”

I ridiculous? No, I would rather die.”

By thus exaggerating to his own mind the anticipated ill-fortune of the next day, to which he had condemned himself by promising Mercédès to spare her son, the count at last exclaimed, “Folly, folly, folly!—to carry generosity so far as to put myself up as a mark for that young man to aim at. He will never believe that my death was suicide; and yet it is important for the honor of my memory,—and this surely is not vanity, but a justifiable pride,—it is important the world should know that I have consented, by my free will, to stop my arm, already raised to strike, and that with the arm which has been so powerful against others I have struck myself. It must be; it shall be.” She remembered that she had a son, said he; and I forgot I had a daughter.

and seeing that sweet pale face, those lovely eyes closed, that beautiful form motionless and to all appearance lifeless, the idea occurred to him for the first time, that perhaps she loved him otherwise than as a daughter loves a father.”

I said to myself that justice must be on your side, or man’s countenance is no longer to be relied on.”

But what has happened, then, since last evening, count?”

The same thing that happened to Brutus the night before the battle of Philippi; I have seen a ghost.”

And that ghost——”

Told me, Morrel, that I had lived long enough.”

Do I regret life? What is it to me, who have passed twenty years between life and death? (…) I know the world is a drawing-room, from which we must retire politely and honestly; that is, with a bow, and our debts of honor paid.”

<I say, and proclaim it publicly, that you were justified in revenging yourself on my father, and I, his son, thank you for not using greater severity.>

Had a thunderbolt fallen in the midst of the spectators of this unexpected scene, it would not have surprised them more than did Albert’s declaration. As for Monte Cristo, his eyes slowly rose towards heaven with an expression of infinite gratitude. He could not understand how Albert’s fiery nature, of which he had seen so much among the Roman bandits, had suddenly stooped to this humiliation.”

Next to the merit of infallibility which you appear to possess, I rank that of candidly acknowledging a fault. But this confession concerns me only. I acted well as a man, but you have acted better than man.”

Providence still,” murmured he; “now only am I fully convinced of being the emissary of God!”

nothing induces serious duels so much as a duel forsworn.”

Mother,” said Albert with firmness. “I cannot make you share the fate I have planned for myself. I must live henceforth without rank and fortune, and to begin this hard apprenticeship I must borrow from a friend the loaf I shall eat until I have earned one. So, my dear mother, I am going at once to ask Franz to lend me the small sum I shall require to supply my present wants.”

I know that from the gulf in which their enemies have plunged them they have risen with so much vigor and glory that in their turn they have ruled their former conquerors, and have punished them.”

You had friends, Albert; break off their acquaintance. But do not despair; you have life before you, my dear Albert, for you are yet scarcely 22 years old; and as a pure heart like yours wants a spotless name, take my father’s—it was Herrera.”

Providence is not willing that the innocent should suffer for the guilty.”

Oh,” said the count, “I only know two things which destroy the appetite,—grief—and as I am happy to see you very cheerful, it is not that—and love.”

Every transport of a daughter finding a father, all the delight of a mistress seeing an adored lover, were felt by Haydée during the first moments of this meeting, which she had so eagerly expected. Doubtless, although less evident, Monte Cristo’s joy was not less intense. Joy to hearts which have suffered long is like the dew on the ground after a long drought; both the heart and the ground absorb that beneficent moisture falling on them, and nothing is outwardly apparent.

Monte Cristo was beginning to think, what he had not for a long time dared to believe, that there were two Mercédès in the world, and he might yet be happy.

We must explain this visit, which although expected by Monte Cristo, is unexpected to our readers.”

you know the guilty do not like to find themselves convicted.”

You call yourself, in Paris, the Count of Monte Cristo; in Italy, Sinbad the Sailor; in Malta, I forget what. But it is your real name I want to know, in the midst of your hundred names, that I may pronounce it when we meet to fight, at the moment when I plunge my sword through your heart.”

he uttered the most dreadful sob which ever escaped from the bosom of a father abandoned at the same time by his wife and son.”

Do you then really suffer?” asked Morrel quickly.

Oh, it must not be called suffering; I feel a general uneasiness, that is all. I have lost my appetite, and my stomach feels as if it were struggling to get accustomed to something.” Noirtier did not lose a word of what Valentine said. “And what treatment do you adopt for this singular complaint?”

A very simple one,” said Valentine. “I swallow every morning a spoonful of the mixture prepared for my grandfather. When I say one spoonful, I began by one—now I take four. Grandpapa says it is a panacea.” Valentine smiled, but it was evident that she suffered.

Maximilian, in his devotedness, gazed silently at her. She was very beautiful, but her usual pallor had increased; her eyes were more brilliant than ever, and her hands, which were generally white like mother-of-pearl, now more resembled wax, to which time was adding a yellowish hue.

Noirtier raised his eyes to heaven, as a gambler does who stakes his all on one stroke.”

since I am to be married whether I will or not, I ought to be thankful to Providence for having released me from my engagement with M. Albert de Morcerf, or I should this day have been the wife of a dishonored man.”

D’Avrigny’s look implied, “I told you it would be so.” Then he slowly uttered these words, “Who is now dying in your house? What new victim is going to accuse you of weakness before God?” A mournful sob burst from Villefort’s heart; he approached the doctor, and seizing his arm,—“Valentine,” said he, “it is Valentine’s turn!”

Your daughter!” cried d’Avrigny with grief and surprise.

a dead father or husband is better than a dishonored one,—blood washes out shame.”

You say an exterminating angel appears to have devoted that house to God’s anger—well, who says your supposition is not reality?”

Conscience, what hast thou to do with me?” as Sterne said.

See,” said he, “my dear friend, how God punishes the most thoughtless and unfeeling men for their indifference, by presenting dreadful scenes to their view. (…) I, who like a wicked angel was laughing at the evil men committed protected by secrecy (a secret is easily kept by the rich and powerful), I am in my turn bitten by the serpent whose tortuous course I was watching, and bitten to the heart!”

What does the angel of light or the angel of darkness say to that mind, at once implacable and generous? God only knows.”

Oh, count, you overwhelm me with that coolness. Have you, then, power against death? Are you superhuman? Are you an angel?”

To the world and to his servants Danglars assumed the character of the good-natured man and the indulgent father. This was one of his parts in the popular comedy he was performing,—a make-up he had adopted and which suited him about as well as the masks worn on the classic stage by paternal actors, who seen from one side, were the image of geniality, and from the other showed lips drawn down in chronic ill-temper. Let us hasten to say that in private the genial side descended to the level of the other, so that generally the indulgent man disappeared to give place to the brutal husband and domineering father.”

Cavalcanti may appear to those who look at men’s faces and figures as a very good specimen of his kind. It is not, either, that my heart is less touched by him than any other; that would be a schoolgirl’s reason, which I consider quite beneath me. I actually love no one, sir; you know it, do you not? I do not then see why, without real necessity, I should encumber my life with a perpetual companion. Has not some sage said, <Nothing too much>? and another, <I carry all my effects with me>? I have been taught these two aphorisms in Latin and in Greek; one is, I believe, from Phædrus, and the other from Bias. (…) life is an eternal shipwreck of our hopes”

The world calls me beautiful. It is something to be well received. I like a favorable reception; it expands the countenance, and those around me do not then appear so ugly. I possess a share of wit, and a certain relative sensibility, which enables me to draw from life in general, for the support of mine, all I meet with that is good, like the monkey who cracks the nut to get at its contents. I am rich, for you have one of the first fortunes in France. I am your only daughter, and you are not so exacting as the fathers of the Porte Saint-Martin and Gaîté, who disinherit their daughters for not giving them grandchildren. Besides, the provident law has deprived you of the power to disinherit me, at least entirely, as it has also of the power to compel me to marry Monsieur This or Monsieur That. And so—being, beautiful, witty, somewhat talented, as the comic operas say, and rich—and that is happiness, sir—why do you call me unhappy?”

Eugénie looked at Danglars, much surprised that one flower of her crown of pride, with which she had so superbly decked herself, should be disputed.”

I do not willingly enter into arithmetical explanations with an artist like you, who fears to enter my study lest she should imbibe disagreeable or anti-poetic impressions and sensations.”

the credit of a banker is his physical and moral life; that credit sustains him as breath animates the body”

as credit sinks, the body becomes a corpse, and this is what must happen very soon to the banker who is proud to own so good a logician as you for his daughter.” But Eugénie, instead of stooping, drew herself up under the blow. “Ruined?” said she.

Yes, ruined! Now it is revealed, this secret so full of horror, as the tragic poet says. Now, my daughter, learn from my lips how you may alleviate this misfortune, so far as it will affect you.””

Oh,” cried Eugénie, “you are a bad physiognomist, if you imagine I deplore on my own account the catastrophe of which you warn me. I ruined? and what will that signify to me? Have I not my talent left? Can I not, like Pasta¹, Malibran², Grisi³, acquire for myself what you would never have given me, whatever might have been your fortune, 100 or 150.000 livres per annum, for which I shall be indebted to no one but myself; and which, instead of being given as you gave me those poor 12.000 francs, with sour looks and reproaches for my prodigality, will be accompanied with acclamations, with bravos, and with flowers? And if I do not possess that talent, which your smiles prove to me you doubt, should I not still have that ardent love of independence, which will be a substitute for wealth, and which in my mind supersedes even the instinct of self-preservation? No, I grieve not on my own account, I shall always find a resource; my books, my pencils, my piano, all the things which cost but little, and which I shall be able to procure, will remain my own.

¹ Giuditta Pasta, soprano italiana do século XIX.

² Maria Malibran, mezzo-soprano espanhola, foi contemporânea de G. Pasta, mas só viveu 28 anos.

³ Outra mezzo-soprano de família abastada e freqüente nas óperas de Rossini. Na verdade, a dúvida é se se trata de Giuditta ou Giulia, a caçula, ambas muito talentosas.

From my earliest recollections, I have been beloved by no one—so much the worse; that has naturally led me to love no one—so much the better—now you have my profession of faith.”

I do not despise bankruptcies, believe me, but they must be those which enrich, not those which ruin.”

Five minutes afterwards the piano resounded to the touch of Mademoiselle d’Armilly’s fingers, and Mademoiselle Danglars was singing Brabantio’s malediction on Desdemona¹.

¹ Ou “Brabanzio”. Trata-se de uma cena do Otelo de Shakespeare.

Without reckoning,” added Monte Cristo, “that he is on the eve of entering into a sort of speculation already in vogue in the United States and in England, but quite novel in France.”

Yes, yes, I know what you mean,—the railway, of which he has obtained the grant, is it not?”

Precisely; it is generally believed he will gain ten millions by that affair.”

Ten millions! Do you think so? It is magnificent!” said Cavalcanti, who was quite confounded at the metallic sound of these golden words.

Well, you must become a diplomatist; diplomacy, you know, is something that is not to be acquired; it is instinctive. Have you lost your heart?”

This calm tone and perfect ease made Andrea feel that he was, for the moment, restrained by a more muscular hand than his own, and that the restraint could not be easily broken through.”

What is it?”

Advice.”

Be careful; advice is worse than a service.”

An Academician would say that the entertainments of the fashionable world are collections of flowers which attract inconstant butterflies, famished bees, and buzzing drones.”

At the moment when the hand of the massive time-piece, representing Endymion asleep, pointed to nine on its golden face, and the hammer, the faithful type of mechanical thought, struck nine times, the name of the Count of Monte Cristo resounded in its turn, and as if by an electric shock all the assembly turned towards the door.”

Having accomplished these three social duties, Monte Cristo stopped, looking around him with that expression peculiar to a certain class, which seems to say, <I have done my duty, now let others do theirs.>”

all were eager to speak to him, as is always the case with those whose words are few and weighty.”

Mademoiselle Danglars’ charms were heightened in the opinion of the young men, and for the moment seemed to outvie the sun in splendor. As for the ladies, it is needless to say that while they coveted the millions, they thought they did not need them for themselves, as they were beautiful enough without them.”

But at the same instant the crowd of guests rushed in alarm into the principal salon as if some frightful monster had entered the apartments, quærens quem devoret [procurando quem devorar]. There was, indeed, reason to retreat, to be alarmed, and to scream. An officer was placing two soldiers at the door of each drawing-room, and was advancing towards Danglars, preceded by a commissary of police, girded with his scarf.”

What is the matter, sir?” asked Monte Cristo, advancing to meet the commissioner.

Which of you gentlemen,” asked the magistrate, without replying to the count, “answers to the name of Andrea Cavalcanti?” A cry of astonishment was heard from all parts of the room. They searched; they questioned. “But who then is Andrea Cavalcanti?” asked Danglars in amazement.

A galley-slave, escaped from confinement at Toulon.”

And what crime has he committed?”

He is accused,” said the commissary with his inflexible voice, “of having assassinated the man named Caderousse, his former companion in prison, at the moment he was making his escape from the house of the Count of Monte Cristo.” Monte Cristo cast a rapid glance around him. Andrea was gone.

Oh, do not confound the two, Eugénie.”

Hold your tongue! The men are all infamous, and I am happy to be able now to do more than detest them—I despise them.”

Oh, I am done with considering! I am tired of hearing only of market reports, of the end of the month, of the rise and fall of Spanish funds, of Haitian bonds. Instead of that, Louise—do you understand?—air, liberty, melody of birds, plains of Lombardy, Venetian canals, Roman palaces, the Bay of Naples. How much have we, Louise?”

that deep sleep which is sure to visit men of twenty years of age, even when they are torn with remorse.”

The honorable functionary had scarcely expressed himself thus, in that intonation which is peculiar to brigadiers of the gendarmerie, when a loud scream, accompanied by the violent ringing of a bell, resounded through the court of the hotel. <Ah, what is that?> cried the brigadier.

<Some traveller seems impatient,> said the host. <What number was it that rang?>

<Number 3.>”

Andrea had very cleverly managed to descend two-thirds of the chimney, but then his foot slipped, and notwithstanding his endeavors, he came into the room with more speed and noise than he intended. It would have signified little had the room been empty, but unfortunately it was occupied. Two ladies, sleeping in one bed, were awakened by the noise, and fixing their eyes upon the spot whence the sound proceeded, they saw a man. One of these ladies, the fair one, uttered those terrible shrieks which resounded through the house, while the other, rushing to the bell-rope, rang with all her strength. Andrea, as we can see, was surrounded by misfortune.

<For pity’s sake,> he cried, pale and bewildered, without seeing whom he was addressing,—<for pity’s sake do not call assistance! Save me!—I will not harm you.>

<Andrea, the murderer!> cried one of the ladies.

<Eugénie! Mademoiselle Danglars!> exclaimed Andrea, stupefied.”

The baroness had looked forward to this marriage as a means of ridding her of a guardianship which, over a girl of Eugénie’s character, could not fail to be rather a troublesome undertaking; for in the tacit relations which maintain the bond of family union, the mother, to maintain her ascendancy over her daughter, must never fail to be a model of wisdom and a type of perfection.”

Sir, I do not deny the justice of your correction, but the more severely you arm yourself against that unfortunate man, the more deeply will you strike our family. Come, forget him for a moment, and instead of pursuing him, let him go.”

Listen; this is his description: <Benedetto, condemned, at the age of 16, for 5 years to the galleys for forgery.> He promised well, as you see—first a runaway, then an assassin.”

And who is this wretch?”

Who can tell?—a vagabond, a Corsican.”

Has no one owned him?”

No one; his parents are unknown.”

But who was the man who brought him from Lucca?”

for heaven’s sake, do not ask pardon of me for a guilty wretch! What am I?—the law. Has the law any eyes to witness your grief? Has the law ears to be melted by your sweet voice? Has the law a memory for all those soft recollections you endeavor to recall?” “Has mankind treated me as a brother? Have men loved me? Have they spared me? Has anyone shown the mercy towards me that you now ask at my hands? No, madame, they struck me, always struck me!”

Alas, alas, alas; all the world is wicked; let us therefore strike at wickedness!”

While working night and day, I sometimes lose all recollection of the past, and then I experience the same sort of happiness I can imagine the dead feel; still, it is better than suffering.”

Valentine, the hand which now threatens you will pursue you everywhere; your servants will be seduced with gold, and death will be offered to you disguised in every shape. You will find it in the water you drink from the spring, in the fruit you pluck from the tree.”

But did you not say that my kind grandfather’s precaution had neutralized the poison?”

Yes, but not against a strong dose; the poison will be changed, and the quantity increased.” He took the glass and raised it to his lips. “It is already done,” he said; “brucine is no longer employed, but a simple narcotic! I can recognize the flavor of the alcohol in which it has been dissolved. If you had taken what Madame de Villefort has poured into your glass, Valentine—Valentine—you would have been doomed!”

But,” exclaimed the young girl, “why am I thus pursued?”

Why?—are you so kind—so good—so unsuspicious of ill, that you cannot understand, Valentine?”

No, I have never injured her.”

But you are rich, Valentine; you have 200.000 livres a year, and you prevent her son from enjoying these 200.000 livres.”

Edward? Poor child! Are all these crimes committed on his account?”

Ah, then you at length understand?”

And is it possible that this frightful combination of crimes has been invented by a woman?”

Valentine, would you rather denounce your stepmother?”

I would rather die a hundred times—oh, yes, die!”

She tried to replace the arm, but it moved with a frightful rigidity which could not deceive a sick-nurse.”

For some temperaments work is a remedy for all afflictions.”

and the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré was filled with a crowd of idlers, equally pleased to witness the festivities or the mourning of the rich, and who rush with the same avidity to a funeral procession as to the marriage of a duchess.”

but the article is not mine; indeed, I doubt if it will please M. Villefort, for it says that if four successive deaths had happened anywhere else than in the house of the king’s attorney, he would have interested himself somewhat more about it.”

Do you know, count, that persons of our time of life—not that you belong to the class, you are still a young man,—but as I was saying, persons of our time of life have been very unfortunate this year. For example, look at the puritanical procureur, who has just lost his daughter, and in fact nearly all his family, in so singular a manner; Morcerf dishonored and dead; and then myself covered with ridicule through the villany of Benedetto; besides——”

Oh, how happy you must be in not having either wife or children!”

Do you think so?”

Indeed I do.”

Philosophers may well say, and practical men will always support the opinion, that money mitigates many trials; and if you admit the efficacy of this sovereign balm, you ought to be very easily consoled—you, the king of finance, the focus of immeasurable power.”

<So rich, dear sir, that your fortune resembles the pyramids; if you wished to demolish them you could not, and if it were possible, you would not dare!> Danglars smiled at the good-natured pleasantry of the count.”

It is a fine thing to have such credit; really, it is only in France these things are done. Five millions on five little scraps of paper!—it must be seen to be believed.”

If a thunderbolt had fallen at the banker’s feet, he could not have experienced greater terror.”

<I never joke with bankers,> said Monte Cristo in a freezing manner”

Ah, true, I was writing. I do sometimes, soldier though I am.”

Why do you mention my father?” stammered he; “why do you mingle a recollection of him with the affairs of today?”

Because I am he who saved your father’s life when he wished to destroy himself, as you do today—because I am the man who sent the purse to your young sister, and the Pharaon to old Morrel—because I am the Edmond Dantes who nursed you, a child, on my knees.” Morrel made another step back, staggering, breathless, crushed; then all his strength give way, and he fell prostrate at the feet of Monte Cristo. Then his admirable nature underwent a complete and sudden revulsion; he arose, rushed out of the room and to the stairs, exclaiming energetically, “Julie, Julie—Emmanuel, Emmanuel!”

<Live—the day will come when you will be happy, and will bless life!>—no matter whose voice had spoken, we should have heard him with the smile of doubt, or the anguish of incredulity,—and yet how many times has your father blessed life while embracing you—how often have I myself——”

Ah,” exclaimed Morrel, interrupting the count, “you had only lost your liberty, my father had only lost his fortune, but I have lost Valentine.”

in grief, as in life, there is always something to look forward to beyond (…) one day you will thank me for having preserved your life.”

Come—do you know of what the Count of Monte Cristo is capable? do you know that he holds terrestrial beings under his control?”

I do not know whether you remember that this is the 5th of September; it is 10 years today since I saved your father’s life, who wished to die.”

Asmodeus—that diabolical personage, who would have been created by every fertile imagination if Le Sage had not acquired the priority in his great masterpiece—would have enjoyed a singular spectacle, if he had lifted up the roof of the little house in the Rue Saint-Germain-des-Prés, while Debray was casting up his figures.”

Amongst the Catalans, Mercédès wished for a thousand things, but still she never really wanted any. So long as the nets were good, they caught fish; and so long as they sold their fish, they were able to buy twine for new nets.”

Now I think we are rich, since instead of the 114 francs we require for the journey we find ourselves in possession of 250.”

Silence,—be silent!” said Andrea, who knew the delicate sense of hearing possessed by the walls; “for heaven’s sake, do not speak so loud!”

But I have always observed that poisoners were cowards. Can you be a coward,—you who have had the courage to witness the death of two old men and a young girl murdered by you?”

What I require is, that justice be done. I am on the earth to punish, madame,” he added, with a flaming glance; “any other woman, were it the queen herself, I would send to the executioner; but to you I shall be merciful. To you I will say, <Have you not, madame, put aside some of the surest, deadliest, most speedy poison?>”

Oh, pardon me, sir; let me live!”

She is cowardly,” said Villefort.

and one of the softest and most brilliant days of September shone forth in all its splendor.”

Well, do you know why they die so multitudinously at M. de Villefort’s?”

<Multitudinously> is good,” said Château-Renaud.

My good fellow, you’ll find the word in Saint-Simon.”

But the thing itself is at M. de Villefort’s; but let’s get back to the subject.”

Talking of that,” said Debray, “Madame was making inquiries about that house, which for the last three months has been hung with black.”

Who is Madame?” asked Château-Renaud.

The minister’s wife, pardieu!

No, my dear fellow, it is not at all incredible. You saw the child pass through the Rue Richelieu last year, who amused himself with killing his brothers and sisters by sticking pins in their ears while they slept. The generation who follow us are very precocious.”

I am 21 years old, or rather I shall be in a few days, as I was born the night of the 27th of September, 1817.” M. de Villefort, who was busy taking down some notes, raised his head at the mention of this date.

<At Auteuil, near Paris.>” M. de Villefort a second time raised his head, looked at Benedetto as if he had been gazing at the head of Medusa, and became livid. As for Benedetto, he gracefully wiped his lips with a fine cambric pocket-handkerchief.”

This is, indeed, the reason why I begged you to alter the order of the questions.” The public astonishment had reached its height. There was no longer any deceit or bravado in the manner of the accused. The audience felt that a startling revelation was to follow this ominous prelude.

Well,” said the president; “your name?”

I cannot tell you my name, since I do not know it; but I know my father’s, and can tell it to you.”

A painful giddiness overwhelmed Villefort; great drops of acrid sweat fell from his face upon the papers which he held in his convulsed hand.

Repeat your father’s name,” said the president. Not a whisper, not a breath, was heard in that vast assembly; everyone waited anxiously.

My father is king’s attorney,’ replied Andrea calmly.

King’s attorney?” said the president, stupefied, and without noticing the agitation which spread over the face of M. de Villefort; ‘king’s attorney?”

Yes; and if you wish to know his name, I will tell it,—he is named Villefort.” The explosion, which had been so long restrained from a feeling of respect to the court of justice, now burst forth like thunder from the breasts of all present; the court itself did not seek to restrain the feelings of the audience. The exclamations, the insults addressed to Benedetto, who remained perfectly unconcerned, the energetic gestures, the movement of the gendarmes, the sneers of the scum of the crowd always sure to rise to the surface in case of any disturbance—all this lasted five minutes, before the door-keepers and magistrates were able to restore silence.

the procureur, who sat as motionless as though a thunderbolt had changed him into a corpse.”

I was born in No. 28, Rue de la Fontaine, in a room hung with red damask; my father took me in his arms, telling my mother I was dead, wrapped me in a napkin marked with an H and an N, and carried me into a garden, where he buried me alive.”

A shudder ran through the assembly when they saw that the confidence of the prisoner increased in proportion to the terror of M. de Villefort. “But how have you become acquainted with all these details?” asked the president.

The man carried me to the foundling asylum, where I was registered under the number 37. Three months afterwards, a woman travelled from Rogliano to Paris to fetch me, and having claimed me as her son, carried me away. Thus, you see, though born in Paris, I was brought up in Corsica.” “my perverse disposition prevailed over the virtues which my adopted mother endeavored to instil into my heart. I increased in wickedness till I committed crime.”

<Do not blaspheme, unhappy child, the crime is that of your father, not yours,—of your father, who consigned you to hell if you died, and to misery if a miracle preserved you alive.> After that I ceased to blaspheme, but I cursed my father. That is why I have uttered the words for which you blame me; that is why I have filled this whole assembly with horror. If I have committed an additional crime, punish me, but if you will allow that ever since the day of my birth my fate has been sad, bitter, and lamentable, then pity me.”

<My mother thought me dead; she is not guilty. I did not even wish to know her name, nor do I know it.>” Just then a piercing cry, ending in a sob, burst from the centre of the crowd, who encircled the lady who had before fainted, and who now fell into a violent fit of hysterics. She was carried out of the hall, the thick veil which concealed her face dropped off, and Madame Danglars was recognized.”

Well, then, look at M. de Villefort, and then ask me for proofs.”

Everyone turned towards the procureur, who, unable to bear the universal gaze now riveted on him alone, advanced staggering into the midst of the tribunal, with his hair dishevelled and his face indented with the mark of his nails. The whole assembly uttered a long murmur of astonishment.

Father,” said Benedetto, “I am asked for proofs, do you wish me to give them?”

No, no, it is useless,” stammered M. de Villefort in a hoarse voice; “no, it is useless!”

How useless?” cried the president, “what do you mean?”

I mean that I feel it impossible to struggle against this deadly weight which crushes me. Gentlemen, I know I am in the hands of an avenging God! We need no proofs; everything relating to this young man is true.”

A dull, gloomy silence, like that which precedes some awful phenomenon of nature, pervaded the assembly, who shuddered in dismay.

What, M. de Villefort,” cried the president, “do you yield to an hallucination? What, are you no longer in possession of your senses? This strange, unexpected, terrible accusation has disordered your reason. Come, recover.”

The procureur dropped his head; his teeth chattered like those of a man under a violent attack of fever, and yet he was deadly pale.

I am in possession of all my senses, sir,” he said; “my body alone suffers, as you may suppose. I acknowledge myself guilty of all the young man has brought against me, and from this hour hold myself under the authority of the procureur who will succeed me.”

And as he spoke these words with a hoarse, choking voice, he staggered towards the door, which was mechanically opened by a door-keeper.

Well,” said Beauchamp, “let them now say that drama is unnatural!”

Ma foi!” said Château-Renaud, “I would rather end my career like M. de Morcerf; a pistol-shot seems quite delightful compared with this catastrophe.”

And moreover, it kills,” said Beauchamp.

And to think that I had an idea of marrying his daughter,” said Debray. “She did well to die, poor girl!”

Many people have been assassinated in a tumult, but even criminals have rarely been insulted during trial.”

Those who hear the bitter cry are as much impressed as if they listened to an entire poem, and when the sufferer is sincere they are right in regarding his outburst as sublime.

It would be difficult to describe the state of stupor in which Villefort left the Palais. Every pulse beat with feverish excitement, every nerve was strained, every vein swollen, and every part of his body seemed to suffer distinctly from the rest, thus multiplying his agony a thousand-fold.”

The weight of his fallen fortunes seemed suddenly to crush him; he could not foresee the consequences; he could not contemplate the future with the indifference of the hardened criminal who merely faces a contingency already familiar.

God was still in his heart. <God,> he murmured, not knowing what he said,—<God—God!> Behind the event that had overwhelmed him he saw the hand of God.”

During the last hour his own crime had alone been presented to his mind; now another object, not less terrible, suddenly presented itself. His wife! He had just acted the inexorable judge with her, he had condemned her to death, and she, crushed by remorse, struck with terror, covered with the shame inspired by the eloquence of his irreproachable virtue,—she, a poor, weak woman, without help or the power of defending herself against his absolute and supreme will,—she might at that very moment, perhaps, be preparing to die!” “Ah,” he exclaimed, “that woman became criminal only from associating with me! I carried the infection of crime with me, and she has caught it as she would the typhus fever, the cholera, the plague! And yet I have punished her—I have dared to tell her—I have—<Repent and die!> But no, she must not die; she shall live, and with me. We will flee from Paris and go as far as the earth reaches. I told her of the scaffold; oh, heavens, I forgot that it awaits me also! How could I pronounce that word? Yes, we will fly (…) Oh, what an alliance—the tiger and the serpent; worthy wife of such as I am!” “She loves him; it was for his sake she has committed these crimes. We ought never to despair of softening the heart of a mother who loves her child.” “she will live and may yet be happy, since her child, in whom all her love is centred, will be with her. I shall have performed a good action, and my heart will be lighter.”

anxiety carried him on further.”

Héloïse!” he cried. He fancied he heard the sound of a piece of furniture being removed. “Héloïse!” he repeated.

It is done, monsieur,” she said with a rattling noise which seemed to tear her throat. “What more do you want?” and she fell full length on the floor.

Villefort ran to her and seized her hand, which convulsively clasped a crystal bottle with a golden stopper. Madame de Villefort was dead. Villefort, maddened with horror, stepped back to the threshhold of the door, fixing his eyes on the corpse: “My son!” he exclaimed suddenly, “where is my son?—Edward, Edward!” and he rushed out of the room, still crying, “Edward, Edward!”

his thoughts flew about madly in his brain like the wheels of a disordered watch.”

The unhappy man uttered an exclamation of joy; a ray of light seemed to penetrate the abyss of despair and darkness. He had only to step over the corpse, enter the boudoir, take the child in his arms, and flee far, far away.

Villefort was no longer the civilized man; he was a tiger hurt unto death, gnashing his teeth in his wound. He no longer feared realities, but phantoms. He leaped over the corpse as if it had been a burning brazier. He took the child in his arms, embraced him, shook him, called him, but the child made no response. He pressed his burning lips to the cheeks, but they were icy cold and pale; he felt the stiffened limbs; he pressed his hand upon the heart, but it no longer beat,—the child was dead.

A folded paper fell from Edward’s breast. Villefort, thunderstruck, fell upon his knees; the child dropped from his arms, and rolled on the floor by the side of its mother. He picked up the paper, and, recognizing his wife’s writing, ran his eyes rapidly over its contents; it ran as follows:—

You know that I was a good mother, since it was for my son’s sake I became criminal. A good mother cannot depart without her son.”

Villefort could not believe his eyes,—he could not believe his reason; he dragged himself towards the child’s body, and examined it as a lioness contemplates its dead cub. Then a piercing cry escaped from his breast, and he cried,

Still the hand of God.”

The presence of the two victims alarmed him; he could not bear solitude shared only by two corpses. Until then he had been sustained by rage, by his strength of mind, by despair, by the supreme agony which led the Titans to scale the heavens, and Ajax to defy the gods. He now arose, his head bowed beneath the weight of grief, and, shaking his damp, dishevelled hair, he who had never felt compassion for anyone determined to seek his father, that he might have someone to whom he could relate his misfortunes,—some one by whose side he might weep.

He descended the little staircase with which we are acquainted, and entered Noirtier’s room. The old man appeared to be listening attentively and as affectionately as his infirmities would allow to the Abbé Busoni, who looked cold and calm, as usual. Villefort, perceiving the abbé, passed his hand across his brow.

He recollected the call he had made upon him after the dinner at Auteuil, and then the visit the abbé had himself paid to his house on the day of Valentine’s death. “You here, sir!” he exclaimed; “do you, then, never appear but to act as an escort to death?”

Busoni turned around, and, perceiving the excitement depicted on the magistrate’s face, the savage lustre of his eyes, he understood that the revelation had been made at the assizes; but beyond this he was ignorant.

I came to pray over the body of your daughter.”

And now why are you here?”

I come to tell you that you have sufficiently repaid your debt, and that from this moment I will pray to God to forgive you, as I do.”

Good heavens!” exclaimed Villefort, stepping back fearfully, “surely that is not the voice of the Abbé Busoni!”

No!” The abbé threw off his wig, shook his head, and his hair, no longer confined, fell in black masses around his manly face.

It is the face of the Count of Monte Cristo!” exclaimed the procureur, with a haggard expression.

You are not exactly right, M. Procureur; you must go farther back.”

That voice, that voice!—where did I first hear it?”

You heard it for the first time at Marseilles, 23 years ago, the day of your marriage with Mademoiselle de Saint-Méran. Refer to your papers.”

You are not Busoni?—you are not Monte Cristo? Oh, heavens—you are, then, some secret, implacable, and mortal enemy! I must have wronged you in some way at Marseilles. Oh, woe to me!”

Yes; you are now on the right path,” said the count, crossing his arms over his broad chest; “search—search!”

But what have I done to you?” exclaimed Villefort, whose mind was balancing between reason and insanity, in that cloud which is neither a dream nor reality; “what have I done to you? Tell me, then! Speak!”

You condemned me to a horrible, tedious death; you killed my father; you deprived me of liberty, of love, and happiness.”

Who are you, then? Who are you?”

I am the spectre of a wretch you buried in the dungeons of the Château d’If. God gave that spectre the form of the Count of Monte Cristo when he at length issued from his tomb, enriched him with gold and diamonds, and led him to you!”

Ah, I recognize you—I recognize you!” exclaimed the king’s attorney; “you are——”

Monte Cristo became pale at this horrible sight; he felt that he had passed beyond the bounds of vengeance, and that he could no longer say, “God is for and with me.” With an expression of indescribable anguish he threw himself upon the body of the child, reopened its eyes, felt its pulse, and then rushed with him into Valentine’s room, of which he double-locked the door. “My child,” cried Villefort, “he carries away the body of my child! Oh, curses, woe, death to you!”

In his arms he held the child, whom no skill had been able to recall to life. Bending on one knee, he placed it reverently by the side of its mother, with its head upon her breast.” 

you may pretend he is not here, but I will find him, though I dig forever!” Monte Cristo drew back in horror.

Oh,” he said, “he is mad!” And as though he feared that the walls of the accursed house would crumble around him, he rushed into the street, for the first time doubting whether he had the right to do as he had done. “Oh, enough of this,—enough of this,” he cried; “let me save the last.”

Indeed,” said Julie, “might we not almost fancy, Emmanuel, that those people, so rich, so happy but yesterday, had forgotten in their prosperity that an evil genius—like the wicked fairies in Perrault’s stories who present themselves unbidden at a wedding or baptism—hovered over them, and appeared all at once to revenge himself for their fatal neglect?”

If the Supreme Being has directed the fatal blow,” said Emmanuel, “it must be that he in his great goodness has perceived nothing in the past lives of these people to merit mitigation of their awful punishment.”

Do you not form a very rash judgment, Emmanuel?” said Julie.

When he had fixed his piercing look on this modern Babylon, which equally engages the contemplation of the religious enthusiast, the materialist, and the scoffer,—

Great city,” murmured he, inclining his head, and joining his hands as if in prayer, “less than 6 months have elapsed since first I entered thy gates. I believe that the Spirit of God led my steps to thee and that he also enables me to quit thee in triumph; the secret cause of my presence within thy walls I have confided alone to him who only has had the power to read my heart. God only knows that I retire from thee without pride or hatred, but not without many regrets; he only knows that the power confided to me has never been made subservient to my personal good or to any useless cause. Oh, great city, it is in thy palpitating bosom that I have found that which I sought; like a patient miner, I have dug deep into thy very entrails to root out evil thence. Now my work is accomplished, my mission is terminated, now thou canst neither afford me pain nor pleasure. Adieu, Paris, adieu!”

Maximilian,” said the count, “the friends that we have lost do not repose in the bosom of the earth, but are buried deep in our hearts, and it has been thus ordained that we may always be accompanied by them. I have two friends, who in this way never depart from me; the one who gave me being, and the other who conferred knowledge and intelligence on me.” 

It is the way of weakened minds to see everything through a black cloud. The soul forms its own horizons; your soul is darkened, and consequently the sky of the future appears stormy and unpromising.”

Morrel was not insensible to that sensation of delight which is generally experienced in passing rapidly through the air, and the wind which occasionally raised the hair from his forehead seemed on the point of dispelling momentarily the clouds collected there.

As the distance increased between the travellers and Paris, almost superhuman serenity appeared to surround the count; he might have been taken for an exile about to revisit his native land.—Marseilles, white, fervid, full of life and energy,—Marseilles, the younger sister of Tyre and Carthage, the successor to them in the empire of the Mediterranean,—Marseilles, old, yet always young.

Oh, heavens!” exclaimed Morrel, “I do not deceive myself—that young man who is waving his hat, that youth in the uniform of a lieutenant, is Albert de Morcerf!”

Yes,” said Monte Cristo, “I recognized him.”

How so?—you were looking the other way.”

The Count smiled, as he was in the habit of doing when he did not want to make any reply, and he again turned towards the veiled woman, who soon disappeared at the corner of the street. Turning to his friend,—“Dear Maximilian,” said the count, “have you nothing to do in this land?”

See” (and she exposed her face completely to view)—“see, misfortune has silvered my hair, my eyes have shed so many tears that they are encircled by a rim of purple, and my brow is wrinkled. You, Edmond, on the contrary,—you are still young, handsome, dignified; it is because you have had faith; because you have had strength, because you have had trust in God, and God has sustained you.” “It often happens,” continued she, “that a first fault destroys the prospects of a whole life.” 

Why, having recognized you, and I the only one to do so—why was I able to save my son alone? Ought I not also to have rescued the man that I had accepted for a husband, guilty though he were? Yet I let him die! What do I say? Oh, merciful heavens, was I not accessory to his death by my supine insensibility, by my contempt for him, not remembering, or not willing to remember, that it was for my sake he had become a traitor and a perjurer? (…) like all renegades I am of evil omen to those who surround me!”

God needed me, and I lived. Examine the past and the present, and endeavor to dive into futurity, and then say whether I am not a divine instrument. The most dreadful misfortunes, the most frightful sufferings, the abandonment of all those who loved me, the persecution of those who did not know me, formed the trials of my youth; when suddenly, from captivity, solitude, misery, I was restored to light and liberty, and became the possessor of a fortune so brilliant, so unbounded, so unheard-of, that I must have been blind not to be conscious that God had endowed me with it to work out his own great designs.  (…) Not a thought was given to a life which you once, Mercédès, had the power to render blissful; not one hour of peaceful calm was mine; but I felt myself driven on like an exterminating angel.

I collected every means of attack and defence; I inured my body to the most violent exercises, my soul to the bitterest trials; I taught my arm to slay, my eyes to behold excruciating sufferings, and my mouth to smile at the most horrid spectacles. Good-natured, confiding, and forgiving as I had been, I became revengeful, cunning, and wicked, or rather, immovable as fate.”

Like the gulf between me and the past, there is an abyss between you, Edmond, and the rest of mankind; and I tell you freely that the comparison I draw between you and other men will ever be one of my greatest tortures. No, there is nothing in the world to resemble you in worth and goodness!”

Before I leave you, Mercédès, have you no request to make?” said the count.

I desire but one thing in this world, Edmond,—the happiness of my son.”

I approve of the deed, but I must pray for the dead.”

I have no will, unless it be the will never to decide.”

A man of the count’s temperament could not long indulge in that melancholy which can exist in common minds, but which destroys superior ones. He thought he must have made an error in his calculations if he now found cause to blame himself.”

can I have been following a false path?—can the end which I proposed be a mistaken end?—can one hour have sufficed to prove to an architect that the work upon which he founded all his hopes was an impossible, if not a sacrilegious, undertaking? I cannot reconcile myself to this idea—it would madden me. The reason why I am now dissatisfied is that I have not a clear appreciation of the past. The past, like the country through which we walk, becomes indistinct as we advance. My position is like that of a person wounded in a dream”

There had been no prisoners confined in the Château d’If since the revolution of July; it was only inhabited by a guard, kept there for the prevention of smuggling [tráfico]. A concierge waited at the door to exhibit to visitors this monument of curiosity, once a scene of terror. The count inquired whether any of the ancient jailers were still there; but they had all been pensioned, or had passed on to some other employment. The concierge who attended him had only been there since 1830. He visited his own dungeon. He again beheld the dull light vainly endeavoring to penetrate the narrow opening. His eyes rested upon the spot where had stood his bed, since then removed, and behind the bed the new stones indicated where the breach made by the Abbé Faria had been. Monte Cristo felt his limbs tremble; he seated himself upon a log of wood.

<Are there any stories connected with this prison besides the one relating to the poisoning of Mirabeau?> asked the count; <are there any traditions respecting these dismal abodes,—in which it is difficult to believe men can ever have imprisoned their fellow-creatures?>

<Yes, sir; indeed, the jailer Antoine told me one connected with this very dungeon.>

Monte Cristo shuddered; Antoine had been his jailer. He had almost forgotten his name and face, but at the mention of the name he recalled his person as he used to see it, the face encircled by a beard, wearing the brown jacket, the bunch of keys, the jingling of which he still seemed to hear.”

he felt afraid of hearing his own history.”

And which of them made this passage?”

Oh, it must have been the young man, certainly, for he was strong and industrious, while the abbé was aged and weak; besides, his mind was too vacillating to allow him to carry out an idea.”

Blind fools!” murmured the count.

However, be that as it may, the young man made a tunnel, how or by what means no one knows; but he made it, and there is the evidence yet remaining of his work. Do you see it?”

The result was that the two men communicated with one another; how long they did so, nobody knows. One day the old man fell ill and died. Now guess what the young one did?”

Tell me.”

Now this was his project. He fancied that they buried the dead at the Château d’If, and imagining they would not expend much labor on the grave of a prisoner, he calculated on raising the earth with his shoulders, but unfortunately their arrangements at the Château frustrated his projects. They never buried the dead; they merely attached a heavy cannon-ball to the feet, and then threw them into the sea. This is what was done. The young man was thrown from the top of the rock; the corpse was found on the bed next day, and the whole truth was guessed, for the men who performed the office then mentioned what they had not dared to speak of before, that at the moment the corpse was thrown into the deep, they heard a shriek, which was almost immediately stifled by the water in which it disappeared.” The count breathed with difficulty; the cold drops ran down his forehead, and his heart was full of anguish.

No,” he muttered, “the doubt I felt was but the commencement of forgetfulness; but here the wound reopens, and the heart again thirsts for vengeance. And the prisoner,” he continued aloud, “was he ever heard of afterwards?”

Oh, no; of course not.

Then you pity him?” said the count.

Ma foi, yes; though he was in his own element.”

What do you mean?”

The report was that he had been a naval officer, who had been confined for plotting with the Bonapartists.”

Great is truth,” muttered the count, “fire cannot burn, nor water drown it! Thus the poor sailor lives in the recollection of those who narrate his history; his terrible story is recited in the chimney-corner, and a shudder is felt at the description of his transit through the air to be swallowed by the deep.” Then, the count added aloud, “Was his name ever known?”

Oh, yes; but only as No. 34.” #SugestãodeTítulodeLivro

Oh, Villefort, Villefort,” murmured the count, “this scene must often have haunted thy sleepless hours!”

Ah—No. 27.”

Yes; No. 27.” repeated the count, who seemed to hear the voice of the abbé answering him in those very words through the wall when asked his name.

Come, sir.”

I will leave you the torch, sir.”

No, take it away; I can see in the dark.”

Why, you are like No. 34. They said he was so accustomed to darkness that he could see a pin in the darkest corner of his dungeon.”

He spent 14 years to arrive at that,” muttered the count.

The guide carried away the torch.

O God! he read, preserve my memory!

Oh, yes,” he cried, “that was my only prayer at last; I no longer begged for liberty, but memory; I dreaded to become mad and forgetful. O God, thou hast preserved my memory; I thank thee, I thank thee!” 

Listen,” said the guide; “I said to myself, <Something is always left in a cell inhabited by one prisoner for 15 years,> so I began to sound the wall.”

Ah,” cried Monte Cristo, remembering the abbé’s 2 hiding-places.

After some search, I found that the floor gave a hollow sound near the head of the bed, and at the hearth.”

Yes,” said the count, “yes.”

I raised the stones, and found——”

A rope-ladder and some tools?”

How do you know that?” asked the guide in astonishment.

I do not know—I only guess it, because that sort of thing is generally found in prisoners’ cells.”

Yes, sir, a rope-ladder and tools.”

And have you them yet?”

No, sir; I sold them to visitors, who considered them great curiosities; but I have still something left.”

What is it?” asked the count, impatiently.

A sort of book, written upon strips of cloth.”

Go and fetch it, my good fellow; and if it be what I hope, you will do well.”

I will run for it, sir;” and the guide went out. Then the count knelt down by the side of the bed, which death had converted into an altar. “Oh, second father,” he exclaimed, “thou who hast given me liberty, knowledge, riches; thou who, like beings of a superior order to ourselves, couldst understand the science of good and evil”

Remove from me the remains of doubt, which, if it change not to conviction, must become remorse!” The count bowed his head, and clasped his hands together.

The manuscript was the great work by the Abbé Faria upon the kingdoms of Italy. The count seized it hastily, his eyes immediately fell upon the epigraph, and he read, <Thou shalt tear out the dragons’ teeth, and shall trample the lions under foot, saith the Lord.>

Ah,” he exclaimed, “here is my answer. Thanks, father, thanks.”

The name he pronounced, in a voice of tenderness, amounting almost to love, was that of Haydée.”

Alas,” said Monte Cristo, “it is the infirmity of our nature always to believe ourselves much more unhappy than those who groan by our sides!”

I knew a man who like you had fixed all his hopes of happiness upon a woman. He was young, he had an old father whom he loved, a betrothed bride whom he adored. He was about to marry her, when one of the caprices of fate,—which would almost make us doubt the goodness of Providence, if that Providence did not afterwards reveal itself by proving that all is but a means of conducting to an end,—one of those caprices deprived him of his mistress, of the future of which he had dreamed (for in his blindness he forgot he could only read the present), and cast him into a dungeon.”

Fourteen years!” he muttered—“Fourteen years!” repeated the count. “During that time he had many moments of despair. He also, Morrel, like you, considered himself the unhappiest of men.”

She was dead?”

Worse than that, she was faithless, and had married one of the persecutors of her betrothed. You see, then, Morrel, that he was a more unhappy lover than you.”

And has he found consolation?”

He has at least found peace.”

And does he ever expect to be happy?”

He hopes so, Maximilian.” The young man’s head fell on his breast.

Another proof that he was a native of the universal country was apparent in the fact of his knowing no other Italian words than the terms used in music, and which like the <goddam> of Figaro, served all possible linguistic requirements. <Allegro!> he called out to the postilions at every ascent. <Moderato!> he cried as they descended. And heaven knows there are hills enough between Rome and Florence by the way of Aquapendente! These two words greatly amused the men to whom they were addressed.

What subject of meditation could present itself to the banker, so fortunately become bankrupt?

Danglars thought for ten minutes about his wife in Paris; another ten minutes about his daughter travelling with Mademoiselle d’Armilly; the same period was given to his creditors, and the manner in which he intended spending their money; and then, having no subject left for contemplation, he shut his eyes, and fell asleep.”

where are we going?”

Dentro la testa! answered a solemn and imperious voice, accompanied by a menacing gesture. Danglars thought dentro la testa meant, “Put in your head!” He was making rapid progress in Italian. He obeyed, not without some uneasiness, which, momentarily increasing, caused his mind, instead of being as unoccupied as it was when he began his journey, to fill with ideas which were very likely to keep a traveller awake, more especially one in such a situation as Danglars. His eyes acquired that quality which in the first moment of strong emotion enables them to see distinctly, and which afterwards fails from being too much taxed. Before we are alarmed, we see correctly; when we are alarmed, we see double; and when we have been alarmed, we see nothing but trouble.

His hair stood on end. He remembered those interesting stories, so little believed in Paris, respecting Roman bandits; he remembered the adventures that Albert de Morcerf had related when it was intended that he should marry Mademoiselle Eugénie.”

Is this the man?” asked the captain, who was attentively reading Plutarch’s Life of Alexander.

Himself, captain—himself.”

The man is tired,” said the captain, “conduct him to his bed.”

Oh,” murmured Danglars, “that bed is probably one of the coffins hollowed in the wall, and the sleep I shall enjoy will be death from one of the poniards I see glistening in the darkness.”

From their beds of dried leaves or wolf-skins at the back of the chamber now arose the companions of the man who had been found by Albert de Morcerf reading Cæsar’s Commentaries, and by Danglars studying the Life of Alexander. The banker uttered a groan and followed his guide; he neither supplicated nor exclaimed. He no longer possessed strength, will, power, or feeling; he followed where they led him. At length he found himself at the foot of a staircase, and he mechanically lifted his foot five or six times. Then a low door was opened before him, and bending his head to avoid striking his forehead he entered a small room cut out of the rock. The cell was clean, though empty, and dry, though situated at an immeasurable distance under the earth.

Oh, God be praised,” he said; “it is a real bed!”

Ecco! said the guide, and pushing Danglars into the cell, he closed the door upon him. A bolt grated and Danglars was a prisoner. If there had been no bolt, it would have been impossible for him to pass through the midst of the garrison who held the catacombs of St. Sebastian, encamped round a master whom our readers must have recognized as the famous Luigi Vampa.

Since the bandits had not despatched him at once, he felt that they would not kill him at all. They had arrested him for the purpose of robbery, and as he had only a few louis about him, he doubted not he would be ransomed. He remembered that Morcerf had been taxed at 4.000 crowns, and as he considered himself of much greater importance than Morcerf he fixed his own price at 8.000 crowns. Eight thousand crowns amounted to 48.000 livres; he would then have about 5.050.000 francs left. With this sum he could manage to keep out of difficulties.”

His first idea was to breathe, that he might know whether he was wounded. He borrowed this from Don Quixote, the only book he had ever read, but which he still slightly remembered.”

Two millions?—three?—four? Come, four? I will give them to you on condition that you let me go.”

Why do you offer me 4.000.000 for what is worth 5.000.000? This is a kind of usury, banker, that I do not understand.”

Take all, then—take all, I tell you, and kill me!”

Come, come, calm yourself. You will excite your blood, and that would produce an appetite it would require a million a day to satisfy. Be more economical.”

(…)

But you say you do not wish to kill me?”

No.”

And yet you will let me perish with hunger?”

Ah, that is a different thing.”

For the first time in his life, Danglars contemplated death with a mixture of dread and desire; the time had come when the implacable spectre, which exists in the mind of every human creature, arrested his attention and called out with every pulsation of his heart, <Thou shalt die!>”

he who had just abandoned 5.000.000 endeavored to save the 50.000 francs he had left, and sooner than give them up he resolved to enter again upon a life of privation—he was deluded by the hopefulness that is a premonition of madness. He who for so long a time had forgotten God, began to think that miracles were possible—that the accursed cavern might be discovered by the officers of the Papal States, who would release him; that then he would have 50.000 remaining, which would be sufficient to save him from starvation; and finally he prayed that this sum might be preserved to him, and as he prayed he wept.”

Are you not a Christian?” he said, falling on his knees. “Do you wish to assassinate a man who, in the eyes of heaven, is a brother? Oh, my former friends, my former friends!” he murmured, and fell with his face to the ground. Then rising in despair, he exclaimed, “The chief, the chief!”

Still, there have been men who suffered more than you.”

I do not think so.”

Yes; those who have died of hunger.”

Danglars thought of the old man whom, in his hours of delirium, he had seen groaning on his bed. He struck his forehead on the ground and groaned. “Yes,” he said, “there have been some who have suffered more than I have, but then they must have been martyrs at least.”

Yes; you see I am as exact as you are. But you are dripping, my dear fellow; you must change your clothes, as Calypso said to Telemachus. Come, I have a habitation prepared for you in which you will soon forget fatigue and cold.”

I have made an agreement with the navy, that the access to my island shall be free of all charge. I have made a bargain.”

Morrel looked at the count with surprise. “Count,” he said, “you are not the same here as in Paris.”

You are wrong, Morrel; I was really happy.”

Then you forget me, so much the better.”

How so?”

Yes; for as the gladiator said to the emperor, when he entered the arena, <He who is about to die salutes you.>

Why should we not spend the last three hours remaining to us of life, like those ancient Romans, who when condemned by Nero, their emperor and heir, sat down at a table covered with flowers, and gently glided into death, amid the perfume of heliotropes and roses?”

Count,” said Morrel, “you are the epitome of all human knowledge, and you seem like a being descended from a wiser and more advanced world than ours.”

There is something true in what you say,” said the count, with that smile which made him so handsome; “I have descended from a planet called grief.”

I believe all you tell me without questioning its meaning; for instance, you told me to live, and I did live; you told me to hope, and I almost did so. I am almost inclined to ask you, as though you had experienced death, <is it painful to die?>

Monte Cristo looked upon Morrel with indescribable tenderness. “Yes,” he said, “yes, doubtless it is painful, if you violently break the outer covering which obstinately begs for life. If you plunge a dagger into your flesh, if you insinuate a bullet into your brain, which the least shock disorders,—then certainly, you will suffer pain, and you will repent quitting a life for a repose you have bought at so dear a price.”

Yes; I know that there is a secret of luxury and pain in death, as well as in life; the only thing is to understand it.”

You have spoken truly, Maximilian; according to the care we bestow upon it, death is either a friend who rocks us gently as a nurse, or an enemy who violently drags the soul from the body. Some day, when the world is much older, and when mankind will be masters of all the destructive powers in nature, to serve for the general good of humanity; when mankind, as you were just saying, have discovered the secrets of death, then that death will become as sweet and voluptuous as a slumber in the arms of your beloved.”

I am endeavoring,” he thought, “to make this man happy; I look upon this restitution as a weight thrown into the scale to balance the evil I have wrought. Now, supposing I am deceived, supposing this man has not been unhappy enough to merit happiness. Alas, what would become of me who can only atone for evil by doing good?

Then he saw a woman of marvellous beauty appear on the threshold of the door separating the two rooms. Pale, and sweetly smiling, she looked like an angel of mercy conjuring the angel of vengeance.

Is it heaven that opens before me?” thought the dying man; “that angel resembles the one I have lost.”

Monte Cristo pointed out Morrel to the young woman, who advanced towards him with clasped hands and a smile upon her lips.

Valentine, Valentine!” he mentally ejaculated; but his lips uttered no sound, and as though all his strength were centred in that internal emotion, he sighed and closed his eyes. Valentine rushed towards him; his lips again moved.

Without me, you would both have died. May God accept my atonement in the preservation of these two existences!” “Oh, thank me again!” said the count; “tell me till you are weary, that I have restored you to happiness; you do not know how much I require this assurance.”

Because tomorrow, Haydée, you will be free; you will then assume your proper position in society, for I will not allow my destiny to overshadow yours. Daughter of a prince, I restore to you the riches and name of your father.”

do you not see how pale she is? Do you not see how she suffers?”

Oh, yes,” she cried, “I do love you! I love you as one loves a father, brother, husband! I love you as my life, for you are the best, the noblest of created beings!”

Let it be, then, as you wish, sweet angel; God has sustained me in my struggle with my enemies, and has given me this reward; he will not let me end my triumph in suffering; I wished to punish myself, but he has pardoned me. Love me then, Haydée! Who knows? perhaps your love will make me forget all that I do not wish to remember.”

What do you mean, my lord?”

I mean that one word from you has enlightened me more than 20 years of slow experience; I have but you in the world, Haydée; through you I again take hold on life, through you I shall suffer, through you rejoice.”

Novas famílias curam das antigas!

“There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness. We must have felt what it is to die, Morrel, that we may appreciate the enjoyments of living.” Indeed Zupamann!

Live, then, and be happy, beloved children of my heart, and never forget that until the day when God shall deign to reveal the future to man, all human wisdom is summed up in these two words,—<Wait and hope.> (Fac et spera)!—Your friend,

<Edmond Dantes, Count of Monte Cristo.>

A CONDIÇÃO HUMANA

Hannah Arendt – revisão e apresentação de Adriano Correia, tradução de Roberto Raposo

DIC:

moulin: engenho

predicament/Verlegenheit: constrangimento

O alemão Arbeit se aplicava originalmente apenas ao trabalho agrícola executado por servos, e não à obra do artesão, que era chamada Werk. O francês travailler substituiu o mais antigo labourer e deriva de tripalium, uma espécie de tortura. (cf. Grimm e Lucien Fèbre)” “o verbo werken é pouco utilizado, enquanto o substantivo Werk ainda é usual no vocabulário alemão corrente”

Para a presente tradução foram consultadas com freqüência as traduções alemã (Vita activa – oder Vom tätigen Leben, Piper, 2007), francesa (Condition de l’homme moderne, trad. Georges Fradier, Calmann-Lévy, 2007) e espanhola (La condición humana, trad. Ramón Gil Novales, Paidós, 2005).”

Nas últimas páginas da primeira edição de As origens do totalitarismo, Arendt faz uma referência peculiar ao conceito kantiano de <mal radical>, que teria surgido <em conexão com um sistema no qual todos os homens se tornaram igualmente supérfluos>.” “o mal absoluto contido na possibilidade de erradicação da pluralidade da face da Terra”

Na última frase do livro, ela observa que <as soluções totalitárias podem bem sobreviver à queda dos regimes totalitários na forma de fortes tentações que surgirão sempre que parecer impossível aliviar a miséria política, social ou econômica de um modo digno do homem>.”

julga que o totalitarismo é uma nova forma de dominação que representa a destruição do político

o desamparo organizado é consideravelmente mais perigoso que a impotência desorganizada de todos aqueles que são governados pela vontade tirânica e arbitrária de um único homem.”

o início, antes de se tornar um evento histórico, é a suprema capacidade do homem (…) Initium ut esset homo creatus est – <para que houvesse um início o homem foi criado>, disse Agostinho (A cidade de Deus, Livro 12, cap. 20).” “Se Kant tivesse conhecido a filosofia da natalidade de Agostinho, provavelmente teria concordado que a liberdade da espontaneidade relativamente absoluta não é mais embaraçosa para a razão humana do que o fato de os homens nascerem – continuamente recém-chegados a um mundo que os precede no tempo.” “Os homens, como entes do mundo, são politicamente não seres para a morte, mas permanentes afirmadores da singularidade que o nascimento inaugura.”

no plano teórico, ao conceber o trabalho como criador de todos os valores e glorificar a atividade tradicionalmente mais desprezada, Karl Marx teria apenas radicalizado as posições de Adam Smith, para quem o trabalho era o criador de toda riqueza, e de John Locke, para quem o trabalho era a fonte do direito de propriedade.”

O trabalho, entretanto, é uma <atividade na qual o homem não está junto ao mundo nem convive com os outros, mas está sozinho com seu corpo ante a pura necessidade de manter-se vivo>, e justamente por isso é radicalmente antipolítica.”

Para Arendt, <a mais séria lacuna em As origens do totalitarismo é a ausência de uma análise conceitual e histórica adequada do pano de fundo ideológico do bolchevismo. Essa omissão foi deliberada. (…) O racismo e o imperialismo, o nacionalismo tribal dos pan-movimentos e o antissemitismo não mantinham relação com as grandes tradições filosóficas e políticas do Ocidente. A aterradora originalidade do totalitarismo (…) é facilmente negligenciada se se enfatiza demasiadamente o único elemento que tem atrás de si uma tradição respeitável e cuja discussão crítica requer a crítica de alguns dos mais importantes preceitos da filosofia política ocidental: o Marxismo>, apud Jerome Kohn” “Arendt afirma em Entre o passado e o futuro, que <a tradição de nosso pensamento político teve seu início definido nos ensinamentos de Platão e Aristóteles. Creio que ela chegou a um fim não menos definido nas teorias de Karl Marx>, que manifestavam a intenção de abjurar a filosofia e buscar realizá-la na política.” “a ruptura de Marx com a tradição da filosofia, partindo da theoria ou contemplação em direção à práxis, não foi tão profunda, uma vez que não se traduziu em uma recusa da compreensão da práxis como poiesis; da ação como fabricação, nem redundou no reconhecimento da dignidade própria ao domínio político.”

Elizabeth Young-Bruehl, na sua ainda definitiva biografia sobre Arendt” “Conferir ainda a carta a Martin Heidegger, de 8 de maio de 1954 (Hannah Arendt/Martin Heidegger – correspondência: 1925-1975, Relume-Dumará, 2001).” Curiosidade supérflua: a correspondência entre H.A. e M.H. abrange, como se pode ver, 50 anos. A correspondência entre H.A. e Karl Jaspers abrange 43 anos.

Arendt distingue o mundo moderno, que teria começado politicamente com as explosões atômicas, da era moderna, que começou cientificamente no século XVII e terminou no limiar do século XX.”

Enredada no ciclo de esgotamento e regeneração que preside os processos corporais, a atividade do trabalho experimenta o tempo como um contínuo devir de processos circulares. (…) Esses produtos não demoram no mundo tempo suficiente para formarem parte dele nem desfrutam da durabilidade necessária para transcender o tempo de vida de seus produtores – o trabalho jamais transcende a vida.”

a redenção da vida, sustentada pelo trabalho, é a mundanidade, sustentada pela fabricação.”

A despeito de conceber seus produtos no isolamento, ou na companhia de poucos ajudantes ou aprendizes, o homo faber, na medida em que também visa a exibir e trocar seus produtos, acaba por instaurar como lugar de reunião um mercado de trocas, externo ao espaço de produção e à atividade da fabricação (…), mas ainda assim uma extensão sua. (…) <ao contrário do animal laborans, cuja vida social é sem mundo e gregária, e que, portanto, é incapaz de construir ou habitar domínio público, mundano, o homo faber é perfeitamente capaz de ter um domínio público próprio, embora não possa ser um domínio político propriamente dito>. O homo faber, como fabricante de coisas e produtor do mundo, relaciona-se com os outros como homo faber apenas no mercado de trocas no qual exibe seus produtos. [Facebook, Twitter, WordPress e Recanto das Letras!] (…) Arendt assinala que já entre os antigos gregos e romanos os artífices constituíam uma comunidade a ocupar o limiar em que os produtos privados têm de ser exibidos em público e o espaço público é ocupado de um modo a-político” “O utilitarismo sistemático, que Hannah Arendt julga ser, por excelência, a filosofia do homo faber, engendra como seu inelutável efeito colateral a completa ausência de significado.”

<vemos agora surgir, de várias maneiras, a cultura de uma sociedade em que o comércio é a alma, assim como a peleja individual para os antigos gregos, e a guerra, a vitória e o direito para os romanos.> Nietzsche, Aurora (aforismo 175)

No final de Sobre a revolução, ela menciona o trecho de Édipo em Colono, no qual se traduz a sabedoria de Sileno, o sátiro companheiro de Dioniso: <não ter nascido se sobrepõe a todo significado revelado em palavras; de longe, a segunda melhor coisa para a vida, uma vez que ela tenha aparecido, é retornar o mais rapidamente possível para o lugar de onde veio.>”

A vida só começa aos -273º

se a soberania e a liberdade fossem realmente a mesma coisa, nenhum homem poderia ser livre, pois a soberania, o ideal da inflexível autossuficiência e autodomínio, contradiz a própria condição da pluralidade.”

Essa ocorrência simultânea de liberdade com não soberania parece indicar que a existência humana é mesmo absurda e que Platão teria razão ao recomendar que não levássemos muito a sério o domínio dos assuntos humanos, pois aí operamos como marionetes de algum deus.”

quanto temos de transformar as vidas privadas dos pobres?”

homem – diz ela – é a-político. A política surge no entre-os-homens: portanto, totalmente fora dos homens. Por conseguinte, não existe nenhuma substância política original.”

Agamben – L’aperto: l’uomo e l’animale

Homo sacer – o poder soberano e a vida nua

o animal laborans jamais poderia dizer, como Maquiavel o fez mais de uma vez: <amo mais Florença que minha vida ou a salvação da minha alma>”

* * *

Esse homem futuro, que os cientistas nos dizem que produzirão em menos de um século, parece imbuído por uma rebelião contra a existência humana tal como ela tem sido dada – um dom gratuito vindo de lugar nenhum (secularmente falando) que ele deseja trocar, por assim dizer, por algo produzido por ele mesmo. Não há razão para duvidar de que sejamos capazes de realizar tal troca, assim como não há motivo para duvidar de nossa atual capacidade de destruir toda vida orgânica na Terra. A questão é apenas se desejamos usar nessa direção nosso novo conhecimento científico e técnico, e essa questão não pode ser decidida por meios científicos; é uma questão política de primeira grandeza, cuja decisão, portanto, não pode ser deixada a cientistas profissionais ou a políticos profissionais.” (1957)

Se for comprovado o divórcio entre o conhecimento (no sentido moderno de conhecimento técnico [know-how]) e o pensamento, então passaríamos a ser, sem dúvida, escravos indefesos, não tanto de nossas máquinas quanto de nosso conhecimento técnico, criaturas desprovidas de pensamento à mercê de qualquer engenhoca tecnicamente possível, por mais mortífera que seja.”

atualmente as ciências são forçadas a adotar uma <linguagem> de símbolos matemáticos que, embora originariamente concebida apenas como uma abreviação de afirmações enunciadas, contém agora afirmações que de modo algum podem ser retraduzidas em discurso.”

É uma sociedade de trabalhadores a que está para ser liberada dos grilhões do trabalho, uma sociedade que já não conhece aquelas outras atividades superiores e mais significativas em vista das quais essa liberdade mereceria ser conquistada.” “Até presidentes, reis e primeiros-ministros concebem seus cargos como um emprego necessário à vida da sociedade, e, entre os intelectuais, restam somente indivíduos solitários que consideram o que fazem como uma obra, e não como meio de ganhar o próprio sustento.”

Não houve um Adão nem uma Eva no reino animal.

A pluralidade é a condição da ação humana porque somos todos iguais, isto é, humanos, de um modo tal que ninguém jamais é igual a qualquer outro que viveu, vive ou viverá.”

PONTADA NO “MARIDO TRANSATLÂNTICO”: “Além disso, como a ação é a atividade política por excelência, a natalidade, e não a mortalidade, pode ser a categoria central do pensamento político, em contraposição ao pensamento metafísico.”

Tudo o que adentra o mundo humano por si próprio, ou para ele é trazido pelo esforço humano, torna-se parte da condição humana. (…) por ser uma existência condicionada, a existência humana seria impossível sem coisas, e estas seriam um amontoado de artigos desconectados, um não-mundo, se não fossem os condicionantes da existência humana.” “A mudança mais radical da condição humana que podemos imaginar seria uma emigração dos homens da Terra para algum outro planeta. (…) O trabalho, a obra, a ação e, na verdade, mesmo o pensamento, como o conhecemos, deixariam de ter sentido. No entanto, até esses hipotéticos viajores da Terra ainda seriam humanos; mas a única afirmativa que poderíamos fazer quanto à sua <natureza> é que são ainda seres condicionados, embora sua condição seja agora, em grande parte, produzida por eles mesmos.”

a quaestio mihi factus sum (<a questão que me tornei para mim mesmo> de Agostinho” “Ag., geralmente considerado o primeiro a levantar a chamada questão antropológica na filosofia” “tu, quis es? [Confissões, x. 6]” “<O que sou então, meu Deus? Qual é a minha natureza?> – Quid ergo sum, Deus meus? Quae natura sum? [x. 17]. Pois no <grande mistério>, no grande profundum [iv. 14], há <algo do homem [aliquid hominis] que o espírito do homem que nele está não sabe. Mas tu, Senhor, que o fizeste [fecisti eum], tudo sabes a seu respeito [eius omnia]> [x. 5]” “A questão da natureza do homem é uma questão teológica tanto quanto a questão da natureza de Deus; ambas só podem ser resolvidas dentro da estrutura de uma resposta divinamente revelada.” “as tentativas de definir natureza humana resultam quase invariavelmente na construção de alguma deidade, isto é, no deus dos filósofos que, desde Platão, revela-se, em um exame mais acurado, como uma espécie de idéia platônica do homem. Naturalmente, desmascarar tais conceitos filosóficos do divino como conceitualizações das capacidades e qualidades humanas não é uma demonstração da não-existência de Deus, e nem mesmo constitui argumento nesse sentido”

RESUMO DA TESE DO LIVRO: “as condições da existência humana – a vida, a natalidade e a mortalidade, a mundanidade, a pluralidade e a Terra – jamais podem <explicar> o que somos ou responder à pergunta sobre quem somos, pela simples razão de que jamais nos condicionam de modo absoluto. Essa sempre foi a opinião da filosofia em contraposição às ciências (antropologia, psicologia, biologia, etc.) que também se ocupam do homem. Mas hoje podemos quase dizer que já demonstramos, mesmo cientificamente, que, embora vivamos sob condições terrenas, e provavelmente viveremos sempre, não somos meras criaturas terrenas. A moderna ciência natural deve os seus maiores triunfos ao fato de ter considerado e tratado a natureza terrena de um ponto de vista verdadeiramente universal, isto é, de um ponto de vista arquimediano escolhido, voluntária e explicitamente, fora da Terra.”

o artesão, ao fazer um contrato de trabalho, abria mão de 2 dos 4 elementos de seu status de homem livre (a saber, liberdade de atividade econômica e direito de movimentação irrestrista), mas por vontade própria e temporariamente” Westermann

o modo de vida do déspota, pelo fato de ser <meramente> uma necessidade, não podia ser considerado livre e nada tinha a ver com o bios politikos.”

Com o desaparecimento da antiga cidade-Estado, o bios theoretikos, traduzido como vita contemplativa, era agora o único modo de vida realmente livre.

Contudo, a enorme superioridade da contemplação sobre qualquer outro tipo de atividade, inclusive a ação, não é de origem cristã.” “a posterior pretensão dos cristãos de serem livres de envolvimento em assuntos mundanos, de todos os negócios deste mundo, foi precedida pela apolitia filosófica da Antiguidade tardia, e dela se originou.”

A palavra grega skhole, como a latina ocium, significa basicamente isenção de atividade política e não simplesmente lazer, embora ambas sejam também usadas para indicar isenção do trabalho e das necessidades da vida. De qualquer modo, indicam sempre uma condição de liberação de preocupações e cuidados.”

Fustel de Coulanges – A cidade antiga

Todo movimento, os movimentos do corpo e da alma, bem como do discurso e do raciocínio devem cessar diante da verdade. Esta, seja a antiga verdade do Ser ou a verdade cristã do Deus vivo, só pode revelar-se em meio à completa tranqüilidade humana. Tomás de Aquino ressalta a tranqüilidade da alma, e recomenda a vida activa porque ela extenua e, portanto, <aquieta as paixões interiores> e prepara para a contemplação (Suma teológica, ii. 2. 182. 3).”

Até o início da era moderna, a expressão vita activa jamais perdeu sua conotação negativa de <in-quietude>, nec-octium, a-skholia.”

nenhuma obra de mãos humanas pode igualar em beleza e verdade o kosmos físico, que revolve em torno de si mesmo, em imutável eternidade, sem qualquer interferência ou assistência externa” “Do ponto de vista da contemplação, não importa o que perturba a necessária quietude, mas que ela seja perturbada. § Tradicionalmente, portanto, a expressão vita activa recebe seu significado da vita contemplativa

der Bedürftigkeit eins lebendigen Köpers, an den die Kontemplation gebunden bleibt – à necessidade de um corpo vivo, ao qual a contemplação permanece vinculada”

Agostinho fala do dever da caridade, que seria insuportável sem a <doçura> (suavitas) e o <deleite da verdade> obtido na contemplação (A cidade de Deus, xix. 19).”

títulos de livro: O ÔNUS DO ÓCIO

MÁSCARA DO MASCARADO

O consagrado ressentimento do filósofo contra a condição humana de possuir um corpo não é a mesma coisa que o antigo desprezo pelas necessidades da vida; a sujeição à necessidade era apenas um dos aspectos da existência corpórea, e uma vez libertado dessa necessidade o corpo era capaz daquela aparência pura que os gregos chamavam de beleza.”

se o uso da expressão vita activa, como aqui o proponho, está em manifesta contradição com a tradição, é que duvido não da validade da experiência subjacente à distinção, mas antes da ordem hierárquica inerente a ela desde o início.” “o enorme valor da contemplação na hierarquia tradicional embaçou as diferenças e articulações no âmbito da própria vita activa (…) a despeito das aparências, essa condição não foi essencialmente alterada pelo moderno rompimento com a tradição nem pela inversão final da sua ordem hierárquica, em Marx e Nietzsche. A estrutura conceitual permaneceu mais ou menos intacta, e isso se deve à própria natureza do ato de <virar de cabeça para baixo> os sistemas filosóficos ou os valores atualmente aceitos, isto é, à natureza da própria operação.” Agora, dá a mão a Heidegger.

o sábio estóico deixou de ser um cidadão do seu país e passou a ser um cidadão do universo.”

Ao discutir formas asiáticas de adoração e as crenças em um Deus invisível, Heródoto menciona explicitamente que, em comparação com esse Deus transcendente (como diríamos hoje), situado além do tempo, da vida e do universo, os deuses gregos eram antropophyeis, i.e., tinham a mesma natureza e não apenas a mesma forma do homem.” “Os homens são <os mortais>, as únicas coisas mortais que existem, porque, ao contrário dos animais, não existem apenas como membros de uma espécie cuja vida imortal é garantida pela procriação.” “Essa vida individual difere de todas as outras coisas pelo curso retilíneo do seu movimento, que, por assim dizer, trespassa o movimento circular da vida biológica.”

Homero ainda não conhece a palavra pragmata, que em Platão (ta ton anthropon pragmata) é mais bem traduzida como <negócios humanos> e tem a conotação de inquietação e futilidade.”

só os melhores (os aristoi), que constantemente provam serem os melhores (aristeuein, verbo que não tem equivalente em nenhuma outra língua) e que <preferem a fama imortal às coisas mortais>, são realmente humanos” “Essa era ainda a opinião de Heráclito, opinião da qual dificilmente se encontra equivalente em qualquer filósofo depois de Sócrates.” “é somente em Platão que a preocupação com o eterno e a vida do filósofo são vistas como inerentemente contraditórias e em conflito com a luta pela imortalidade, que é o modo de vida do cidadão, o bios politikos.”

nunc stans (<aquilo que é agora>)”

Politicamente falando, se morrer é o mesmo que <deixar de estar entre os homens>, a experiência do eterno é uma espécie de morte, e a única coisa que a separa da morte real é que ela não é definitiva, porque nenhuma criatura viva pode suportá-la durante muito tempo.”

A queda do Império Romano demonstrou claramente que nenhuma obra de mãos mortais pode ser imortal”

nem mesmo a ascendência do secular na era moderna e a concomitante inversão da hierarquia tradicional entre ação e contemplação foram suficientes para resgatar do oblívio a procura da imortalidade”

nem um animal nem um deus é capaz de ação: o bardo canta feitos de deuses e homens, não histórias de deuses e histórias de homens. De modo análogo, a Teogonia de Hesíodo trata não dos feitos dos deuses, mas da gênese do mundo (116)”

Essa reação especial entre e ação e estar junto parece justificar plenamente a antiga tradução zoon politikon de Aristóteles como animal socialis, que já encontramos em Sêneca e depois, com Tomás de Aquino, tornou-se a tradução consagrada: homo est naturaliter politicus, id est, socialis. Melhor que qualquer teoria elaborada, essa substituição inconsciente do político pelo social revela até que ponto havia sido perdida a original compreensão grega da política. É significativo, mas não decisivo, que a palavra <social> seja de origem romana e não tenha equivalente na língua ou no pensamento gregos.” “somente com o ulterior conceito de uma societas generis humani, uma <sociedade da espécie humana>, é que o termo <social> começa adquirir o sentido geral de condição humana fundamental.”

Ou a cidade desagregava a família, com o tempo, ou não poderia perdurar” Fustel de Coulanges “Não só o abismo entre o lar e a cidade era muito mais profundo na Grécia do que em Roma, mas somente na Grécia a religião olímpica, que era a religião de Homero e da cidade-Estado, era separada da religião mais antiga da família e do lar, e superior a esta. Enquanto Vesta, a deusa da lareira, passou a ser a protetora de uma <lareira da cidade> e tornou-se parte do culto político oficial após a unificação e segunda fundação de Roma, sua equivalente grega”

A tradução literal das últimas linhas de Antígona (1350-54) é a seguinte: <Mas as grandes palavras, neutralizando (ou revidando) os grandes golpes dos soberbos, ensinam a compreensão na velhice.> O conteúdo dessas linhas é tão enigmático para a compreensão moderna que raramente se encontra um tradutor que ouse dar a elas seu sentido estrito. Uma exceção é a tradução de Hölderlin: <Grosse Blicke aber, / Grosse Streiche der hohen Schultern / Vergeltend, / Sie haben im Alter gelehrt, zu denken.> Uma anedota contada por Plutarco ilustra, em nível muito menos elevado, a ligação entre agir e falar. Certa vez, um homem aproximou-se de Demóstenes e disse o quanto foi violentamente espancado. <Mas>, disse Demóstenes, <não sofreste nada do que estás me dizendo>. O outro levantou a voz em seguida e exclamou: <Eu não sofri nada?><Agora>, disse Demóstenes, <escuto a voz de quem foi ofendido e sofreu> (Vidas, <Demóstenes>). Um último vestígio dessa antiga conexão entre o discurso e o pensamento, ausente em nossa noção de exprimir o pensamento por meio de palavras, pode ser encontrado na popular frase de Cícero: ratio et oratio.”

a maioria das ações políticas, na medida em que permanecem fora da esfera da violência, são realmente realizadas por meio de palavras; mais fundamentalmente, o ato de encontrar as palavras certas no momento certo, independentemente da informação ou comunicação que transmitem, constitui uma ação.” “Na pólis, a ação e o discurso separaram-se e tornaram-se atividades cada vez mais independentes. (…) Característico desse desdobramento é o fato de que todo político era chamado de <rétor> e que a retórica, a arte de falar em público, em oposição à dialética, que era a arte do discurso filosófico, era definida por Aristóteles como a arte da persuasão (cf. Retórica, 1354a12ss., 1355b26ss.). (A distinção, aliás, vem de Platão, Górgias, 448.) É nesse sentido que devemos compreender a opinião grega acerca do declínio de Tebas, atribuído ao fato de terem os tebanos abandonado a retórica em favor do exercício militar (veja-se Jacob Burckhardt, Griechische Kulturgeschichte, ed. Kroener, III, 190).”

Ser político, viver em uma pólis, significava que tudo era decidido mediante palavras e persuasão, e não força e violência. Para os gregos, forçar pessoas mediante violência, ordenar ao invés de persuadir, eram modos pré-políticos de lidar com as pessoas típicos da vida fora da pólis, característicos do lar e da vida em família, em que o chefe da casa imperava com poderes incontestes e despóticos, ou da vida nos impérios bárbaros da Ásia, cujo despotismo era freqüentemente comparado à organização doméstica.” rePOLInização familiar

A antiga liberdade do cidadão romano desapareceu quando os imperadores romanos adotaram o título de dominus, <ce nom qu’Auguste et que Tibère encore repoussaient comme une malédiction et une injure> (H. Wallon, Histoire de l’esclavage dans l’antiquité (1847), III, 21).”

O pensamento político que corresponde a esse desdobramento já não é a ciência política, e sim a <economia nacional> ou a <economia social>” “Assim, é-nos difícil compreender que, segundo o pensamento dos antigos sobre esses assuntos, o próprio termo <economia política> teria sido contraditório: pois o que fosse <econômico>, relacionado com a vida do indivíduo e a sobrevivência da espécie, não era assunto político, mas doméstico por definição.”

Não pretendemos negar com isso que o Estado-nação e sua sociedade surgiram do reino feudal e do feudalismo, em cuja estrutura a família e a casa têm importância jamais igualada na Antiguidade Clássica. A <nação> medieval era um conglomerado de famílias”

Coulanges vê na lei ateniense que tornou dever filial sustentar os pais a prova da perda do poder paterno. Contudo, o poder paterno só era limitado quando entrava em conflito com os interesses da cidade, e nunca em benefício do membro da família como indivíduo. Assim, a prática de vender crianças e enjeitar [deserdar] filhos pequenos foi exercida durante toda a Antiguidade (cf. R. H. Barrow, Slavery in the Roman Empire (1928))”

O que impediu a pólis de violar as vidas privadas dos seus cidadãos, e a fez ver como sagrados os limites que cercavam cada propriedade, não foi o respeito pela propriedade privada como a conhecemos, mas o fato de que, sem possuir uma casa, um homem não podia participar dos assuntos do mundo porque não tinha nele lugar algum que fosse propriamente seu. Até Platão, cujos planos políticos previam a abolição da propriedade privada e a expansão da esfera pública ao ponto de aniquilar completamente a vida privada, ainda falava com grande reverência de Zeus Herkeios, o protetor das fronteiras, e chamava de divinos os horoi, os limites entre os Estados, sem nisso ver qualquer contradição. É interessante notar que havia cidades gregas onde os cidadãos eram obrigados por lei a dividir entre si suas colheitas e consumi-las em comum, embora cada um deles tivesse propriedade absoluta e inconteste do seu pedaço de terra.”

a violência é o ato pré-político de liberar-se da necessidade da vida para conquistar a liberdade no mundo.” “ser um escravo significava estar sujeito, também, à violência praticada pelo homem. Essa <infelicidade> dupla e redobrada da escravidão é inteiramente independente do efetivo bem-estar subjetivo do escravo. Assim, um homem livre e pobre preferia a insegurança de um mercado de trabalho que mudasse diariamente a uma ocupação regular e garantida; esta última, por lhe restringir a liberdade de fazer o que desejasse a cada dia, já era considerada servidão (douleia), e até o trabalho árduo e penoso era preferível à vida tranqüila de muitos escravos domésticos. (…) vd. Xenofonte – Memorabilia (ii.8)

Ser livre significava nem governar nem ser governado. Segundo Coulanges, todas as palavras gregas e latinas que exprimem algum tipo de governo de um homem sobre os outros, como rex, pater, anax, basileus, referiam-se originariamente a relações domésticas e eram nomes que os escravos davam a seus senhores.”

A igualdade, portanto, longe de estar ligada à justiça, como nos tempos modernos, era a própria essência da liberdade” Finalmente um lugar para aplicar o lema francês.

Em alemão, a palavra Volkswirtschaftslehre sugere que existe um sujeito coletivo da atividade econômica”

O que continua a ser surpreendente é que tenha sido Maquiavel o único teórico político pós-clássico que, em um extraordinário esforço para restaurar a antiga dignidade da política, percebeu o abismo e compreendeu até certo ponto a coragem necessária para transpô-lo, que o descreveu na elevação <do Condottiere de uma baixa posição para um alto posto> vd. Discursos, Livro II, Cap. 13.”

<Já no tempo de Sólon, a escravidão era considerada pior que a morte> (Robert Schlafer, <Greek theories of slavery from Homer to Aristotle>, Harvard studies in classical philology (1936), 47.)” “convém lembrar que a maioria dos escravos era de inimigos derrotados. E os escravos gregos eram geralmente da mesma nacionalidade que os seus senhores; haviam demonstrado sua natureza escrava por não terem cometido suicídio e, como a coragem era a virtude política par excellence, haviam demonstrado com isso sua indignidade <natural>. A atitude em relação aos escravos mudou no Império Romano, não só devido à influência do estoicismo, mas porque uma proporção muito maior da população escrava era escrava de nascimento.”

Era <[vida] boa> exatamente porque, tendo dominado as necessidades do mero viver, tendo se libertado do trabalho e da obra e superado o anseio inato de sobrevivência comum a todas as criaturas vivas, deixava de ser limitada ao processo biológico da vida.” !!!

O primeiro eloqüente explorador da intimidade e, até certo ponto, o seu teórico foi Jean-Jacques Rousseau, que, de modo bastante característico, é o único grande autor ainda citado freqüentemente pelo primeiro nome.” “A intimidade do coração, ao contrário do lar privado, não tem lugar objetivo e tangível no mundo, e a sociedade contra a qual ela protesta e se afirma não pode ser localizada com a mesma certeza que o espaço público.”

A observação de Sêneca, que, ao discutir a utilidade de ter escravos altamente instruídos (que sabem de cor todos os clássicos) para um senhor supostamente um tanto ignorante, comenta: <O que a casa sabe, o senhor sabe> (Ep. 27:6, citado por Barrow).”

o domínio público era reservado à individualidade; era o único lugar em que os homens podiam mostrar quem realmente eram e o quanto eram insubstituíveis.”

É o mesmo conformismo, a suposição de que os homens se comportam ao invés de agir em relação aos demais, que está na base da moderna ciência da economia, cujo nascimento coincidiu com surgimento da sociedade e que, juntamente com seu principal instrumento técnico, a estatística, se tornou a ciência social por excelência.” “A economia clássica pressupunha que o homem, na medida em que é um ser ativo, age exclusivamente por interesse próprio e é movido por um único desejo, o desejo de aquisição. A introdução, por Adam Smith, de uma <mão invisível para promover um fim que não fazia parte da intenção (de ninguém)> demonstra que mesmo esse mínimo de ação, com a sua motivação uniforme, contém ainda demasiada iniciativa imprevisível para o estabelecimento de uma ciência. Marx desenvolveu a economia clássica mais ainda ao substituir os interesses individuais e pessoais por interesses de grupo ou de classe, e ao reduzir esses interesses de classe a duas classes principais, de capitalistas e operários, de sorte que só lhe restou um conflito em que a economia clássica enxergava uma multidão de conflitos contraditórios. O motivo pelo qual o sistema econômico de Marx é mais consistente e coerente, e, portanto, aparentemente muito mais <científico> que os de seus predecessores, reside primordialmente na construção do <homem socializado>, que é um ser ainda menos ativo que o <homem econômico> da economia liberal.”

Aplicar à política ou à história a lei dos grandes números e dos longos períodos equivale a obliterar voluntariamente o próprio objeto dessas duas” “Politicamente, isso significa que, quanto maior é a população de qualquer corpo político, maior é a probabilidade de que o social, e não o político, constitua o domínio público. Os gregos, cuja cidade-Estado foi o corpo político mais individualista e menos conformista que conhecemos, tinham plena consciência do fato de que a pólis, com a sua ênfase na ação e no discurso, só poderia sobreviver se o número de cidadãos permanecesse restrito. Grandes números de pessoas amontoadas desenvolvem uma inclinação quase irresistível na direção do despotismo, seja o despotismo de uma pessoa ou o do governo da maioria” Imagine só 9 bilhões de Aloísios…

Estatisticamente, isso resulta em um declínio da flutuação. (…) A uniformidade estatística não é de modo algum um ideal científico inócuo; é sim o ideal político, não mais secreto, de uma sociedade que, inteiramente submersa na rotina da vida cotidiana, aceita pacificamente a concepção científica inerente à sua própria existência.”

Não Karl Marx, mas os próprios economistas liberais tiveram de introduzir a <ficção comunista>, i.e., supor a existência de um único interesse da sociedade como um todo, que com <uma mão invisível> guia o comportamento dos homens e produz a harmonia de seus interesses conflitantes.”

Myrdal – The political element in the development of economic theory

O que Marx não compreendeu – e em seu tempo seria impossível compreender – é que os germes da sociedade comunista estavam presentes na realidade de um lar nacional, e o que atravancava o completo desenvolvimento dela não era qualquer interesse de classe como tal, mas somente a já obsoleta estrutura monárquica do Estado-nação.”

O que tradicionalmente chamamos de Estado e de governo cede lugar aqui à mera administração – um estado de coisas que Marx previu corretamente como o <definhamento do Estado>, embora estivesse errado ao presumir que somente uma revolução pudesse provocá-lo, e mais errado ainda quando acreditou que essa completa vitória da sociedade significaria o eventual surgimento do <reino da liberdade>.”

a economia, que altera padrões de comportamento somente nesse campo bastante limitado da atividade humana, foi finalmente sucedida pela pretensão oniabrangente das ciências sociais, que, como <ciências do comportamento>, visam a reduzir o homem como um todo, em todas as suas atividades, ao nível de um animal comportado e condicionado. Se a economia é a ciência da sociedade em suas primeiras fases, quando suas regras de comportamento podiam ser impostas somente a determinados setores da população e a uma parcela de suas atividades, o surgimento das <ciências do comportamento> indica claramente o estágio final desse desdobramento, quando a sociedade de massas já devorou todas as camadas da nação e o <comportamento social> converteu-se em modelo de todas as áreas da vida.”

Todas as palavras européias para <trabalho> – o latim e o inglês labor, o grego ponos, o francês travail, o alemão Arbeit – significam dor e esforço e são usadas também para as dores do parto. Labor tem a mesma raiz etimológica que labare (<cambalear sob uma carga>); ponos e Arbeit têm as mesmas raízes etimológicas que <pobreza> (penia em grego e Armut em alemão). Mesmo Hesíodo, tido como um dos poucos defensores do trabalho na Antiguidade, via ponon alginoenta (<o trabalho penoso>) como o primeiro dos males que atormentavam os homens (Teogonia, 226). Quanto ao uso grego, conferir G. Herzog-Hauser, Ponos, em Pauly-Wissowa. As palavras alemãs Arbeit e arm derivam ambas do germânico arbma-, que significava solitário e desprezado, abandonado. Veja-se Kluge & Götze, Etymologisches Wörterbuch (1951). No alemão medieval, usam-se essas palavras para traduzir labor, tribulatio, persecutio, adversitas, malum (cf. Klara Vontobel, Das Arbeitsethos des deutschen Protestantismus (Dissertation, Berna, 1946)).”

A tão citada observação de Homero – de que Zeus retira metade da excelência (areté) de um homem no dia em que ele sucumbe à escravidão (Odisséia, 17:320ss.) – é colocada na boca de Eumeu, ele mesmo um escravo, significando uma mera afirmação objetiva, e não uma crítica ou um julgamento moral. O escravo perde a excelência porque perde a admissão ao domínio público, onde a excelência pode se revelar.”

Embora nos tenhamos tornado excelentes na atividade do trabalho que realizamos em público, a nossa capacidade de ação e de discurso perdeu muito de seu antigo caráter desde que a ascendência do domínio social baniu estes últimos para a esfera do íntimo e do privado. Essa curiosa discrepância não passou despercebida do público, que geralmente a atribui a uma suposta defasagem entre nossas capacidades técnicas e nosso desenvolvimento humanístico em geral, ou entre as ciências físicas, que alteram e controlam a natureza, e as ciências sociais, que ainda não sabem como alterar e controlar a sociedade.”

Para nós, a aparência – aquilo que é visto e ouvido pelos outros e por nós mesmos – constitui a realidade. Em comparação com a realidade que decorre do ser visto e ouvido, mesmo as maiores forças da vida íntima – as paixões do coração, os pensamentos do espírito, os deleites dos sentidos – levam uma espécie de existência incerta e obscura, a não ser que, e até que, sejam transformadas, desprivatizadas e desindividualizadas, por assim dizer, de modo que assumam um aspecto adequado à aparição pública. Esse é também o motivo pelo qual é impossível <traçar o perfil de qualquer escravo que viveu […]. Até alcançarem a liberdade e a notoriedade, todos os escravos são tipos obscuros, mais que pessoas> (Barrow, Slavery in the Roman Empire, p. 156).”

Goethe observou certa vez que envelhecer é <retirar-se gradualmente da aparência> (stufenweises Zurücktretenaus der Erscheinung); a verdade dessa observação, bem como o aspecto real desse processo de desaparecimento, tornam-se bastante tangíveis nos autorretratos dos grandes mestres quando velhos – Rembrandt, Leonardo, etc. –, nos quais a intensidade dos olhos parece iluminar e presidir uma carne que fenece.”

Dada a sua inerente não-mundanidade (worldlessness), o amor só pode ser falsificado e pervertido quando utilizado para fins políticos, como a transformação ou a salvação do mundo.”

O moderno encantamento com <pequenas coisas>, embora pregado pela poesia do início do século XX em quase todas as línguas européias, encontrou sua apresentação clássica no petit bonheur do povo francês. Desde o declínio de seu outrora vasto e glorioso domínio público, os franceses tornaram-se mestres na arte de serem felizes entre <pequenas coisas>, no espaço de suas quatro paredes, entre a cômoda e a cama, a mesa e a cadeira, entre o cachorro, o gato e o vaso de flores, estendendo a essas coisas um cuidado e uma ternura que, em um mundo onde a industrialização rápida extermina constantemente as coisas de ontem para produzir os objetos de hoje, podem até parecer o último recanto puramente humano do mundo.”

Encontrar um vínculo entre as pessoas suficientemente forte para substituir o mundo foi a principal tarefa política da primeira filosofia cristã; e foi Agostinho quem propôs edificar sobre a caridade não apenas a <fraternidade> cristã, mas todas as relações humanas. Essa caridade, porém, muito embora a sua desmundanidade (worldlessness) corresponda claramente à experiência humana geral do amor, é ao mesmo tempo nitidamente diferente dele por ser algo que, como o mundo, está entre os homens”

A não mundanidade como um fenômeno político só é possível com a premissa de que o mundo não durará; mas, com tal premissa, é quase inevitável que a não mundanidade venha, de uma forma ou de outra, a dominar a cena política. Foi o que sucedeu após a queda do Império Romano e parece estar ocorrendo novamente em nosso tempo – embora por motivos diferentes e de forma muito diversa, e talvez bem mais desalentadora.”

Se o mundo deve conter um espaço público, não pode ser construído apenas para uma geração e planejado somente para os que estão vivos, mas tem de transcender a duração da vida de homens mortais.”

nas condições modernas, é tão improvável que alguém aspire sinceramente à imortalidade terrena que possivelmente temos razão de ver nela apenas a vaidade.”

o que importa não é que haja falta de admiração pública pela poesia e pela filosofia no mundo moderno, mas sim que essa admiração não constitui um espaço no qual as coisas são salvas da destruição pelo tempo.”

Verlassenheit

embora a condição dos escravos fosse provavelmente um pouco melhor em Roma que em Atenas, é bastante característico que um escritor romano, Plínio, o Moço, tenha acreditado que, para os escravos, a casa do senhor era o mesmo que a res publica para os cidadãos.” “Essa atitude <liberal>, que podia, em certas circunstâncias, originar escravos muito prósperos e altamente educados, significou apenas que o fato de ser próspero não tinha qualquer realidade na pólis grega, e que ser filósofo não tinha muita importância na república romana.” “Os escravos romanos desempenharam um papel muito maior na cultura romana que o dos escravos gregos na Grécia, onde, por outro lado, o papel destes últimos na vida econômica foi muito mais importante (cf. Westermann, em Pauly-Wissova, p. 984).”

Coulanges (A cidade antiga, Anchor, 1956) afirma: <O verdadeiro significado de familia é propriedade: designa o campo, a casa, dinheiro e escravos> (p. 107). Mas essa <propriedade> não é vista como vinculada à família; pelo contrário, <a família é vinculada ao lar, o lar é ligado ao solo> (p. 62). O importante é que <a fortuna é imóvel como o lar e o túmulo aos quais está vinculada. O homem é que se vai> (p. 74).”

O peculium (as <posses privadas de um escravo>) podia representar somas consideráveis e mesmo incluir escravos próprios (vicarii). Barrow fala da <propriedade que mesmo o mais humilde de sua classe possuía> (Slavery in the Roman Empire, p. 122. Esta obra constitui a melhor descrição do papel do peculium).”

Coulanges menciona uma observação de Aristóteles de que, nos tempos antigos, o filho não podia ser cidadão enquanto o pai estivesse vivo; quando este morria, somente o filho mais velho gozava de direitos políticos.”

todos podiam participar dos mistérios, mas a ninguém era lícito falar deles.” Karl Kerenyi, Die Geburt der Helena (1943-45)

a idéia de que a atividade política é fundamentalmente o ato de legislar, embora de origem romana, é essencialmente moderna e encontrou sua mais alta expressão na filosofia política de Kant”

A palavra pólis tinha originariamente a conotação de algo como <muro-circundante> (ring-wall) e, ao que parece, o latim urbs exprimia também a noção de um <círculo> e derivava da mesma raiz de orbis. Encontramos a mesma relação na palavra inglesa <town>, que, originariamente, como o alemão Zaun, significava cerca (cf. R. B. Onians, The origins of European thought (1954), p. 444, n. 1).”

Os <Livros dos Costumes> ingleses ainda traziam uma <nítida distinção entre o artífice e o cidadão livre, o franke homme da cidade. (…) Se um artífice se tornasse tão rico que desejasse vir a ser um homem livre, devia renegar a sua arte e desfazer-se de todos os seus instrumentos> (W. J. Ashley)”

Caso o dono de uma propriedade preferisse ampliá-la ao invés de utilizá-la para viver uma vida política, era como se ele sacrificasse prontamente a sua liberdade e voluntariamente se tornasse aquilo que o escravo era contra sua vontade, ou seja, um servo da necessidade. Essa me parece ser a solução do <conhecido enigma com que se depara no estudo da história econômica do mundo antigo, o fato de ter a indústria se desenvolvido até certo ponto, mas tenha estancado inesperadamente de realizar o progresso que se podia esperar […], (considerando-se o fato de que) os romanos demonstravam eficiência e capacidade de organização em larga escala em outros setores, nos serviços públicos e no exército> (Barrow, op. cit., p. 109-110). Esperar a mesma capacidade de organização em questões privadas como em <serviços públicos> parece ser um preconceito devido às condições modernas. Max Weber, em seu notável ensaio (<Agrarverhältnisse im Altertum>, Gesammelte Aufsätze zur Sozial und Wirtschaftsgeschichte (1924)), já havia insistido sobre o fato de que as cidades antigas eram mais <centros de consumo que de produção>, e que o antigo proprietário de escravos era um <rentier e não um capitalista (Unternehmer)> (p. 13, 22 ss. e 144). A indiferença dos autores antigos no tocante a questões econômicas, aliada à falta de documentos a esse respeito, aumenta o peso do argumento de Weber.”

Todas as histórias da classe operária, isto é, uma classe de pessoas completamente destituídas de propriedade e que vivem somente da obra de suas mãos, comportam o mesmo ingênuo pressuposto de que sempre existiu tal classe. Contudo, como vimos, nem mesmo os escravos eram destituídos de propriedade na Antiguidade, e geralmente se verifica que os chamados trabalhadores livres da Antiguidade não passavam de <vendeiros, negociantes e artífices livres> (Barrow, p. 126). M. E. Park (The plebs urbana in Cicero’s day (1921)) conclui, portanto, que não existiam trabalhadores livres, visto que o homem livre parecia ser sempre algum tipo de proprietário. W. J. Ashley resume a situação na Idade Média até o século XV: <Não existia ainda uma grande classe de assalariados, uma ‘classe operária’ no sentido moderno da expressão. Chamamos hoje de ‘operários’ a um grupo de homens entre os quais alguns indivíduos podem, realmente, ser promovidos a mestres, mas cuja maioria jamais pode esperar galgar uma posição mais alta. No século XIV, porém, trabalhar alguns anos como diarista era apenas um estágio pelo qual os homens mais pobres tinham que passar, enquanto a maioria provavelmente se estabelecia como mestre-artífice assim que terminava o aprendizado> (An introduction to English economic history and theory, p. 93-94).”

Conferir o engenhoso comentário sobre a frase <a propriedade é um roubo> que ocorre na Théorie de la proprieté, p. 209-210, de Proudhon, publicada postumamente, na qual ele apresenta a propriedade em sua <natureza egoísta e satânica> como o <meio mais eficaz de resistir ao despotismo sem derrubar o Estado>.”

Logo que ingressou no domínio público, a sociedade assumiu o disfarce de uma organização de proprietários (property-owners), que, ao invés de requererem o acesso ao domínio público em virtude de sua riqueza, exigiram dele proteção para o acúmulo de mais riqueza.”

Devo confessar que não vejo em que se baseiam os economistas liberais da sociedade atual (que hoje se chamam de conservadores) para justificar seu otimismo, quando afirmam que a apropriação privada de riqueza será bastante para proteger as liberdades individuais – ou seja, que desempenhará o mesmo papel da propriedade privada. Em uma sociedade de detentores de empregos, essas liberdades só estão seguras na medida em que são garantidas pelo Estado, e ainda hoje são constantemente ameaçadas, não pelo Estado, mas pela sociedade, que distribui os empregos e determina a parcela de apropriação individual.”

É verdade que a riqueza pode ser acumulada a tal ponto que nenhuma vida individual será capaz de consumi-la, de sorte que a família, mais que o indivíduo, vem a ser sua proprietária. No entanto, a riqueza não deixa de ser algo destinado ao uso e ao consumo, não importa quantas vidas individuais ela possa sustentar. Somente quando a riqueza se transformou em capital, cuja função principal era gerar mais capital, é que a propriedade privada igualou ou avizinhou a permanência inerente ao mundo partilhado em comum.”

CABEÇALISMO: “Quando à história da palavra <capital> como derivada do latim caput, que, na legislação romana, era empregada para designar o principal de uma dívida, veja-se W. J. Ashley, An introduction to English economic history and theory, p. 429 e 433, n. 183. Somente no século XVIII os autores passaram a empregar essa palavra no sentido moderno de <riqueza investida de forma a trazer proveito>.”

A contradição óbvia desse moderno conceito de governo, em que a única coisa que as pessoas têm em comum são os seus interesses privados, já não deve nos incomodar como ainda incomodava Marx, pois sabemos que a contradição entre o privado e o público, típica dos estágios iniciais da era moderna, foi um fenômeno temporário que trouxe a completa extinção da diferença entre os domínios privado e público, a submersão de ambos na esfera do social.”

A teoria econômica medieval ainda não concebia o dinheiro como denominador comum e como padrão, mas considerava-o como um dos consumptibiles.”

a propriedade moderna perdeu seu caráter mundano e passou a situar-se na própria pessoa, isto é, naquilo que o indivíduo somente podia perder juntamente com a vida. Historicamente, a premissa de Locke, de que o trabalho do corpo de uma pessoa é a origem da propriedade, é mais que duvidosa: no entanto, dado o fato de que já vivemos em condições nas quais a única propriedade em que podemos confiar é o nosso talento e a nossa força de trabalho, é mais do que provável que ela venha a se tornar verdadeira.”

A necessidade e a vida são tão intimamente aparentadas e conectadas que a própria vida é ameaçada quando se elimina totalmente a necessidade. (…) (As modernas discussões sobre a liberdade, nas quais esta última nunca é vista como um estado objetivo da existência humana, mas constitui um insolúvel problema de subjetividade, de uma vontade inteiramente indeterminada ou determinada, ou resulta da necessidade, evidenciam o fato de que já não se percebe uma diferença objetiva e tangível entre ser livre e ser forçado pela necessidade.) [Sartre]”

a <socialização do homem> (Marx) é mais eficazmente realizada por meio da expropriação, mas esta não é a única maneira. Nesse, como em outros aspectos, as medidas revolucionárias do socialismo ou do comunismo podem muito bem ser substituídas por uma <decadência>, mais lenta, porém não menos certa, do domínio privado em geral e da propriedade privada em particular.” [!]

Pierre Brizon, Histoire du travail et des travailleurs (4. ed., 1926), p. 184, quanto às condições de trabalho em uma fábrica do século XVII.”

nec ulla magis res aliena quam publica”

no instante em que uma boa obra se torna pública e conhecida, perde o seu caráter específico de bondade” “<Não dês tuas esmolas perante os homens, para seres visto por eles.> A bondade só pode existir quando não é percebida, nem mesmo por aquele que a faz; quem quer que se veja a si mesmo no ato de fazer uma boa obra deixa de ser bom (…) <Que a tua mão esquerda não saiba o que faz a tua mão direita.>

Talvez seja essa curiosa qualidade negativa da bondade, a ausência de manifestação fenomênica exterior, o que torna o aparecimento de Jesus de Nazaré na história um evento tão profundamente paradoxal; certamente parece ser por isso que ele pensava e ensinava que nenhum homem pode ser bom: <Por que me chamais de bom? Ninguém é bom a não ser um, isto é, Deus.> A mesma convicção se expressa no relato talmúdico dos 36 homens justos, em atenção aos quais Deus salva o mundo (…) Isso nos lembra a grande percepção de Sócrates de que nenhum homem pode ser sábio, da qual nasceu o amor à sabedoria, ou filo-sofia”

Sempre houve tentativas de dar vida ao que jamais pode sobreviver ao momento fugaz do ato, e todas elas sempre levaram ao absurdo. Os filósofos da Antiguidade tardia, que exigiam de si mesmo serem sábios, eram absurdos ao afirmar serem felizes quando queimados vivos dentro do famoso Touro de Falera. E não menos absurda é a exigência cristã de ser bom e oferecer a outra face, quando não é tomada como metáfora, mas tentada como um autêntico modo de vida.” Abraão e o milagre inaudito

Mesmo quando o filósofo decide, com Platão, deixar a <caverna> dos assuntos humanos, não precisa esconder-se de si mesmo” “O filósofo sempre pode contar com a companhia dos pensamentos, ao passo que as boas ações não podem ser companhia para ninguém” “Além disso, os pensamentos podem ser transformados em objetos tangíveis que, como a página escrita ou o livro impresso, se tornam parte do artifício humano.”

a bondade e o desamparo têm muito mais relevância para a política que a sabedoria e a solitude; mas somente a solitude pode constituir um autêntico modo de vida, na figura do filósofo, ao passo que a experiência muito mais geral do desamparo está em tal contradição com a condição humana da pluralidade que simplesmente não pode ser suportada durante muito tempo: requer a companhia de Deus, a única testemunha imaginável das boas obras, para que não venha a aniquilar inteiramente a existência humana.”

as <novas ordens> que, por <salvar a religião de sua destruição por conta da licenciosidade dos prelados e dos chefes da Igreja>, ensinam as pessoas a serem boas e a não <resistir ao mal> -, em decorrência do que <os governantes perversos podem fazer todo o mal que quiserem>.” Maquiavel – Discursos, Livro III, Capítulo I.

No capítulo seguinte, Karl Marx será criticado. Isso é lamentável em uma época em que tantos escritores que outrora ganharam a vida pela apropriação, tácita ou explícita, da grande riqueza de idéias e intuições marxianas, decidiram tornar-se antimarxistas profissionais; no decurso de tal processo, um deles até descobriu que o próprio Karl Marx era incapaz de se sustentar [to make a living], esquecendo-se por um instante das gerações de autores que ele <sustentou> [supported].”

a declaração feita por Benjamin Constant, quando se sentiu compelido a atacar Rousseau: <J’éviterai certes de me joindre aux détracteurs d’un grand homme. Quand le hasard fait qu’en apparence je me rencontre avec eux sur un seul point, je suis en défiance de moi-même; et pour me consoler de paraître un instant de leur avis […] j’ai besoin de désavouer [repudiar] et de flétrir [conservar distantes de mim], autant qu’il est en moi, ces prétendus auxiliaires.>[Cours de politique constitutionelle]

Mais uma vez, encontramos aqui completa unanimidade: a palavra <trabalho> [labor], compreendida como um substantivo, jamais designa o produto final, o resultado da ação de trabalhar, mas permanece como um substantivo verbal classificado com o gerúndio, enquanto o nome do próprio produto é invariavelmente derivado da palavra para obra (…) a forma verbal da palavra <obra> se tornou um tanto antiquada. Em ambas as línguas, alemão e francês, diferentemente do uso corrente do inglês labor, as palavras travailler e arbeiten quase perderam seu significado original de dor e atribulação (…) Grimm (Wörterbuch): <Währendin älterer Sprache die Bedeutung von molestia und schwerer Arbeit vorherrschte, die von opus, opera, zurücktrat, tritt umgekehrt in der heutigen diese vor und jene erscheint seltener.> É interessante também o fato de que os substantivos work, oeuvre, Werk apresentam uma tendência crescente de serem usados em relação a obras de arte nas três línguas.”

J-P. Vernant: <Le terme (dêmiourgoi), chez Homère et Hésiode, ne qualifie pas à l’origine l’artisan en tant que tel, comme ‘ouvrier’: il définit toutes les activités qui s’exercent en dehors du cadre de l’oikos, en faveur d’un public, dêmos: les artisans – charpentiers et forgerons – mais non moins qu’eux les devins, les héraults, les aèdes.>

Burckhardt menciona que não se conhece nenhum tratado sobre escultura. Em vista dos muitos ensaios sobre música e poesia, é provável que não se trate de acidente da tradição, como não é acidental o fato de conhecermos tantos relatos acerca do grande sentimento de superioridade e até da arrogância de famosos pintores, dos quais não existem correspondentes quando se trata de escultores. Essa valoração dos pintores e dos escultores sobreviveu muitos séculos. Encontramo-la ainda na Renascença, quando a escultura era classificada entre as artes servis, enquanto a pintura tinha uma posição intermediária entre as artes liberais e as servis (veja-se Otto Neurath…)”

Aristóteles, Política 1256a30ss.: <Há grandes diferenças nos modos de vida humanos. Os mais preguiçosos são os pastores, pois conseguem alimento sem trabalho (ponos) a partir de animais domésticos, e gozam de tempo livre (skholazousin)>” “O leitor moderno em geral tem de estar ciente de que aergia (preguiça) e skholê não são a mesma coisa. A preguiça tinha as mesmas conotações que tem para nós, e uma vida de skholê não era considerada uma vida indolente. Não obstante, o equacionamento de skholê com a inatividade é característico de uma evolução ocorrida dentro da pólis. Assim, Xenofonte nos conta que Sócrates fôra acusado de haver citado um verso de Hesíodo: <A obra não é uma desgraça, mas sim a preguiça.> A acusação era que Sócrates havia instilado em seus discípulos um espírito escravo (Memorabilia 1:2:56). Historicamente, é importante ter em mente a diferença entre o desprezo com que, nas cidades-Estados gregas, eram vistas todas as ocupações não políticas, resultante da enorme demanda de tempo e de energia dos cidadãos, e o desprezo anterior, mais original e mais geral, pelas atividades que serviam apenas para sustentar a vida – ad vitae sustentatione, como são definidas as opera servilia ainda no século XVIII. No mundo de Homero, Páris e Odisseu ajudam na construção de suas casas e a própria Nausicaa lava as roupas dos irmãos etc. Tudo isso faz parte da autossuficiência do herói homérico, de sua independência e da supremacia autônoma de sua pessoa. Nenhuma obra é sórdida quando significa maior independência; a mesma atividade pode ser sinal de servilismo se o que estiver em jogo não for a independência pessoal, e sim a mera sobrevivência, se não for uma expressão de soberania, mas de sujeição à necessidade.”

A opinião de que o trabalho e a obra eram desdenhados na Antiguidade pelo fato de que somente escravos os exerciam é um preconceito dos historiadores modernos.”

Não é surpreendente que a distinção entre trabalho e obra tenha sido ignorada na Antiguidade Clássica.”

O motivo da promoção do trabalho na era moderna foi a sua <produtividade>; e a noção aparentemente blasfema de Marx de que o trabalho (e não Deus) criou o homem, ou de que o trabalho (e não a razão) distingue o homem dos outros animais, era apenas a formulação mais radical e consistente de algo com que toda a era moderna concordava.” “Parece que foi Hume, e não Marx, o primeiro a insistir em que o trabalho distingue o homem do animal (Adriano Tilgher, Homo Faber (1929); ed. inglesa: Work: what it has meant to men through the ages (1930)); Como o trabalho não desempenha qualquer papel importante na filosofia de Hume, esse fato tem interesse apenas histórico; para ele, essa característica não tornava a vida humana mais produtiva, mas somente mais árdua e mais dolorosa que a vida animal.” “Eine unmittelbare [imediata] Konsequenz davon, dass der Mensch dem Produkt seiner Arbeit, seiner Lebenstätigkeit [condição vital], seinem Gattungswesen [condição natural, neologismo especificamente marxiano] entfremdet [alienada] ist, ist die Entfremdung des Menschen vom dem Menschen” Jugendschriften, p. 89 “dass der Arbeiter zum Produkt seiner Arbeit als einem fremden Gegenstand sich verhält [se comporta como]” Jugends., p. 83

Se o trabalho não deixa atrás de si vestígio permanente, o pensamento não deixa absolutamente coisa alguma de tangível. Por si mesmo, o pensamento jamais se materializa em objetos. Sempre que o operário [worker] intelectual deseja manifestar seus pensamentos, tem de usar as mãos e adquirir qualificação manual como qualquer outro que realiza uma obra.” Eis o nosso botar a mão na massa!

a lembrança prepara o intangível e o fútil para sua materialização final”

Cícero – De officiis

A classificação da agricultura entre as artes liberais é, naturalmente, especificamente romana. Não se deve a alguma <utilidade> especial da lavoura, como suporíamos, mas antes tem a ver com a idéia romana de patria, segundo a qual o ager Romanus, e não só a cidade de Roma, é o lugar ocupado pelo domínio público.”

em toda a história antiga, os serviços <intelectuais> dos escribas, quer atendessem a necessidades do domínio público quer a do domínio privado, eram realizadas por escravos e classificados consoante a condição deles. Somente a burocratização do Império Romano e a concomitante ascensão política e social dos imperadores levaram a uma reavaliação dos serviços <intelectuais>. Antes desse enaltecimento dos serviços públicos, os escribas eram classificados na mesma categoria dos vigias de edifícios públicos ou mesmo daqueles que conduziam os gladiadores à arena” “ele se assemelha mais ao <criado doméstico> de Adam Smith que a qualquer outro, ainda que a sua função seja menos manter intacto o processo da vida e proporcionar sua regeneração que cuidar da manutenção das várias máquinas burocráticas gigantescas, cujos processos consomem os seus serviços e devoram os seus produtos tão rápida e impiedosamente quanto o processo biológico da vida. <O trabalho de algumas das mais respeitáveis categorias da sociedade não produz, como no caso dos criados domésticos, valor algum>, diz Adam Smith, incluindo entre elas <todo o exército e a marinha>, <os funcionários públicos> e as profissões liberais, tais como as dos <clérigos, advogados, médicos, homens de letras de toda espécie>. A obra dessas pessoas, <como a declamação dos atores, a arenga do orador ou a canção do músico […] perece no próprio instante de sua produção> (A riqueza das nações, Livro I, p. 295-296, Ed. Everyman). É óbvio que Smith não encontraria dificuldade alguma para classificar o nossos <funcionários de escritório>.

É duvidoso que qualquer pintura fosse jamais tão admirada quanto a estátua do Zeus de Fídias em Olímpia, cujo poder mágico, segundo se dizia, fazia qualquer um esquecer suas aflições e penas; quem não a tinha visto vivera em vão etc.”

zeus.png

O que os bens de consumo são para a vida humana, os objetos de uso são para o mundo humano.”

Sem a lembrança e sem a reificação de que a lembrança necessita para sua realização – e que realmente a tornam, como afirmavam os gregos, a mãe de todas as artes –, as atividades vivas da ação, do discurso e do pensamento perderiam sua realidade ao fim de cada processo e desapareceriam como se nunca houvessem existido.”

Sem um mundo no qual os homens nascem e do qual se vão com a morte, haveria apenas um imutável eterno retorno, a perenidade imortal da espécie humana como a de todas as outras espécies animais. Uma filosofia da vida que não chegue, como Nietzsche, à afirmação do <eterno retorno> (eiwige Wiederkehr) como o princípio supremo de todo ente simplesmente não sabe do que está falando.” “Somente quando ingressam no mundo feito pelo homem os processos da natureza podem ser descritos como crescimento e declínio”

Trabalho é a eterna necessidade natural de efetuar o metabolismo entre o homem e a natureza.” Das Kapital, v. I, Parte 1, Cap. 1, Seção 2 / Parte 3, Cap. 5.

A despeito de hesitações ocasionais, Marx permaneceu convencido de que <Milton produziu o Paraíso Perdido pela mesma razão pela qual o bicho-da-seda produz seda> (Theories of surplus value, Londres, 1951, p. 186).”

Do ponto de vista da natureza, é a obra que é destrutiva, mais que o trabalho, uma vez que o processo da obra subtrai a matéria das mãos da natureza sem a devolver a esta no curso rápido do metabolismo natural do corpo vivo.”

Hércules, entre cujos 12 <trabalhos> heróicos constava o de limpar os estábulos de Augias. (…) Mas a luta que o corpo humano trava diariamente para manter limpo o mundo e evitar-lhe o declínio tem pouca semelhança com feitos heróicos; a persistência que ela requer, para que se repare novamente a cada dia o esgotamento de ontem, não é coragem, e o que torna o esforço tão doloroso não é o perigo, mas a implacável repetição.”

O indício duradouro do trabalho produtivo é o seu produto material – geralmente um artigo de consumo. Essa curiosa formulação ocorre em Thorstein Veblen, The Theory of the leisure class [em breve no Seclusão], 1917, p. 44.”

reificação (Vergegenständlichung)” “mundo objetivo de coisas (gegenständlichen Welt)” “O termo vergegenständlichen não ocorre muito freqüentemente em Marx, mas, quando ocorre, é sempre em um contexto crucial. Cf. Jugends., p. 88: <Das praktische Erzeugen einer gegenständlichen Welt, die Bearbeitung der unorganischen Natur ist die Bewährung [prova] des Menschen als eines bewussten Gattungswesens (…) (Das Tier [máquina]) produziert unter der Herrschaft [linha de produção, cadeia de comando] des unmittelbaren Bedürfnisses [necessidades imediatas], während der Mensch selbst frei vom physischen Bedürfnis produziert und erst wahrhaft produziert in der Freiheit von demselben.>” (…) Das Kapital (v. I, Parte 3, Cap. 5): <(Die Arbeit) ist vergegenständlicht und der Gegenstand ist verarbeiter [processado, digerido]>. O jogo de palavras em torno de Gegenstand torna obscuro o que de fato sucede no processo: por meio da reificação, uma coisa nova é produzida, mas o <objeto> que esse processo transformou em coisa é, do ponto de vista do processo, apenas matéria-prima, e não uma coisa. (A tradução inglesa editada pela Modern Library, p. 201, deixa escapar o significado do texto alemão e, assim, esquiva-se do equívoco.)” “<Des Prozess erlischt [se extingue, termina, subsume] im Produkt> op. cit. Quando Marx insiste que <o processo de trabalho termina no produto>, esquece sua própria definição desse processoo como o <metabolismo entre o homem e a natureza>, no qual o produto é imediatamente <incorporado>, consumido e destruído pelo processo vital do corpo.” “As <boas coisas> destinadas ao consumo jamais perdem completamente seu caráter natural, e o grão de trigo jamais desaparece totalmente no pão como a árvore desapareceu na mesa.”

L’être et le travail (1949), de Jules Vuillemin, é um bom exemplo do que acontece quando se tenta resolver as contradições e equívocos do pensamento de Marx. Isso só é possível se se abandona inteiramente a evidência fenomênica e se começa a tratar os conceitos de Marx como se constituíssem, por si mesmos, um complicado quebra-cabeça de abstrações.” “Kautsky perguntou a Marx em 1881 se ele não pretendia editar suas obras completas, ao que Marx respondeu: <Primeiro, é preciso escrever essas obras> (Kautsky, Aus der Frühzeit des Marxismus, 1935, p. 53).”

Contradições fundamentais e flagrantes como essas raramente ocorrem em escritores de segunda categoria; no caso dos grandes autores, conduzem ao cerne de sua obra. No caso de Marx, cuja lealdade e integridade na descrição dos fenômenos, tal como estes se apresentavam aos seus olhos, são indubitáveis, as discrepâncias importantes, observadas por todos os estudiosos de sua obra, não podem ser atribuídas à diferença <entre o ponto de vista científico do historiador e o ponto de vista moral do profeta> (Edmund Wilson), nem a um movimento dialético que exigisse o negativo, ou o mal, para produzir o positivo, ou o bem. O fato é que, em todos os estágios de sua obra, ele define o homem como um animal laborans, e então o conduz para uma sociedade na qual essa força, a maior e mais humana de todas, já não é necessária. Ficamos com a alternativa muito angustiante entre a escravidão produtiva e a liberdade improdutiva.

A mais grosseira superstição da era moderna – de que <dinheiro produz dinheiro> – e sua mais aguda intuição política – de que poder gera poder – devem sua plausibilidade à metáfora subjacente da fertilidade natural da vida. De todas as atividades humanas somente o trabalho, e não a ação nem a obra, é interminável, prosseguindo automaticamente em consonância com a vida, fora do escopo das decisões voluntárias ou dos propósitos humanamente significativos.”

<A bênção ou a alegria> do trabalho é o modo humano de experimentar a pura satisfação de estar vivo que temos em comum com todas as criaturas vivas; e é ainda o único modo de os homens também poderem permanecer e voltear com contento no círculo prescrito pela natureza, labutando e descansando, trabalhando e consumindo, com a mesma regularidade feliz e sem propósito com a qual o dia e a noite, a vida e a morte sucedem um ao outro. A recompensa das fadigas e penas repousa na fertilidade da natureza, na confiança serena de que aquele que, nas fadigas e penas, fez sua parte, permanece uma parte da natureza, no futuro de seus filhos e nos filhos de seus filhos. (…) Segundo Gêneses, o homem (adam) fôra criado para cuidar e zelar pelo solo (adamah), como o seu próprio nome, que é a forma masculina de <solo>, indica (Gn 2:5, 2:7, 2:15). <Nem havia ainda Adam para cultivar adamah (…) Formou, pois, o Senhor Deus a Adam do pó de adamah (…). E Ele, Deus, tomou a Adam e pô-lo no jardim do Éden, para ele o cultivar e guardar> (utilizo aqui a tradução de Martin Buber e Franz Rosenzweig, Die Schrift (Berlim, n.d.)). A palavra <cultivar>, leawod, que mais tarde se tornou a palavra para trabalhar em hebraico, tem a conotação de <servir>. A maldição (3:17-19) [maldita é a terra; devorarás a ti mesmo sem cessar] não menciona essa palavra, mas o significado é claro: o serviço para o qual o homem havia sido criado tornava-se agora servidão. O corrente mal-entendido popular da maldição se deve a uma interpretação inconsciente do Antigo Testamento à luz do pensamento grego. Esse mal-entendido é geralmente evitado pelos autores católicos. Conferir, por exemplo, Jacques Leclerc, Leçons de droit naturel, v. IV, Parte 2, <Travail, proprieté>, 1946, p. 31: <La peine du travail est le résultat du péché original […] L’homme non déchu eût travaillé dans la joie, mais il eût travaillé>; ou J. Chr. Nattermann, Die moderne Arbeit, soziologisch und theologisch betrachtet [O trabalho moderno, analisado sociológica e teologicamente], 1953, p. 9. É interessante, nesse contexto, comparar a maldição do Ant. Test. com a explicação aparentemente semelhante da aspereza do trabalho em Hesíodo. Diz o poeta que os deuses, para punir o homem, esconderam dele a vida, de sorte que ele tinha de procurá-la, ao passo que aparentemente tudo o que precisava fazer antes era colher os frutos da terra nos campos e nas árvores. Aqui, a maldição consiste não apenas na aspereza do trabalho, mas no próprio trabalho.”

Não existe felicidade duradoura fora do ciclo prescrito de exaustão dolorosa e regeneração prazerosa; e tudo o que desequilibra esse ciclo – a pobreza e a miséria nos quais a exaustão é seguida pela penúria ao invés da regeneração, ou grande riqueza e uma vida inteiramente isenta de esforço na qual o tédio toma o lugar da exaustão e os moinhos da necessidade, do consumo e da digestão trituram até a morte, impiedosa e esterilmente, um corpo humano impotente – arruína a felicidade elementar que advém de se estar vivo.”

Como nenhuma teoria política anterior ao socialismo e ao comunismo propusera estabelecer uma sociedade inteiramente destituída de propriedade, e como nenhum governo, antes do século XX, demonstrara séria inclinação para expropriar seus cidadãos, o conteúdo da nova teoria não podia ser inspirado pela necessidade de proteger os direitos de propriedade contra uma possível intrusão da administração governamental. O fato é que, naquela época, ao contrário de agora, quando todas as teorias da propriedade encontram-se obviamente na defensiva, os economistas não estavam absolutamente na defensiva; ao contrário, eram abertamente hostis a toda a esfera do governo que, na melhor das hipóteses, era tido como um <mal necessário>, um <reflexo da natureza humana>, e, na pior, como parasita da vida da sociedade que sem ele seria sadia.”

O homem pobre não é senhor de si mesmo (pênes ôn kai heautou mê kratôn) (Sétima Carta, 351A). Nenhum dos autores clássicos jamais pensou no trabalho como uma possível fonte de riqueza. Segundo Cícero, a propriedade é adquirida por antiga conquista, vitória ou divisão legal (aut vetere occupatione aut victoria aut lege) (De officiis, 1:21).”

O que Marx tinha ainda em comum com Locke era a pretensão de ver o processo de crescimento da riqueza como um processo natural, seguindo automaticamente suas leis, fora dos intuitos e decisões voluntárias. Se alguma atividade humana haveria de estar, de alguma forma, envolvida em tal processo, só podia ser uma <atividade> corporal cujo funcionamento natural não pudesse ser interrompido, mesmo se se desejasse.” Curiosa coincidência entre “liberais”.

LOCKE O MORIBUNDO: “o corpo realmente passa a ser a quintessência de toda propriedade, uma vez que é a única coisa que não se pode compartilhar, ainda que se desejasse. Nada, de fato, é menos comum e menos comunicável – e, portanto, mais seguramente protegido contra a visibilidade e a audibilidade do domínio público – que o que se passa dentro do nosso corpo, seus prazeres e suas dores, seu trabalho e seu consumo. (…) nada expele o indivíduo mais radicalmente do mundo que a concentração exclusiva na vida corporal, concentração à qual o homem é compelido pela escravidão ou pelo extremo da dor insuportável. Quem, por algum motivo, desejar tornar inteiramente <privada> a existência humana, independente do mundo e consciente apenas de seu próprio estar vivo, deve basear seus argumentos nessas experiências (…) a experiência <natural> subjacente à independência estóica e epicurista em relação ao mundo não é o trabalho nem a escravidão, mas a dor. A felicidade alcançada no isolamento do mundo e desfrutada dentro das fronteiras da existência privada do indivíduo jamais pode ser outra coisa senão a famosa <ausência de dor>, uma definição com a qual qualquer variante consistente do sensualismo tem de concordar. O hedonismo, a doutrina que afirma que somente as sensações corporais são reais, é apenas a forma mais radical de um modo de vida não-político, totalmente privado, a verdadeira realização do lathe biôsas kai mê politeuesthai de Epicuro (<viver oculto e não se importar com o mundo>).

Normalmente, a ausência de dor é a condição corporal suficiente para a experiência do mundo; somente se o corpo não está irritado, e, por meio da irritação, lançado para dentro de si mesmo, nossos sentidos corporais podem funcionar normalmente e receber o que lhes é oferecido.”

Parece-me que certos tipos de vícios em drogas, moderados e um tanto freqüentes, geralmente atribuídos a propriedades formadoras de hábito dessas drogas, talvez se devam ao desejo de repetir o prazer alguma vez experimentado com o alívio da dor, acompanhado por sua intensa sensação de euforia. O próprio fenômeno era bem conhecido na Antiguidade, ao passo que na literatura moderna encontro o único apoio para minha suposição em Isak Dinesen [pseudônimo de Karen Blixen], <Converse at night in Copenhagen> (Last tales, 1957, p. 388ss.), em que ela considera <a cessação da dor> um dos <três tipos de felicidade perfeita>. Platão já se opunha àqueles que, <ao deixarem de sentir dor, acreditam firmemente ter atingido a meta do […] prazer> (Rep., 585A), mas admite que esses <prazeres misturados> que se seguem à dor ou à privação são mais intensos que os prazeres puros, como o de cheirar um aroma agradável ou o de contemplar figuras geométricas. Curiosamente, foram os hedonistas que tornaram o assunto confuso e não quiseram admitir que o prazer da cessação da dor fosse mais intenso que o <prazer puro>, para não falar da mera ausência da dor. Assim é que Cícero acusava Epicuro de ter confundido a mera ausência de dor com o prazer do alijamento da dor (cf. V. Brochard, Études de philosophie ancienne et de philosophie moderne, 1912, p. 252ss.).”

Realmente, a dor causada por uma espada ou a cócega provocada por uma pluma nada me diz da qualidade ou sequer da existência mundana da espada ou da pluma. É característico de todas as teorias que argumentam contra a capacidade dos sentidos de nos fornecer o mundo que retirem a visão de sua posição como o mais alto e mais nobre dos sentidos, e substituam-na pelo tato ou o gosto que, na verdade, são os sentidos mais privados, ou seja, aqueles nos quais o corpo, ao perceber um objeto, sente primeiramente a si mesmo. Todos os pensadores que negam a realidade do mundo exterior teriam concordado com Lucrécio, que disse: <Pois o tato e nada mais que o tato (por tudo o que homens chamam sagrado) é a essência de todas as nossas sensações corporais> (The nature of the universe, p. 72). Isso, porém, não é suficiente: o tato ou o gosto em um corpo não-irritado ainda transmite demais a realidade do mundo: quando como um prato de morangos, sinto o gosto dos morangos e não o próprio gosto; ou, para usar um exemplo de Galileu, quando <passo a mão, primeiro sobre uma estátua de mármore, depois sobre um homem vivo>, percebo o mármore e o corpo vivo, e não primeiramente a minha mão a tocá-los. Assim, ao tentar demonstrar que as qualidades secundárias, como cores, gostos, cheiros, <não passam de meros nomes (que) residem unicamente no corpo sensível>, Galileu é forçado a desistir do seu próprio exemplo e a introduzir a sensação de ser titilado por uma pluma, com o que conclui: <Acredito que as várias qualidades atribuídas aos corpos naturais, tais como gostos, cheiros, cores e outras, possuem precisamente existência semelhante e não maior (Il Saggiatore, em Opere, IV, p. 333ss.; tradução citada por E. A. Burtt, Metaphysical foundations of modern science, 1932).” “Seguindo linha semelhante de raciocínio, Descartes diz: <O mero movimento de uma espada que corta parte de nossa pele causa-nos dor, mas nem por isso nos faz perceber o movimento ou a forma da espada. E é certo que essa sensação de dor não é menos diferente do movimento que a provoca […] do que são as sensações que temos de cores, sons, cheiros ou sabores (Principles, Parte 4; trad. por Haldane e Ross, Philosophical works, 1911).”

dupla dor: o doloroso esforço envolvido na reprodução da própria vida e na vida da espécie.”

Em uma sociedade de proprietários, em contraposição a uma sociedade de trabalhadores ou de assalariados, é ainda o mundo, e não a abundância natural nem a mera necessidade da vida, que está no centro do cuidado e da preocupação humanos.”

Somente se a vida da sociedade como um todo, ao invés da vida limitada dos indivíduos, é considerada como sujeito gigantesco do processo de acumulação, pode esse processo seguir totalmente livre e em plena velocidade, isento dos limites impostos pela duração da vida individual e pela propriedade possuída individualmente.”

O que todas essas teorias [filosofia do trabalho, evolução natural, desenvolvimento histórico] têm em comum, nas várias ciências – economia, história, biologia, geologia –, é o conceito de processo, virtualmente desconhecido antes da era moderna.”

Se, na virada do século (com Nie. e Bergson), a vida, e não o trabalho, foi proclamada <criadora de todos os valores>, essa glorificação do mero dinamismo do processo vital aboliu aquele mínimo de iniciativa presente até mesmo em atividades que, como o trabalho e a procriação, são impostas ao homem pela necessidade.”

Marx predisse corretamente, embora com injustificado júbilo, o <definhamento> do domínio público nas condições de um desenvolvimento desenfreado das <forças produtivas da sociedade>; e estava igualmente certo, isto é, consistente com a sua concepção do homem como um animal laborans, quando previu que os <homens socializados> gozariam sua liberação do trabalho naquelas atividades estritamente privadas e essencialmente sem-mundo que hoje chamamos de <passatempos> (hobbies). Na sociedade comunista ou socialista, todas as profissões se tornariam, por assim dizer, passatempos (hobbies): não haveria pintores, mas apenas pessoas que, entre outras coisas, gastariam seu tempo também com a pintura; ou seja, pessoas que <hoje fazem uma coisa, amanhã fazem outra, que caçam pela manhã, pescam à tarde, criam gado ao anoitecer, são críticos após o jantar, conforme julgarem conveniente, sem por isso jamais chegarem a ser caçadores, pescadores, pastores ou críticos> (Deutsche Ideologie, p. 22 e 373).”

Os produtos do trabalho, produtos do metabolismo do homem com a natureza, não permanecem no mundo tempo suficiente para se tornarem parte dele, e a própria atividade do trabalho, concentrada exclusivamente na vida e em sua manutenção, esquece-se do mundo até o extremo da não-mundanidade.” Majin Boo e a eterna “coisidade”

O fato de que a escravidão e o banimento no lar constituíam, de modo geral, a condição social de todos os trabalhadores antes da era moderna deve-se basicamente à própria condição humana; a vida, que para todas as outras espécies animais é a própria essência do seu ser, torna-se um ônus para o homem em virtude de sua inata <repugnância à futilidade>.”

Omnis vita servitium est.” Sêneca, Da tranqüilidade da alma

A condição humana é tal que a dor e o esforço não são meros sintomas que podem ser eliminados sem que se transforme a própria vida”

Se alguém soubesse que o mundo acabaria quando ele morresse, ou logo depois, esse mundo perderia toda a sua realidade, como perdeu entre os primeiros cristãos, na medida em que estavam convencidos de que as suas expectativas escatológicas seriam imediatamente realizadas. A confiança na realidade da vida, ao contrário, depende quase exclusivamente da intensidade com que a vida é experimentada, do impacto com que ele se faz sentir.”

Já se observou muitas vezes que aquilo que a vida dos ricos perde em vitalidade, em proximidade com as <boas coisas> da natureza, ganha em refinamento, em sensibilidade às coisas belas do mundo. O fato é que a capacidade humana de vida no mundo implica sempre uma capacidade de transcender e alienar-se dos processos da vida, enquanto a vitalidade e a vivacidade só podem ser conservadas na medida em que os homens se disponham a arcar com o ônus, as fadigas e as penas da vida.”

instrumentos humanos dotados de fala (o instrumentum vocale, como eram chamados os escravos no lar, entre os antigos)”

o duplo trabalho da vida: manutenção e geração

a vida de um escravo testemunhava diariamente o fato de que a <vida é escravidão> (…) O perigo aqui é óbvio. (…) sua liberdade é sempre conquistada mediante tentativas, nunca inteiramente bem-sucedidas, de libertar-se da necessidade. (…) é ainda provável que as enormes mudanças da revolução industrial, no passado, e as mudanças ainda maiores da revolução atômica, no futuro, permaneçam como mudanças do mundo, e não mudanças da condição básica da vida humana na Terra.

As ferramentas e instrumentos, que podem suavizar consideravelmente o esforço do trabalho, não são produtos do trabalho, mas da obra; não pertencem ao processo do consumo, mas são parte integrante do mundo de objetos de uso. (…) Nenhuma obra pode ser reproduzida sem ferramentas, e o nascimento do homo faber e o surgimento de um mundo de coisas feito pelo homem são, na verdade, contemporâneos da descoberta de ferramentas e de instrumentos.”

os serviços de um único criado jamais podem ser inteiramente substituídos por uma centena de aparelhos na cozinha ou por meia dúzia de robôs no subsolo (…) Um testemunho curioso e inesperado desse fato é que ele pôde ser previsto milhares de anos antes de se dar o fabuloso desenvolvimento moderno de instrumentos e de máquinas. Em tom meio fantasioso e meio irônico, Aristóteles imaginou, certa vez, aquilo que se tornou realidade tempos depois, ou seja, que <cada ferramenta fosse capaz de executar sua própria obra quando se lha ordenasse […] como as estátuas de Dédalo ou as trípodes de Hefesto que, segundo diz o poeta, ‘ingressaram por conta própria na assembléia dos deuses’>. Assim, a <lançadeira teceria e o plectro tocaria a lira sem que uma mão os guiasse>. E prossegue afirmando que isso significaria realmente que o artífice já não necessitaria de assistentes humanos, mas não que os escravos domésticos pudessem ser dispensados.”

o processo vital que exige o trabalho é uma atividade interminável, e o único <instrumento> à sua altura teria de ser um perpetuum mobile, isto é, o instrumentum vocale, tão vivo e ativo quanto o organismo a que serve.” Arednt não conheceu a “mulher do Google” ou “do Avast”

enquanto a especialização da obra é essencialmente guiada pelo próprio produto acabado, cuja natureza é exigir diferentes habilidades que são então reunidas e organizadas em um conjunto, a divisão do trabalho, pelo contrário, pressupõe a equivalência qualitativa de todas as atividades singulares para as quais nenhuma habilidade especial é necessária.” “como se fosse um só (…) o oposto da cooperação”

Não importa o que façamos, supostamente o faremos com vistas a <prover nosso próprio sustento>; é esse o veredicto da sociedade, e vem diminuindo rapidamente o número de pessoas capazes de desafiá-lo, especialmente nas profissões que poderiam fazê-lo. A única exceção que a sociedade está disposta a admitir é o artista, que, propriamente falando, é o único <operário> (worker) que restou em uma sociedade de trabalhadores (laboring society).”

não resta nem mesmo a <obra> do artista: ela foi dissolvida no divertir-se (…) Compreende-se que o divertimento do artista desempenha a mesma função que o jogo de tênis no processo vital do trabalho da sociedade ou a que a manutenção de um passatempo desempenha na vida de um indivíduo.”

em toda a Antiguidade Ocidental, a tortura, <a necessidade que nenhum homem pode suportar>, só podia ser aplicada a escravos, que, de qualquer forma, já estavam sujeitos à necessidade. <On croyait recueillir la voix même de la nature dans le cris de la douleur. Plus la douleur pénétrait avant, plus intime et plus vrai sembla être ce témoignage de la chair et du sang> Wallon. A psicologia dos antigos era muito mais cônscia do que nós do elemento de liberdade, de invenção livre, que existe na mentira. Foram as artes da violência, da guerra, da pirataria, e, finalmente, do governo absoluto, que colocaram os vencidos a serviço dos vencedores, e com isso mantiveram a necessidade em suspenso durante o mais longo período de que se tem registro na história”

Wallon demonstra, de modo brilhante, como a posterior generalização estóica de que todos os homens são escravos baseava-se nos desdobramentos do Império Romano, no qual a antiga liberdade foi gradualmente abolida pelo governo imperial, até que finalmente ninguém era livre e todos tinham seu senhor. O momento decisivo ocorreu quando primeiro Calígula e depois Trajano consentiram em ser chamados dominus, palavra usada antes somente para designar o chefe de uma casa. A chamada moralidade escrava da Antiguidade tardia e sua premissa de que não havia diferença real entre a vida do escravo e a vida do homem livre tinham um pano de fundo muito realista.

Talvez não seja exagero dizer que La condition ouvrière (1951), de Simone Weil, é o único livro na imensa literatura sobe a questão do trabalho que lida com o problema sem preconceitos e sem sentimentalismo.”

O perigo da futura automação não é tanto a tão deplorada mecanização e a artificialização da vida natural, quanto o fato de que, a despeito de sua artificialidade, toda a produtividade humana seria sugada por um processo vital enormemente intensificado e seguiria automaticamente, sem dor e sem esforço, o seu ciclo natural sempre-recorrente.”

Calcula-se que, durante a Idade Média, as pessoas raramente trabalhavam mais que a metade dos dias do ano. Havia 141 feriados oficiais (cf. Levasseur).” “superestima-se o progresso alcançado em nosso tempo, uma vez que este é medido em comparação com uma <era sombria>. É possível que a expectativa de vida na maioria dos países altamente civilizados hoje corresponda apenas à de certos séculos da Antiguidade. Não o sabemos, naturalmente, mas somos levados a essa suspeita quando refletimos sobre a idade em que morreram muitas pessoas famosas.”

na ilusão de uma filosofia mecanicista que supõe que a força de trabalho, como qualquer outra energia, não pode ser perdida, de modo que, se não for gasta e exaurida na labuta da vida, nutrirá automaticamente outras atividades <superiores>.” “Cem anos depois de Marx conhecemos a falácia desse raciocínio: o tempo excedente do animal laborans jamais é empregado em algo que não seja o consumo, e quanto maior é o tempo de que ele dispõe, mais ávidos e ardentes são os seus apetites.”

O resultado é aquilo que eufemisticamente é chamado de cultura de massas; e o seu arraigado problema é uma infelicidade universal” “A universal demanda de felicidade e a infelicidade extensamente disseminada em nossa sociedade são alguns dos mais persuasivos sintomas de que já começamos a viver em uma sociedade de trabalho que não tem suficiente trabalho para mantê-la contente.”

<se opor> [staind against]: Isso está implicado no verbo latino obicere, do qual nossa palavra <objeto> é uma derivação tardia, e na palavra alemã Gegenstand, objeto. <Objeto> significa literalmente <algo lançado> ou <posto contra>.”

os homens, a despeito de sua natureza sempre cambiante, podem recobrar sua mesmidade [sameness]”

Somente nós, que erigimos a objetividade de um mundo nosso a partir do que a natureza nos oferece, que o construímos dentro do ambiente natural para assim nos proteger dele, podemos observar a natureza como algo <objetivo>. Sem um mundo interposto entre os homens e a natureza, há eterno movimento, mas não objetividade.”

O uso contém, realmente, certo elemento de consumo, na medida em que o processo de desgaste [wearing-out process] ocorre por meio do contato do objeto de uso com o organismo consumidor vivo, e quanto mais estreito for o contato entre o corpo e a coisa usada, mais plausível parecerá o equacionamento dos dois.”

o homo faber, criador do artifício humano, sempre foi um destruidor da natureza. O animal laborans, que com o próprio corpo e a ajuda de animais domésticos nutre o processo da vida, pode ser o amo e o senhor de todas as criaturas vivas, mas permanece ainda o servo da natureza e da Terra; só o homo faber se porta como amo e senhor de toda a Terra.”

É interessante notar que Lutero, rejeitando conscientemente o compromisso escolástico com a Antiguidade grega e latina, procura eliminar da obra e do trabalho humanos todo e qualquer elemento de produção e fabricação. O trabalho humano, segundo ele, apenas <encontra> os tesouros que Deus colocou na Terra.” “Sage an, wer legt das Silber und Gold in die Berge, dass man es findet? Wer legt in die Äcker [campos] solch grosses Gut als heraus wächst…? Tut das Menschen Arbeit? Ja wohl, Arbeit findet es wohl; aber Gott muss es dahin legen, soll es die Arbeit finden… So finden wir denn, dass alle unsere Arbeit nichts ist denn Gottes Güter finden und aufheben, nichts aber möge machen und erhalten (Luther, Werke, Ed. Walch, V, 1873).

Le travailler travaille pour son oeuvre plutôt que pour lui-même: loi de générosité métaphysique, qui définit l’activité laborieuse” Chenu

Essa qualidade da permanência do modelo ou da imagem, o fato de existir antes que a fabricação comece e de permanecer depois que esta termina, sobrevivendo a todos os possíveis objetos de uso que continua ajudando fazer existir, exerceu uma forte influência na doutrina das idéias eternas de Platão. Na medida em que os seus ensinamentos foram inspirados pela palavra idea ou eidos (<aspecto> ou <forma>), que ele foi o primeiro a usar em um contexto filosófico, eles baseavam-se em experiências de poiêsis, de fabricação (fabrication), e embora Platão empregasse a sua teoria para exprimir experiências muito diferentes e talvez muito mais <filosóficas>, nunca deixou de buscar seus exemplos no campo da produção (making) quando desejava demonstrar a plausibilidade do que dizia. [Interpretações em Platão: o texto mais importante do “casal”] O testemunho de Aristóteles de que foi Pl. quem introduziu o termo idea na terminologia filosófica ocorre no 1º livro de sua Metafísica (987b8). Excelente relato do uso anterior da palavra e do ensinamento de Pl. encontra-se em Gerard F. Else, <The terminology of ideas>, Harvard studies in classical philology, v. XLVII (1936). (…) As palavras eidos e idea referem-se, sem dúvida, a formas e aspectos visíveis, especialmente de criaturas vivas; assim, é improvável que Platão concebesse a doutrina sob a influência de formas geométricas. A tese de Francis M. Cornford (Plato and Parmenides, Ed. Liberal Arts, p. 69-110), de que a doutrina é provavelmente de origem socrática, uma vez que Sócrates procurava definir a justiça em si ou a bondade em si, que não podem ser percebidas pelos sentidos, bem como pitagórica, uma vez que a doutrina da existência (chõrismos) das idéias eternas e separadas de todas as coisas perecíveis implica <a existência separada de uma alma consciente e conhecedora, à parte do corpo e dos sentidos>, parece-me muito convincente. Minha apresentação, porém, deixa em suspenso todos esses pressupostos. Ela se refere simplesmente ao Livro X da República, no qual o próprio Pl. explica sua doutrina tomando <o caso comum> de um artífice que faz camas e mesas <de acordo com a idéia <dessas camas e mesas> (…) Não é preciso dizer que nenhuma dessas explicações vai ao fundo da questão, que é a experiência especificamente filosófica subjacente ao conceito de idéia”

O homo faber é realmente amo e senhor, não apenas porque é o senhor ou se estabeleceu como senhor de toda a natureza, mas porque é senhor de si mesmo e de seus atos.Isso não se aplica ao animal laborans, sujeito às necessidades de sua própria vida, nem ao homem de ação, que depende de seus semelhantes.”

O trabalho, mas não a obra, requer, para obter melhores resultados, uma execução ritmicamente ordenada e, na medida em que muitos operários se aglomeram, exige uma coordenação rítmica de todos os movimentos individuais. A conhecida compilação feita por Karl Bücher, em 1897, de canções rítmicas de trabalho (Arbeit und Rhythmus (6. ed.; 1924)), foi seguida de volumosa literatura de caráter mais científico. Um dos melhores desses estudos (Joseph Schopp, Das deutsche Arbeitslied (1935)) ressalta o fato de que não existem canções da obra, mas somente canções de trabalho. As canções dos artífices são sociais e cantadas após o trabalho. O fato é, naturalmente, que não existe ritmo <natural> algum para a obra. Nota-se às vezes a surpreendente semelhança entre o ritmo <natural> inerente a toda operação de trabalho e o ritmo das máquinas, sem contar as repetidas queixas de que as máquinas impõem ao trabalhador um ritmo <artificial>. (…) Bücher, que acreditava que o <trabalho rítmico é um trabalho espiritual> (vergeistigt), já dizia: <Aufreibend werden nur solchen einförmigen Arbeiten, die sich nicht rhythmisch gestalten lassen> op. cit. p. 443. (…) Hendrik de Man: <diese von Bücher […] gepriesene Welt weniger die des […] handwerkmässig schöpferischen Gewerbes als die der einfachen schieren […] Arbeitsfron (ist)> (Der Kampf und die Arbeitsfreud, p. 244). (…) os próprios operários apresentam razão inteiramente diferente para sua preferência pelo trabalho repetitivo. Preferem-no porque é mecânico e não requer atenção, de sorte que, ao executá-lo, podem pensar em outra coisa. (Podem <geistig wegtreten>, nas palavras de operários berlinenses. Cf. der Rationalisierung (1954), p. 35ss…) Essa explicação é bastante digna de nota, uma vez que coincide com as muito antigas recomendações cristãs quanto aos méritos do trabalho manual, que, por exigir menor atenção, tende a interferir menos na contemplação que as outras ocupações e profissões (cf. Étienne Delaruelle, <Le travail dans les règles monastiques occidentales du 4e au 9e siècle>, Journal de psychologie normale et pathologique, v. XLI, n. 1 (1948)).”

o homem <ajustou-se> a um ambiente de máquinas desde o instante em que as concebeu. Sem dúvida, as máquinas tornaram-se condição tão inalienável de nossa existência como os utensílios e ferramentas o foram em todas as eras anteriores. (…) Nunca houve dúvida de que o homem se ajustava ou precisava de ajuste especial às ferramentas que utilizava, da mesma forma como uma pessoa se ajusta às próprias mãos. (…) enquanto dura a obra nas máquinas, o processo mecânico substitui o ritmo do corpo humano. Mesmo a mais sofisticada ferramenta permanece como serva, incapaz de guiar ou de substituir a mão. Mesmo a mais primitiva máquina guia o trabalho do nosso corpo até finalmente substituí-lo por completo.”

Uma das importantes condições da Rev. Industrial foi a extinção das florestas e a descoberta do carvão mineral como substituto de madeira. (…) Barrow (…) sustenta que o único fator que <impediu a aplicação das máquinas à indústria […] (foi) a inexistência de combustível bom e barato […]”

é somente ao mundo da eletricidade que as categorias do homo faber, para quem todo instrumento é um meio de atingir um fim prescrito, já não se aplicam. Pois agora já não usamos o material como a natureza nos fornece, matando processos naturais, interrompendo-os ou imitando-os. Em todos esses casos, alteramos e desnaturalizamos a natureza para nossos próprios fins mundanos, de sorte que o mundo ou o artifício humano, de um lado, e a natureza, de outro, permanecem como duas entidades nitidamente separadas.”

Diebold: a linha de montagem é o resultado <do conceito da manufatura como um processo contínuo>, e se poderia acrescentar que a automação é o resultado da maquinização (machinization) da linha de montagem.”

Günther Anders, em um interessante ensaio sobre a bomba atômica (Die Antiquiertheit des Menschen (1956)), sustenta de modo convincente, que a palavra <experimento> já não se aplica aos experimentos nucleares envolvendo explosões das novas bombas. Pois era característico dos experimentos o fato de que o espaço no qual ocorriam era estritamente limitado e isolado do meio ambiente. Os efeitos das bombas são tão gigantescos que <seu laboratório tornou-se coextensivo com o globo> (p. 260).”

nossa palavra <natureza>, quer a derivemos da raiz latina nasci, nascer, quer a remetamos à sua origem grega, physis, que vem phyein, surgir de, aparecer por si mesmo.”

Chamamos de automático todo movimento autopropulsado e, portanto, fora do alcance da interferência voluntária ou intencional. (…) As categorias do homo faber e do seu mundo não se aplicam aqui, como jamais poderiam aplicar-se à natureza e ao universo natural.”

a questão não é tanto se somos senhores ou escravos de nossas máquinas, mas se estas ainda servem ao mundo e às coisas do mundo ou se, pelo contrário, elas e o movimento automático de seus processos passaram a dominar e mesmo a destruir o mundo e as coisas.”

Em seu contínuo processo de operação, este mundo de máquinas está perdendo inclusive aquele caráter mundano independente que as ferramentas e utensílios e a primeira maquinaria da era moderna possuíam em tão alto grau. Os processos naturais de que se alimenta o relacionam cada vez mais com o próprio processo biológico, de sorte que os aparelhos, que outrora manejávamos livremente, começam a mostrar-se como se fossem <carapaças integrantes do corpo humano tanto quanto a carapaça é parte integrante do corpo da tartaruga>.”

a madeira justifica matar a árvore e a mesa justifica destruir a madeira.”

todo fim pode novamente servir como meio em algum outro contexto. Em outras palavras, em um mundo estritamente utilitário, todos os fins são constrangidos a serem de curta duração e a transformarem-se em meios para alcançar outros fins. Quanto à interminabilidade da cadeia de meios e fins (o Zweck-progressus in infinitum) e à destruição do significado que lhe é inerente, comparar com Nietzsche, Afor. 666, em Wille zur Macht.” Não entendo que edição é essa que possui mais de 583/594 aforismos! (*)

O ideal de utilidade, como os ideais de outras sociedades, já não pode ser concebido como algo necessário a fim de se obter alguma outra coisa; esse ideal simplesmente impugna o questionamento sobre seu próprio uso. É óbvio que não há resposta à pergunta que Lessing, certa vez, dirigiu aos filósofos utilitaristas do seu tempo: <E qual o uso do uso?> A perplexidade do utilitarismo é que ele é capturado pela cadeia interminável de meios e fins sem jamais chegar a algum princípio que possa justificar a categoria de meios e fim (…) O <a fim de> torna-se o conteúdo do <em razão de>; em outras palavras, a utilidade instituída como significado gera a ausência de significado.” “Só em um mundo estritamente antropocêntrico, onde o usuário, i.e., o próprio homem, torna-se o fim último que põe termo à cadeia infindável de meios e fins, pode a utilidade como tal adquirir a dignidade da significação. A tragédia, porém, é que, no instante em que o homo faber parece ter se realizado nos termos de sua própria atividade, ele passa a degradar o mundo das coisas, que é o fim e o produto final de sua mente e de suas mãos. Se o homem como usuário é o mais alto de todos os fins, <a medida de todas as coisas>, então não somente a natureza, tratada pelo homo faber como o <material quase sem valor> sobre o qual ele opera, mas as próprias coisas <valiosas> tornam-se simples meios e, com isso, perdem o seu próprio <valor> intrínseco.

O utilitarismo antropocêntrico do homo faber encontrou sua mais alta expressão na fórmula de Kant: nenhum homem pode jamais tornar-se um meio para um fim, todo ser humano é um fim em si mesmo. Embora encontremos antes de Kant uma percepção das funestas conseqüências que um desobstruído e desorientado pensamento em termos de meios e fins invariavelmente tem para o domínio político (p.ex., na insistência de Locke em que não se deve permitir que um homem seja dono do corpo de outro ou use a força do seu corpo), é somente em Kant que a filosofia das primeiras fases da era moderna liberta-se inteiramente das trivialidades do bom senso, encontradas sempre onde o homo faber dita os padrões da sociedade. Naturalmente, o motivo disso é que Kant não pretendia formular ou conceitualizar os princípios do utilitarismo do seu tempo, mas, ao contrário, desejava antes de tudo pôr em seu devido lugar a categoria de meios-e-fim e evitar que fosse empregada no campo da ação política. Não obstante, sua fórmula não pode renegar sua origem no pensamento utilitário, como é o caso de sua outra famosa e também inerentemente paradoxal interpretação da atitude do homem em relação aos únicos objetos que não são <para o uso>, a saber, as obras de arte, com as quais ele disse que experimentamos um <prazer sem qualquer interesse>. A expressão de K. é <ein Wohlgefallen ohne alles Interesse> (Kritik der Unteilskraft, ed. Casssirer, V, 272). Pois a mesma operação que faz do homem o <fim supremo> permite-lhe <sujeitar, se puder, toda a natureza a esse fim>, isto é, degradar a natureza e o mundo a simples meios, privado-os de sua dignidade independente. Nem mesmo Kant foi capaz de resolver o dilema ou iluminar a cegueira do homo faber no tocante ao problema do significado sem voltar ao paradoxal <fim em si mesmo>, e essa perplexidade reside no fato de que, embora somente a fabricação, com sua instrumentalidade, seja capaz de construir um mundo, esse mesmo mundo torna-se tão sem valor quanto o material empregado, simples meios para outros fins, quando se permite que os padrões que presidiram o seu surgimento prevaleçam depois que ele foi estabelecido.”

(*) Tudo é uma questão de edição!

I AM AN END (THE SUPREME GOOD, A PRETEXT):

666.

For ages we have always ascribed the value of an action, of a character, of an existence, to the intention, to the purpose for which it was done, acted, or lived: this primeval idiosyncrasy of taste ultimately takes a dangerous turn—provided the lack of intention and purpose in all phenomena comes ever more to the front in consciousness. With it a general depreciation of all values seems to be preparing: <All is without sense.> —This melancholy phrase means: <All sense lies in the intention, and if the intention is absolutely lacking, then sense must be lacking too.> In conformity with this valuation, people were forced to place the value of life in a <life after death,> or in the progressive development of ideas, or of mankind, or of the people, or of man to superman; but in this way the progressus in infinitum of purpose had been reached: it was ultimately necessary to find one’s self a place in the process of the world (perhaps with the disdaemonistic outlook [perspectiva irracional], it was a process which led to nonentity).

In regard to this point, <purpose> needs a somewhat more severe criticism: it ought to be recognised that an action is never caused by a purpose; that an object and the means thereto are interpretations, by means of which certain points in a phenomena are selected and accentuated, at the cost of other, more numerous, points; that every time something is done for a purpose, something fundamentally different, and yet other things

happen; that in regard to the action done with a purpose, the case is the same as with the so-called purposefulness of the heat [Moira] which is radiated from the sun: the greater part of the total sum is squandered [desperdiçada]; a portion of it, which is scarcely worth reckoning, has a <purpose,> has <sense>; that an <end> with its <means> is an absurdly indefinite description, which indeed may be able to command as a precept, as <will,> but presupposes a system of obedient and trained instruments, which, in the place of the indefinite, puts forward a host of determined entities (i.e. we imagine a system of clever but narrow intellects who postulate end and means, in order to be able to grant our only known <end,> the rôle of the <cause of an action,>—a proceeding to which we have no right: it is tantamount to solving a problem by placing its solution in an inaccessible world which we cannot observe).

Finally, why could not an <end> be merely an accompanying feature in the series of changes among the active forces which bring about the action—a pale stenographic symbol stretched in consciousness beforehand, and which serves as a guide to what happens, even as a symbol of what happens, not as its cause?—But in this way we criticise will itself: is it not an illusion to regard that which enters consciousness as will-power, as a cause? Are not all conscious phenomena only final phenomena—the lost links in a chain, but apparently conditioning one another in their sequence within the plane of consciousness? This might be an illusion.

<a Terra em geral e todas as forças da natureza> perdem seu <valor porque não apresentam a reificação resultante da obra> (<Der Wasserfall, wie die Erde überhaupt, wie alle Naturkraft hat keinen Wert, weil er keine in ihm vergegenständlichte Arbeit darstellt>) (Das Kapital, III, 698). Não foi por outro motivo senão essa atitude do homo faber em relação ao mundo que os gregos, em seu período clássico, declararam que todo o campo das artes e ofícios, no qual os homens operavam com instrumentos e faziam algo não pela satisfação de fazê-lo, mas para produzir outra coisa, era banáustico, palavra talvez mais bem-traduzida como <filisteu>, conotando a vulgaridade de pensar e agir em termos de conveniência.”

A instrumentalização de todo o mundo e de toda a Terra, essa ilimitada desvalorização de tudo o que é dado, esse processo de crescente ausência de significado no qual todo fim é transformado em um meio e que só pode ser interrompido quando se faz do próprio homem o amo e senhor de todas as coisas, não provém diretamente do processo de fabricação; pois, do ponto de vista da fabricação, o produto acabado é um fim em si mesmo, uma entidade independente e durável, dotada de existência própria, tal como o homem é um fim em si mesmo na filosofia política de Kant.” “É bastante óbvio que os gregos temiam essa desvalorização do mundo e da natureza, assim como seu inerente antropocentrismo – a opinião <absurda> de que o homem é o ente mais elevado e de que tudo o mais está sujeito às exigências da vida humana (Arist.) (…) Talvez o melhor exemplo do quanto eles estavam conscientes das conseqüências de se considerar o homo faber como a mais elevada possibilidade humana seja o famoso argumento de Platão contra Protágoras e sua declaração aparentemente auto-evidente de que <o homem é a medida de todas as coisas de uso (chrmata), da existência das que existem e da inexistência das que não existem> (Teeteto, 152 & Crátilo, 385E). (Evidentemente, Protágoras não disse que <o homem é a medida de todas as coisas>, como a tradição e as traduções consagradas o fizeram dizer. O suposto dito de Protágoras – <o homem é a medida de todas as coisas> – seria, em grego, anthrôpos metron pantôn, correspondendo, p.ex., à frase de Heráclito: polemos patêr pantón, <o conflito é o pai de todas as coisas>.) O que importa nesse assunto é que Platão percebeu imediatamente que, quando se faz do homem a medida de todas as coisas de uso, é ao homem como usuário e instrumentalizador a quem se relaciona o mundo, e não ao homem como orador, homem de ação ou pensador.” “Nessa interpretação platônica, Protágoras se afigura, realmente, como o primeiro precursor de Kant, pois se o homem é a medida de todas as coisas, então o homem é a única coisa que escapa à relação de meios-e-fim, o único fim em si mesmo, capaz de usar tudo o mais como meio.”

Se se permitir que os critérios do homo faber governem o mundo depois de construído, como devem necessariamente presidir o nascimento desse mundo, então o homo faber finalmente se servirá de tudo e considerará tudo o que existe como simples meios à sua disposição. Julgará cada coisa como se ela pertencesse à categoria de chrêmata ou de objetos de uso, de sorte que, seguindo o ex. de Platão, o vento deixará de ser concebido como força natural, existente por si mesmo, para ser considerado exclusivamente consoante as necessidades humanas de calor e refrigério – e isso, naturalmente, significaria que o vento, como algo objetivamente dado, seria eliminado da experiência humana. Por conta de tais conseqüências, Platão, que no fim da vida lembra mais uma vez n’As Leis (716D) o dito de Protágoras, responde com uma fórmula quase paradoxal: não o homem – que, em virtude de suas necessidades e talentos, quer usar tudo e, portanto, termina por privar todas as coisas de seu valor intrínseco –, mas <o deus é a medida até dos simples objetos de uso>.”

Marx – em um dos muitos apartes que testificam seu eminente senso histórico – observou certa vez que a definição do homem por Benjamin Franklin como um fazedor de instrumentos é tão típica do <ianquismo>, i.e., da era moderna, quanto a definição do homem como um animal político o era da Antiguidade. (DK, p. 358, n. 3)”

No alemão medieval, a palavra Störer [artífice] equivale exatamente à palavra grega dêmiourgos. <Der griechische dêmiourgos heisst ‘Störer’, er geht beim Volk arbeiten, er geht auf die Stör.> Stör significa dêmos (<povo>). (Cf. Jost Trier…1950).”

os tiranos nutriam a ambição, sempre frustrada, de dissuadir os cidadãos da preocupação com os assuntos políticos” Já hoje os Boechats neocons estimulam a participação desenfreada.

O domínio público do homo faber é o mercado de trocas, no qual ele pode exibir os produtos de sua mão e receber a estima que merece. Essa inclinação para a habilidade na exibição pública (showmanship) é intimamente conectada com a <propensão de barganhar, permutar e trocar uma coisa por outra>, que, segundo Adam Smith, distingue os homens dos animais, e possivelmente não menos arraigada que ela. E ele acrescenta, com ênfase: <Ninguém jamais viu um cão fazer uma troca eqüitativa e deliberada de um osso por outro com outro cão> (Wealth of nations, ed. Everyman’s, I, 12).”

A privatividade exigida nos primórdios da era moderna como direito supremo de cada membro da sociedade era efetivamente a garantia de isolamento, sem a qual nenhuma obra pode ser produzida. (…) Esse isolamento em relação aos outros é a condição de vida necessária a toda maestria, que consiste em estar a sós com a <idéia>, a imagem mental da coisa que irá existir. (…) e as palavras <operário> e <mestre> – ouvrier e maître – eram originalmente empregadas como sinônimos. (Levasseur e Pierre Brizon)” “a diferença entre a qualificação do mestre e a ajuda não-qualificada é temporária, como a diferença entre adultos e crianças.”

Sewall – The theory of value before Adam Smith (1901) in: “Publications of the American Economic Association”

O valor é aquela qualidade que nenhuma coisa pode ter na privatividade, mas que adquire automaticamente assim que aparece em público.”

a primeira coisa sobre a qual insistem os professores medievais é que o valor não é determinado pela excelência intrínseca à própria coisa, pois, se fosse assim, uma mosca seria mais valiosa que uma pérola, uma vez que é intrinsecamente mais excelente” George O’Brien – An essay on medieval economic teaching, 1920

Weisskopf – The psychology of economics (1955)

A palavra mais antiga para <valia> (worth), que ainda encontramos em Locke, foi suplantada pela expressão <valor de uso> (use value), aparentemente mais científica.” “a perda de toda valia intrínseca começa com a sua transformação em valores (values) ou mercadorias” “A relatividade universal, o fato de que uma coisa só existe em relação a outras, e a perda do valor intrínseco, o fato de que tudo deixa de possuir valor <objetivo>, independente da avaliação mutável da oferta e da procura, são inerentes ao próprio conceito de valor.” “preço justo”

Mas a resposta de Platão – de que não o homem, mas um <deus é a medida de todas as coisas> – seria um gesto moralizante vazio se realmente fosse verdadeiro que, como presumia a era moderna, a instrumentalidade, disfarçada em utilidade, governa o âmbito do mundo acabado tão exclusivamente quanto governa a atividade por meio da qual o mundo e todas as coisas nele contidas passaram a existir.”

Ainda que a origem histórica da arte tivesse caráter exclusivamente religioso ou mitológico, o fato é que a arte sobreviveu magnificamente à sua separação da religião, da magia e do mito.” Anti-Benjamin

certo pressentimento de imortalidade – não a imortalidade da alma ou da vida, mas de algo imortal alcançado por mãos mortais” Anti-Unamuno

O pensar relaciona-se com o sentimento e transforma seu desalento mudo e inarticulado, do mesmo modo como a troca transforma a ganância crua do desejo e o uso transforma o anseio desesperado das necessidades – até que todos se tornem adequados a adentrar o mundo e serem transformados em coisas, serem reificados. (…) uma capacidade comunicativa e aberta-ao-mundo (world-open) transcende e libera no mundo uma apaixonada intensidade que estava aprisionada no si-mesmo (self).”

Rilke (Aus Taschen-Büchern und Merk-Blättern, 1950):

Aus unbeschreiblicher Verwandlung stammen

solche Gebilde -: Fühl! und glaub!

Wir leidens oft: zu Asche werden Flammen,

doch, in der Kunst: zur Flamme wird der Staub.

Hier ist Magie. In das Bereich des Zaubers

scheint das gemeine Wort hinaufgestuft (…)

und ist doch wirklich wie der Ruf des Taubers,

der nach der unsichtbaren Taube ruft”

é sempre na <letra morta> que o <espírito vivo> deve sobreviver, uma morte da qual ele só pode ser resgatado quando a letra morta entra novamente em contato com uma vida disposta a ressuscitá-lo, ainda que essa ressurreição dos mortos tenha em comum com todas as coisas vivas o fato de que ela também tornará a morrer.”

Na música e na poesia, que são as menos <materialistas> das artes porque seu <material> consiste em sons e palavras, a reificação e a manufatura (workmanship) necessárias são mínimas. O jovem poeta e a criança prodígio na música podem atingir a perfeição sem muito treino e experiência, fenômeno que dificilmente ocorre na pintura, na escultura ou na arquitetura.”

É essa proximidade com a lembrança viva que permite que o poema perdure, retenha sua durabilidade fora da página escrita ou impressa; e, embora a <qualidade> de um poema possa estar submetida a vários padrões diferentes, sua <memorabilidade> inevitavelmente determinará sua durabilidade, i.e., a possibilidade de ficar permanentemente fixado na lembrança da humanidade.”

<fazer um poema> (…) O mesmo se aplica ao alemão dichten, que provavelmente deriva do latim dictare: <das ausgesonnene geistig Geschaffene niederschreiben order zum Nietderschreiben vorsagen> (Grimm, Dicionário) (…) A mesma ênfase no artesanato do poeta está presente na expressão grega para a arte da poesia: tektônes hymnôn.”

COMO ENTENDER MEU NAMORADO”

o processo cognitivo termina. O pensamento, ao contrário, não tem outro fim ou propósito além de si mesmo, e não chega sequer a produzir resultados; não só a filosofia utilitária do homo faber, mas os homens de ação e os entusiastas por resultados nas ciências jamais se cansaram de assinalar quão inteiramente <inútil> é o pensamento – realmente, tão inútil quanto as obras de arte que inspira. E nem mesmo esses produtos inúteis o pensamento pode reivindicar para si, pois estes, como os grandes sistemas filosóficos, dificilmente podem ser propriamente chamados de resultados do pensamento puro (…) é precisamente o processo do pensar que o artista ou o filósofo que escreve têm de interromper e transformar para a reificação materializante de sua obra. A atividade de pensar é tão incessante e repetitiva quanto a própria vida; perguntar se o pensamento tem algum significado configura o mesmo enigma irrespondível que a pergunta sobre o significado da vida”

Por outro lado, a cognição toma parte em todos os processos, não somente nos da obra intelectual ou artística, cuja finalidade pode ser posta à pova e, se não produzir resultados, terá fracassado, como fracassa a maestria do carpinteiro quando ele fabrica uma mesa de duas pernas.”

Os processos mentais que se alimentam da força cerebral são geralmente chamados de inteligência, e essa inteligência pode realmente ser medida em testes de inteligência, da mesma forma como a força física pode ser medida por outros meios. Suas leis, as leis da lógica, podem ser descobertas como outras leis da natureza”

Se fosse verdadeiro que o homem é um animal rationale no sentido em que a era moderna compreendeu essa expressão – ou seja, uma espécie animal que difere das outras pelo fato de ser dotada de uma força cerebral superior –, então as recém-inventadas máquinas eletrônicas, que às vezes para consternação e outras vezes para confusão dos seus inventores, são tão espetacularmente mais <inteligentes> que os seres humanos, seriam realmente homunculi. Na realidade elas são, como todas as máquinas, meras substitutas e aperfeiçoadoras artificiais da força de trabalho humana, adotando o consagrado expediente da divisão do trabalho de subdividir toda operação em seus movimentos constitutivos mais simples – substituindo, p.ex., a multiplicação pela adição iterativa. (…) graças a essa velocidade superior, a máquina pode dispensar a multiplicação, que é o expediente técnico pré-eletrônico para acelerar a adição. Tudo o que os computadores gigantes provaram é que a era moderna estava errada ao acreditar, com Hobbes, que a racionalidade, no sentido de <calcular as conseqüências>, é a mais alta e a mais humana das capacidades do homem, e que os filósofos da vida e do trabalho, Marx ou Bergson ou Nietzsche, estavam certos quando viam nesse tipo de inteligência, que confundiam com a razão, uma mera função do processo vital, ou, como dizia Hume, uma mera <escrava das paixões>.

os homens que agem e falam necessitam da ajuda do homo faber em sua capacidade suprema, i.e., da ajuda do artista, dos poetas e historiadores, dos construtores de monumentos ou escritores, porque sem eles o único produto da atividade dos homens, a estória que encenam e contam, de modo algum sobreviveria. (…) Não precisamos escolher aqui entre Platão e Protágoras, ou decidir se o homem ou um deus deve ser a medida de todas as coisas; o que é certo é que a medida não pode ser nem as necessidades coativas da vida biológica e do trabalho, nem o instrumentalismo utilitário da fabricação e do uso.

Nihil igitur agit nisi tale existens quale patiens fiere debet.”

nada age, a menos que ao agir torne patente seu si-mesmo latente.”

Dante

INCIATIVA & SEGUNDO NASCIMENTO

O Dilema Hindu de Zaratustra: “Os homens podem perfeitamente viver sem trabalhar, obrigando outros a trabalharem para eles; e podem muito bem decidir simplesmente usar e fruir do mundo de coisas sem lhe acrescentar um só objeto útil; a vida de um explorador ou senhor de escravos e a vida de um parasita podem ser injustas, mas certamente são humanas. Por outro lado, uma vida sem discurso e sem ação – e esse é o único modo de vida em que há sincera renúncia de toda aparência e de toda vaidade, na acepção bíblica da palavra – é literalmente morta para o mundo”

Arnold Gehlen – Der Mensch: Seine Natur und seine Stellung in der Welt (1955)

iniciar (como indica a palavra grega archein, <começar>, <conduzir> e, finalmente, <governar>), imprimir movimento a alguma coisa (que é o significado original do termo latino agere).”

para que houvesse um início o homem foi criado, sem que antes dele ninguém o fosse” Sto. Agostinho

Para Agostinho, havia tanta diferença entre os dois começos que ele empregava uma palavra diferente para indicar o começo que é o homem (initium), chamando de principium o início do mundo, que é a tradução consagrada do primeiro versículo da Bíblia. Como se vê em A cidade de Deus 11:32, a palavra principium portava, para Ag., um sentido muito menos radical; o início do mundo <não significa que nada houvesse sido feito antes (uma vez que os anjos o foram)>, enquanto, na frase acima citada, referente ao homem, ele acrescenta explicitamente que ninguém existia antes dele.”

Com a criação do homem, veio ao mundo o próprio princípio do começar”

SURPREENDENTE IMPRESCIÊNCIA: “a origem da vida a partir da matéria inorgânica é uma infinita improbabilidade dos processos inorgânicos, como o é o surgimento da Terra, do ponto de vista dos processos do universo, ou a evolução da vida humana a partir da vida animal. O novo sempre acontece em oposição à esmagadora possibilidade das leis estatísticas e a sua probabilidade que, para todos os fins práticos e cotidianos, equivale à certeza: assim, o novo sempre aparece na forma de um milagre.”

o ato primordial e especificamente humano deve conter, ao mesmo tempo, resposta à pergunta que se faz a todo recém-chegado: <Quem és?>” “A ação muda deixaria de ser ação, pois não haveria mais um ator”

se aqui estivesse em questão apenas o uso da ação como meio para um fim, é evidente que o mesmo fim poderia ser alcançado muito mais facilmente com a violência muda, de tal modo que a ação parece uma substituta pouco eficaz da violência, da mesma forma que o discurso, do ponto de vista da mera utilidade, parece um substituto inadequado da linguagem de signos.”

é quase certo que o <quem>, que aparece tão clara e inconfundivelmente para os outros, permanece oculto para a própria pessoa, à semelhança do daimón, na religião grega, que acompanha cada homem durante toda sua vida, sempre observando por detrás, por cima de seus ombros, de sorte que só era visível para aqueles que ele encontrava.”

deve-se estar disposto a correr o risco de se desvelar, e esse risco não pode ser assumido nem pelo realizador de boas obras, que deve ser desprovido do si-mesmo (self) e manter-se em completo anonimato, nem pelo criminoso, que precisa esconder-se dos outros. Ambos são figuras solitárias, o primeiro é <pró> e o segundo <contra> todos os homens; ficam, portanto, fora do âmbito do intercurso humano e são figuras politicamente marginais, que, em geral, surgem no cenário histórico em épocas de corrupção, desintegração e ruína política.”

soldadodesconhecido

Os monumentos ao <Soldado Desconhecido>, erigidos após a Primeira Guerra Mundial, comprovam a necessidade de glorificação, subsistente ainda na época, de encontrar um <quem>, um alguém identificável a quem quatro anos de carnificina deveriam ter revelado. A frustração desse desejo e a recusa a se resignar ao fato brutal de que o agente da guerra havia sido realmente ninguém inspiraram a construção desses monumentos ao <desconhecido>, a todos aqueles a quem a guerra fracassou em tornar conhecidos, roubando-lhes, com isso, não suas realizações, mas sua dignidade humana. O livro de William Faulkner, Uma fábula (1954), supera em discernimento e clareza quase toda a literatura sobre a I G. M. pelo fato de que o seu herói é o Soldado Desconhecido.”

a notória impossibilidade filosófica de se chegar a uma definição do homem”

A crermos em Xenofonte, Sócrates comparava seu daimonion aos oráculos, e insistia em que ambos deviam ser utilizados somente para os assuntos humanos, em que nada é certo, e não para as questões das artes e ofícios, em que tudo é previsível (ibid., 7-9).”

Na teoria política, o materialismo é pelo menos tão antigo quanto a suposição platônico-aristotélica de que as comunidades políticas (poleis) – e não apenas a vida familiar ou a coexistência de várias unidades familiares (oikiai) – devem sua existência à necessidade material. (…) ambos são precursores da teoria do interesse, já plenamente desenvolvida por Bodin – tal como os reis governam os povos, o Interesse governa os reis.”

Que toda vida individual entre o nascimento e a morte possa afinal ser narrada como uma estória com começo e fim é a condição pré-política e pré-histórica da história (history), a grande estória sem começo nem fim.”

É digno de nota o fato de que Platão, que não tinha indício algum do moderno conceito de história, tenha sido o primeiro a inventar a metáfora do ator que, nos bastidores, por trás dos homens que atuam, puxa os cordões e é responsável pela estória. O deus platônico é apenas um símbolo do fato de que as estórias reais, ao contrário das que inventamos, não têm autor; como tal, é o verdadeiro precursor da Providência, da <mão invisível>, da Natureza, do <espírito do mundo>, do interesse de classe e de outras noções semelhantes mediante as quais os filósofos da história cristãos e modernos tentaram resolver o desconcertante problema de que embora a história deva a sua existência aos homens, obviamente não é, todavia, <feita> por eles.”

o simples fato de que Adam Smith tenha precisado de uma <mão invisível> a guiar as transações econômicas no mercado de trocas mostra claramente que as relações de troca envolvem algo mais que a mera atividade econômica”

embora saibamos muito menos a respeito de Sócrates, que jamais escreveu uma linha sequer nem deixou obra alguma atrás de si, que acerca de Platão ou Aristóteles, sabemos muito melhor e mais intimamente quem foi Sócrates, por conhecermos sua estória, do que sobre quem foi Aristóteles, acerca de cujas opiniões estamos muito mais bem informados.”

Em Homero a palavra hêrôs sem dúvida tinha uma conotação de distinção, mas uma distinção de que era capaz qualquer homem livre. Em parte alguma aparece com o significado ulterior de <semideus>, resultante talvez da deificação dos antigos heróis épicos.” “A dimensão dessa coragem original, sem a qual a ação, o discurso e, portanto, segundo os gregos, a liberdade seriam impossíveis, não é menor se o <herói> for um covarde – pode ser até maior.”

o teatro é a arte política por excelência; somente no teatro a esfera política da vida humana é transposta para a arte. Pelo mesmo motivo, é a única arte cujo assunto é, exclusivamente, o homem em sua relação com os outros homens.”

A crença popular em um <homem forte>, que, isolado dos outros, deve sua força ao fato de estar só, é ou mera superstição, baseada na ilusão de que podemos <produzir> algo no domínio dos assuntos humanos – <produzir> instituições ou leis, p.ex., como fazemos mesas e cadeiras, ou produzir homens <melhores> ou <piores> (Platão já recriminava Péricles por não haver <tornado melhor o cidadão>, pois, no fim de sua carreira, os atenienses eram piores que antes – Górgias, 515) –, ou é, então, a desesperança consciente de toda ação, política e não política, aliada à esperança utópica de que seja possível tratar os homens como se tratam outros <materiais>.”

A história está repleta de exemplos de impotência do homem forte e superior que não sabe como angariar o auxílio ou o agir conjunto (co-acting) de seus semelhantes – fracasso que é freqüentemente atribuído à fatal inferioridade do grande número e ao ressentimento que as pessoas eminentes inspiram nas medíocres.”

Aos dois verbos gregos archein e prattein (<atravessar, <realizar>, <acabar>) correspondem os dois verbos latinos agere e gerere (cujo significado original é <conduzir>). (…) Em ambos os casos, a palavra que originalmente designava apenas a segunda parte da ação, ou seja, sua realização – prattein e gerere –, passou a ser o termo aceito para designar a ação em geral, enquanto a palavra que designava o começo da ação adquiriu um significado especial, pelo menos na linguagem poética. Archein passou a significar, principalmente, <governar> e <liderar>, quando empregada de maneira específica, e agere passou a significar <liderar>, mais do que <pôr em movimento>.”

a força do iniciador e líder mostra-se em sua iniciativa e nos riscos que assume, não na efetiva realização. No caso do governante bem-sucedido, ele pode reivindicar para si aquilo que, na verdade, é a realização de muitos – algo que jamais teria sido permitido a Agamêmnon, que era rei, mas não governante.”

a tentação política por excelência é realmente a hybris, e não a vontade de poder, como somos inclinados a acreditar.”

a luz que ilumina os processos da ação e, portanto, todos os processos históricos só aparece quando eles terminam – muitas vezes quando todos os participantes já estão mortos. A ação só se revela plenamente para o contador da estória (storyteller), ou seja, para o olhar retrospectivo do historiador, que realmente sempre sabe melhor o que aconteceu do que os próprios participantes. Todo relato feito pelos próprios atores, ainda que, em raros casos, constitua versão fidedigna de suas intenções, finalidades e motivos, torna-se uma mera fonte de material útil nas mãos do historiador”

O velho ditado de que ninguém pode ser considerado eudaimon antes de morrer talvez dê uma indicação do assunto em questão, se formos capazes de ouvir seu significado original após 2500 anos de trivializante repetição; nem mesmo a tradução latina, proverbial e corriqueira já em Roma – nemo ante mortem beatus esse dici potest –, transmite o significado original, embora talvez tenha inspirado a prática da Igreja Católica de só beatificar os santos depois de há um bom tempo seguramente mortos. Porque eudaimonia não significa felicidade nem beatitude; é intraduzível e talvez até inexplicável. Tem a conotação de bem-aventurança, mas sem qualquer implicação religiosa, e significa, literalmente, algo como o bem-estar do daimôn que acompanha cada homem durante a sua vida, que é a sua identidade distinta, mas só aparece e é visível para os outros. É contra essa distorção inevitável que o coro afirma seu próprio conhecimento: estes outros vêem, <têm> diante dos olhos, como um exemplo, o daimôn de Édipo; a miséria dos mortais é serem cegos para seu próprio daimôn.”

O AZAR DE LULA E DE PELÉ: “a essência humana só pode passar a existir depois que a vida se acaba, deixando atrás de si nada além de uma estória. Assim, quem pretender conscientemente ser <essencial>, deixar atrás de si uma estória e uma identidade que conquistará <fama imortal>, deve não só arriscar a vida, mas também optar expressamente, como o fez Aquiles, por uma vida curta e uma morte prematura. Só o homem que não sobrevive ao seu ato supremo permanece senhor inconteste de sua identidade e sua possível grandeza, porque se retira, na morte, das possíveis conseqüências e da continuação do que iniciou. (…) Aquiles permanece dependente do contador de estórias, do poeta ou historiador, sem os quais tudo o que ele fez teria sido em vão”

O fato de que a palavra grega equivalente à expressão <cada um> (hekastos) deriva de hekas (<distante>) parece indicar o quanto esse individualismo deve ter sido profundamento arraigado.”

[para] os gregos, o legislador era como o construtor dos muros da cidade, alguém cuja obra devia ser executada e terminada antes que a atividade política pudesse começar. Conseqüentemente, era tratado como qualquer outro artesão ou arquiteto, e podia ser trazido de fora e contratado sem que precisasse ser cidadão, ao passo que o direito de politeuesthai, de engajar-se nas muitas atividades que afinal ocorriam na pólis, era exclusivo dos cidadãos. [As Leis]” “A escola socrática voltou-se para essas atividades, que os gregos consideravam pré-políticas, por desejar combater a política e a ação.” “bastaria que os homens renunciassem a sua capacidade para a ação – que é fútil, ilimitada e incerta com relação aos resultados – para que houvesse um remédio para a fragilidade dos assuntos humanos.”

Com aquela cândida abstenção de moralização tão típica da Antiguidade grega (mas não da romana), Aristóteles começa por dizer, como algo óbvio, que o benfeitor sempre ama aqueles a quem ajuda mais do que é amado por eles. Em seguida, passa a explicar que isso é bastante natural, visto que o benfeitor executou uma obra, uma ergon, ao passo que o beneficiado apenas aceitou sua beneficência. Segundo Aristóteles, o benfeitor ama sua <obra>, a vida do beneficiário que ele <produziu>, tanto quanto o poeta ama seus poemas; e lembra ao leitor que o amor do poeta por sua obra dificilmente é menos apaixonado que o amor da mãe pelos filhos.“a obra, tal como a atividade do legislador na concepção grega, só pode tornar-se o conteúdo da ação no caso de qualquer ação subseqüente ser indesejável ou impossível”

Esperava-se que a pólis multiplicasse as oportunidades de conquistar <fama imortal>, ou seja, multiplicasse para cada homem as possibilidades de distinguir-se, de revelar em ato e palavra quem era em sua distinção única. Uma das razões, senão a principal, do incrível desenvolvimento do talento e do gênio em Atenas, bem como do rápido e não menos surpreendente declínio da cidade-Estado, foi precisamente que, do começo ao fim, o principal objetivo da pólis era fazer do extraordinário uma ocorrência ordinária da vida cotidiana.”

Onde quer que vás, serás uma pólis” lema da colonização grega

Ser privado dele [do espaço da pólis] significa ser privado da realidade que, humana e politicamente falando, é o mesmo que a aparência.” “<o que aparece a todos, a isso chamamos Ser> Heráclito diz essencialmente o mesmo que Aristóteles no trecho citado, ao declarar que o mundo é um só e é comum a todos os que estão despertos, mas que todos os que dormem voltam-se para seu próprio mundo (Diels, <